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50 W Handhedl?

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jonwienke

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No. first off, the battery required would too big and heavy to be practical, and second, 50W of RF in contact with your body can cause RF burns and other radio frequency exposure health problems. For most frequencies, 5-10 watts within arm's length is about the limit for safe daily exposure.

Mobile radios can get away with much higher power because you're shielded by the vehicle body if the antenna is outside and you are inside the vehicle. But you want to stand back from the antenna if there is any possibility the radio might transmit.
 

jwt873

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A Chinese outfit called Luiton makes a 25 Watt dual-band handheld. Luiton 25W two way radio - LUITON But it's not legal for use as a GMRS radio.

As jonwienke points out, there are concerns with having your nose near an antenna that's radiating that much power. Plus, at 50 Watts, your battery life would be pretty poor.
 

jonwienke

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That thing is scary, I could see using it as a HT/mobile combo. I definitely wouldn't want to run it on high power handheld.
 

Rred

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The FCC generally limits h/t's to 6 watts to prevent naïve customers from frying their brains. Or the brains of bystanders.

If you want a 50W "handheld" you buy a 50W mobile radio, and a suitable battery, install it in a "man pack" (backpack or chest pack) and run an antenna pole up clear above head and shoulders, typically a 1/4 wave or 1/2 wave vertical.
 

KC4RAF

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Just as Rred posted. They are not sold here in the US. Such a wild animal wouldn't take too long to start frying the brain. They are made for max of 6 watts so people who DON'T KNOW any better;..... well you get the idea. (there could be some that radiate a few watts more, but if you want to have a brain that will function later on, stick with the legal limits.)
 

rwier

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No. first off, the battery required would too big and heavy to be practical, and second, 50W of RF in contact with your body can cause RF burns and other radio frequency exposure health problems. For most frequencies, 5-10 watts within arm's length is about the limit for safe daily exposure.

Mobile radios can get away with much higher power because you're shielded by the vehicle body if the antenna is outside and you are inside the vehicle. But you want to stand back from the antenna if there is any possibility the radio might transmit.
Electricity is my worst subject, lol. Back about 1954, myself and a couple of neighborhood guys were "playing" at something resembling today's parkour activity. One of the "obstacles" was a old Chevy coupe owned by the older brother of one of the "players". He would sit in the car and talk to folks around the world. At the right rear bumper was a very tall antenna with a giant (18" x 3") coil spring that allowed the antenna to flex a bunch.

The radio guy was in the car operating the radio when I came from the front and basically leaped to the hood and then the roof with two big "high steps". This propelled me over the trunk of the car a considerable speed. Having no knowledge of what was going on, I grabbed at the antenna for stability as I flew over the back of the car.

There was a bright flash and a sound like a nearby lightning strike. The next thing I remember, I was standing in the middle of the street, feeling like I had lost about 90% of my mental facilities. I had no idea that a vehicle parked in a driveway could pose a significant electrical threat. I mean, it is only 12 volts, right?
 

W8RMH

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It's not the voltage it is the wattage. I remember back in my CB days a guy had a 200+ watt linear amplifier in his car and it melted a fiberglass antenna like a crayon under a blowtorch.
 

Rred

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"It's not the voltage it is the wattage."
Ever see a spark gap ladder, or a Tesla coil?
It IS the voltage, more so than the wattage. Wattage may generate the heat to slag things down, but the voltage will jump an air gap, and the higher the voltage is, the further it will jump out and over to a convenient ground. Higher voltage means a better chance it can reach and grab you, leaving internal RF burns and other damage.

You don't want to exceed safe limits o either voltage or wattage, and if you have to ask "How much is safe?" then the answer is, "Kids, don't try this at home." RTFM first.
 

jwt873

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You can't directly compare Volts and Watts because you can't have Watts without Volts. (You also have to have Ohms and Amps in order to have Watts).

If you know the Voltage and the Current in a circuit, you calculate Watts by multiplying volts times amps.

1 volt at 100 Amps = 100 Watts
100 volts at 1 Amp = 100 Watts

Is it the voltage causing the Watts or is it the Current causing Watts?

You have to consider the load. If your load (the resistance in the circuit) can only handle 50 watts, then both the above instances will cause it to overheat and fail.
 

jonwienke

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Watts is the energy transferred to the load. Voltage is what overcomes the resistance of one's skin to push the energy into/through the body. 12V isn't enough voltage to push a harmful amount of energy through the skin unless your skin is wet. But pushing 50W through a 50Ω load (your typical antenna impedance) requires 50V, which is enough to push a painful or harmful amount of power through the skin.

Given the description of the antenna, you probably had an encounter with a HF rig running 100+ watts.
 

prcguy

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And if you grab the base of a 1/4 wave whip the voltage will be near the 50 ohm value and if you grab it near the top the voltage will be much higher.
prcguy

Watts is the energy transferred to the load. Voltage is what overcomes the resistance of one's skin to push the energy into/through the body. 12V isn't enough voltage to push a harmful amount of energy through the skin unless your skin is wet. But pushing 50W through a 50Ω load (your typical antenna impedance) requires 50V, which is enough to push a painful or harmful amount of power through the skin.

Given the description of the antenna, you probably had an encounter with a HF rig running 100+ watts.
 

slicerwizard

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But pushing 50W through a 50Ω load (your typical antenna impedance) requires 50V, which is enough to push a painful or harmful amount of power through the skin.
50V is on the low end of painful/harmful and nowhere near enough to cause rwier's experience. You're also ignoring the fact that RF is AC, so peak voltage is not 50V in your scenario.
 
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