• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

72.640? Who is the user?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Flatshovel

Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2004
Messages
145
Location
North Carolina
Hi all,
I was browsing throught the fcc frequency lookup tonight and finally have found out the frequencys to the tower down from my house. The freqs according to the fcc dababase are 72.640 and 72.740? Who would use these freqs? Are these in FM mode? I will punch them into my Icom R-2 and see what happens. Just curious, any body got any ideas?

Thanks,
Joey
 

rcvmo

Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2004
Messages
433
Location
Romulus, Mi.
Looks like remote receiver link channels. They use those freq.s for point to point comss, plus paging channels for tornado/early warning sirens up here.
rcvmo
 

jeffmulter

Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2001
Messages
1,456
Location
Fort Mill, S.C. (just south of Charlotte, N.C.)
>> Who would use these freqs?

Copeland Communications and Electronics in Elizabeth City. They are a member of the American Association of Paging Carriers, so I presume "paging" is among the services they offer.

>> Are these in FM mode?

Yes. Licensed for analog voice and / or data.

The frequencies are used in conjunction with a network of repeaters on 462.875 MHz, as well as a low-power UHF splinter frequency at one of the 6 licensed sites.

You can tell when a frequency is licensed as a "link" between two points by looking in the "class" section of the online license. "FX1" represents a fixed link. I'm not sure if the FCC rules require a directional antenna be used for fixed links ( ... anyone know ? ... ), but they usually are used to achieve the best point-to-point signal with the least amount of power.


Jeff Multer
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top