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2003 Chevy Trailblazer Rear Fuse Box

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kingtrid

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I did a search and couldn't find any info on this so I appologize if this has previously been covered.

I currently drive a 2003 Chevy Trailblazer and am looking to install a Yaesu FT8800R in it.
I am looking at installing the main unit in the rear cargo area and using the separation kit to mount the head unit up front.

The truck has a fuse box with terminals (look like battery posts) underneath the back seat and I am wondering if I can run power and ground to these posts, or if it truly needs to be ran to the battery?
 

OpSec

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The only issue -may- be the introduction of RFI but for a low current install like an FT8800R (~15A) that location should be just fine. Run the ground wire to a god chassis ground and you'll be good to go.

If the RFI becomes an issue, try a ferrite core or then move the positive wire to the battery.
 

n8emr

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stateboy said:
Run the ground wire to a god chassis ground and you'll be good to go.
Seeking devine help to keep RFI out out of the radio?
 

kingtrid

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Thanks!

Thanks guys for all the replies!

I went ahead with the install today but ran into a problem. My problem is that I am not sure how good my ground is. My plan is to re-run the cables to the battery next weekend, but I am now wondering - what happens if I use the radio until next weekend? If the ground is not good, will I fry the radio? Will the car start on fire? Will it just not work?

If any of you are familiar with a '03 trailblazer, I bolted the ground to the large 1/2" bolt on the rear right drivers seat track. I got most of the paint off, but I am not sure if the little that remains will affect the connection.

Is it safe to use the radio if I am not confident on the ground?
 

RolnCode3

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Why are you unsure how good your ground is? Is the radio malfunctioning?

Did you check the potential difference with a digital voltmeter?

Just because a part is made of metal doesn't mean it's grounded. Those seat nuts often have a nylon insert inside to keep it from loosening.
 

OpSec

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kingtrid said:
Thanks guys for all the replies!

I went ahead with the install today but ran into a problem. My problem is that I am not sure how good my ground is. My plan is to re-run the cables to the battery next weekend, but I am now wondering - what happens if I use the radio until next weekend? If the ground is not good, will I fry the radio? Will the car start on fire? Will it just not work?

If any of you are familiar with a '03 trailblazer, I bolted the ground to the large 1/2" bolt on the rear right drivers seat track. I got most of the paint off, but I am not sure if the little that remains will affect the connection.

Is it safe to use the radio if I am not confident on the ground?
Move the ground directly to body sheetmetal if you are concerned about it. Check the voltage drop across that body mount and if it's more than a 1/10th of a volt, move the ground wire.
 

key2_altfire

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Move the ground directly to body sheetmetal if you are concerned about it.
Agreed, this is the best route.

If you do decide to connect the pos and neg terminals directly to the main battery, be sure to have a fuse in the negative wire. If you do not, and the vehicle's main ground strap fails, then your radio will quite possibly become the new ground path.

Fusing the neg line will help prevent fireballing your radio when you hit the starter switch. ;-)
 
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