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70 Ft Long Wire

bumper41

Bumper41
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While, I agree, a 9:1 balun can be used for optimum performance he shouldn't have a problem picking up signals with the center connector hooked directly up to the end of a 70' antenna. Two of my end fed wire antennas work fine this way.

My questions to the op would be:
Did you strip the insulation off of the wire antenna and physically connect it to the coax?
If you did, did you hook it up to the center conductor of the coax or the shield of it or both?
Hooking it up to the center conductor and leaving the shield of the coax open would be proper.
Hooking it up to the shield or both would short it to ground(I had a friend of mine do this).

You also didn't mention what receiver you are using.
If you are using a portable receiver, 70' of antenna could be too much for it, zapping the front end. Some portables have protection for this while others do not.

Jim

Sorry Tom, your post wasn't up when I started posting.
Hi, my receiver is a DX-300.. In response to your check list. Confirmed that I stripped the Long Wire at the connection and connected to the center solid wire of the coax... I soldered this connection.. I grounded the coax shield to an earth ground rod before the coax enters the house. GE
 

majoco

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This receiver is like the the early Yaesu FRG-7 - do you know how to tune the radio? It's not easy like a 'normal' receiver. I bought an FRG-7 a few years ago for spares at a local auction for NZ$10 as it was labelled 'doesn't work'. Well, it worked perfectly - in fact better than the one I already had!
If all else fails - RTFM.
 

ka3jjz

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Much as I hate to say it, according to reviews on eHam, this radio is so old that it may need some serious overhaul (new electrolytic caps, etc.) to put it into working shape. It is also very sensitive to static buildup which may have blown the front end (much like the well respected Sony ICF-2010). Have you tried tuning your local MW station? If you can't hear it, my guess is that the radio is a junker.

I hope I'm wrong....Mike
 

a29zuk

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SE Michigan
Now we are getting somewhere. Sounds like you have the antenna hooked up correctly.

Like Martin said above it must be tuned correctly. My brother had one of these when they first came out.
Make sure the preselector setting coincides with the frequency you are trying to listen to. It is a pretty sensitive receiver but a lot of local BCB stations can be heard up in the shortwave frequencies. In that respect it wasn't a very good receiver. If you live out in a rural area it might be okay.

I'm hoping Mike is wrong , too;)

Good luck,
Jim
 

bumper41

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Much as I hate to say it, according to reviews on eHam, this radio is so old that it may need some serious overhaul (new electrolytic caps, etc.) to put it into working shape. It is also very sensitive to static buildup which may have blown the front end (much like the well respected Sony ICF-2010). Have you tried tuning your local MW station? If you can't hear it, my guess is that the radio is a junker.

I hope I'm wrong....Mike
Hi, The crazy thing is this radio was purchased by the original owner back in the 80's and was never used. Actuially when I bought it, the box was still sealed and the radio was packaged in its styrofoam. Absolutely mint. I probably just don'y know how to tune it yet. Thanks Greg
 

bumper41

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This receiver is like the the early Yaesu FRG-7 - do you know how to tune the radio? It's not easy like a 'normal' receiver. I bought an FRG-7 a few years ago for spares at a local auction for NZ$10 as it was labelled 'doesn't work'. Well, it worked perfectly - in fact better than the one I already had!
If all else fails - RTFM.
You are probably right. Either I have a little to learn and maybe there just is nothing to hear right now.
 

bumper41

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Now we are getting somewhere. Sounds like you have the antenna hooked up correctly.

Like Martin said above it must be tuned correctly. My brother had one of these when they first came out.
Make sure the preselector setting coincides with the frequency you are trying to listen to. It is a pretty sensitive receiver but a lot of local BCB stations can be heard up in the shortwave frequencies. In that respect it wasn't a very good receiver. If you live out in a rural area it might be okay.

I'm hoping Mike is wrong , too;)

Good luck,
Jim
 

bumper41

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Sorry, I accidently replyed a couple time.... Like I was telling Mike, the radio is unused.. I know that seems impossible, but true. One thing I was doing wrong was not matching the pre-selector with the tuner.... Probably would help if I knew what band width is relative to the 70ft longwire and when I should be listening. I guess thats what makes this a hobby... I got some learnin' to do.
 

a29zuk

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While your 70' antenna will work better on some frequencies than others it's not super critical as it is signal to noise ratio. You should be able to hear signals on most frequencies.

A general rule of thumb is above 10mhz for daytime listening and below 10mhz for nighttime listening. Right now we are at the low end of the sun spot cycle so daytime listening on the higher frequencies suffer.

If you have a local AM station near you try matching your preselector and frequency to it. That will confirm that your receiver is working okay. The AM band will open up to more distant stations at nighttime.

Jim
 

TailGator911

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Agreed about the FRG-7. I sometimes put mine to the test when I get a good strong signal on my R8600 or R75 just to see if the old battle axe still has it, and it continues to impress. You have to know just how to tweak it, as there is a 'touch' to it. Not quite PBT, but close ;)


JD
kf4anc
 

bumper41

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While your 70' antenna will work better on some frequencies than others it's not super critical as it is signal to noise ratio. You should be able to hear signals on most frequencies.

A general rule of thumb is above 10mhz for daytime listening and below 10mhz for nighttime listening. Right now we are at the low end of the sun spot cycle so daytime listening on the higher frequencies suffer.

If you have a local AM station near you try matching your preselector and frequency to it. That will confirm that your receiver is working okay. The AM band will open up to more distant stations at nighttime.

Jim
Thanks Jim. I will try tuning to an AM station, never thought about that
 

bumper41

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Hi, good news and thanks to all for your feedback. As it turns out Once I worked the Pre select, Tuner and fine tune. I was able to finally start to pull in stations. I also did not have the atten set to 0 which really opened up everything. I am on my way now. Thanks again.
 

bumper41

Bumper41
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Messages
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Boyceville, Wisconsin
While your 70' antenna will work better on some frequencies than others it's not super critical as it is signal to noise ratio. You should be able to hear signals on most frequencies.

A general rule of thumb is above 10mhz for daytime listening and below 10mhz for nighttime listening. Right now we are at the low end of the sun spot cycle so daytime listening on the higher frequencies suffer.

If you have a local AM station near you try matching your preselector and frequency to it. That will confirm that your receiver is working okay. The AM band will open up to more distant stations at nighttime.

Jim
Jim, Thanks.. I tuned into 830 which is out of Minneapolis St Paul. I began to work the switched and tuner(s). Whalla ... I figured it out.. It was operator error all along. Thanks for the help. Greg
 

krokus

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.... Probably would help if I knew what band width is relative to the 70ft longwire and when I should be listening. I guess thats what makes this a hobby... I got some learnin' to do.
First, glad to read that you have figured out some of the controls, and started receiving signals. Using WWV & CHU as tests is a good idea, too.

The bandwidth of the radio is not a function of the antenna. The antenna does have an effective bandwidth, which is more critical when transmitting than receiving, and called Q. (Which is tied to the diameter, for a given length.)
 

majoco

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I've always thought that the labelling of the "ATT" switch on the Frog was wrong - why would a switch be labelled as "DX" when it puts in a 10dB pad and a "Local" transmitter would have to be in my backyard to get through! Interestingly, the schematic show the switch is labelled "off" instead of "nor".
 
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