20% off on all Whistler Radio Accessories

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wizardofid

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Today is the last day to save 20% on ALL Radio Scanner Accessories
with code SCANNER20


(I wonder if this might be the final clearing at Whistler?)
 

ScanFanEd

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Today is the last day to save 20% on ALL Radio Scanner Accessories
with code SCANNER20


(I wonder if this might be the final clearing at Whistler?)

That was my thought as well when I got the notice about their sale. I sure don't see any signs that they are continuing with scanner development. If that is the case, I sure hope someone else steps into the ring (Unication?) as a bit of competition can be very healthy!
 

ten13

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I sure don't see any signs that they are continuing with scanner development
And why should they?

Think of it: in reality, what is the future of "scanner hobbyists"? Not only are the police restricting monitoring of their systems (and, rightfully so), but most other public service operations are, too. And those who are not may well be on the verge of buying into the next generation of proprietary systems developed by the "named" radio manufacturers. And we really don't know what those new proprietary systems will be. Will they be too expensive to put into a scanner, boosting up the price of the radios far beyond what a "hobbyist" wants to pay (and if the manufacturer even license access to the system) for a very limited amount of monitoring, such as school buses and store security?

As I said elsewhere, don't expect Uniden, or anyone else, to put too much future effort into their radios. I'm sure they have other products worthy of their efforts which don't have such a narrow market.

There will come a time, very shortly, that, if you want to monitor an agency, etc, you're going to have to belong to the agency (paid or volly) and hope they issue you a radio. And, even then, with limited access.

Those who are beating a drum thinking that they have a Constitutional right to monitor anything are wasting their time.
 

palmerjrusa

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And why should they?

Think of it: in reality, what is the future of "scanner hobbyists"? Not only are the police restricting monitoring of their systems (and, rightfully so), but most other public service operations are, too. And those who are not may well be on the verge of buying into the next generation of proprietary systems developed by the "named" radio manufacturers. And we really don't know what those new proprietary systems will be. Will they be too expensive to put into a scanner, boosting up the price of the radios far beyond what a "hobbyist" wants to pay (and if the manufacturer even license access to the system) for a very limited amount of monitoring, such as school buses and store security?

As I said elsewhere, don't expect Uniden, or anyone else, to put too much future effort into their radios. I'm sure they have other products worthy of their efforts which don't have such a narrow market.

There will come a time, very shortly, that, if you want to monitor an agency, etc, you're going to have to belong to the agency (paid or volly) and hope they issue you a radio. And, even then, with limited access.

Those who are beating a drum thinking that they have a Constitutional right to monitor anything are wasting their time.
"Those who are beating a drum thinking that they have a Constitutional right to monitor anything are wasting their time."

I don't know anyone who thinks they have a right to monitor "everything", however, there's certainly a strong argument to be made, in the name of transparency and accountability, to keep most transmissions from public agencies available for scrutiny to the media and general public.
 

CycleSycho

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:) palmerjrusa, I believe your point is in one respect valid. Those who spend a large amount of money like to be on an inside track and are very curious what goes on around them. Sometimes the point of the negative posts are that spending sums of monies for high cost equipment is one of diminishing results, any right or privilege to access to public airways (although there is a reason for preventing fraudulent recordkeeping or negating liabilities in cases where a lawsuit is generated) cannot be tackled by just you or I. Also, there is the thought that since PUBLIC monies (TAXPAYERS $$$) are used to purchase the systems used, there may be an argument that this should be allowed access (BUT, again, that liability issue, do you see?). It IS a sticky issue, but the jist of the argument is the dwindling ability to ACCESS (the hobby) and spending large sums of money for access to publicly funded systems and public access airways. No one I know of has the $ to challenge this portion of the encryption of publicly funded hardware in these trying times (of) that often used but rarely appropriate coined phrase of 'Homeland Security' (like they used and continue to use 'National Security'). This issue does generate a lot of controversy, and it will continue to do so. What I believe, is open up the airways for anyone except when a covert operation/secret private reason exists. Publicly funded radio systems for the most part, should be unencrypted PERIOD. :)


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Citywide173

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And why should they?

Think of it: in reality, what is the future of "scanner hobbyists"? Not only are the police restricting monitoring of their systems (and, rightfully so), but most other public service operations are, too. And those who are not may well be on the verge of buying into the next generation of proprietary systems developed by the "named" radio manufacturers. And we really don't know what those new proprietary systems will be. Will they be too expensive to put into a scanner, boosting up the price of the radios far beyond what a "hobbyist" wants to pay (and if the manufacturer even license access to the system) for a very limited amount of monitoring, such as school buses and store security?
The move to UHF-T was going to be the end of the hobby

The advent of trunking was going to be the end of the hobby

The advent of Digital was going to be the end of the hobby........

Yes, encryption is ending the hobby for many, not all. Some police departments have no need or reason to encrypt and have made decisions not to (espescially when they realize that they would be shutting out their own EMS.)

I do fire scene photography and do not rely on the police that much outside of work (I may have been the one that pointed out that EMS would be shut out if the PD went encrypted.) Where I am, very few PDs and almost no FDs have gone encrypted or plan to. I feel sorry for those that get locked out, but the hobby will be around for some time in my neck of the woods.
 
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