WS1040: 800 MHz antenna

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Mike1HD1

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Does a 800 MHz antenna actually improve the performance of my WS 1040 ?
Is it worth the $30 to replace the factory antenna?
 

ScannerSK

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Gilcrest, CO
Way back with the PRO-96, I tested the rubber ducky that came with that scanner against the RadioShack 800 MHz antenna and the difference was very noticeable. The 800 MHz antenna added 1-2 signal bars on most weak systems and noticeably improved overall reception. Ever since then, I have always used the RadioShack 800 MHz antenna on all my handhelds which have a primary use in the 800 MHz spectrum.

The antennas are currently $23.99 online and cheaper in many stores due to going out of business clearances.
RadioShack 800 MHz Antenna

Shawn
 

SCPD

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The correct answer .. "it depends on what you want to listen to"

If you want to listen to 800 MHz signals .. then an 800 MHz antenna would be the correct choice.

If you want to listen to VHF or UHF signals .. YMMV.

I personally use an 800 MHz antenna .. custom made 1/4 wave or Larsen Kulrod. I should note .. there are no Radio Shack stores here and have not been for a long long time.

However .. for general scanning, I use a VHF/UHF (2m / 70cm amateur antenna) .. which does very well on 800 MHz as well. I have no issues as the 800 MHz signals I want to listen to are very strong.

The only way to tell .. use an antenna analyzer. Here is the one I use.
https://radioworld.ca/rigex-aa1400

But to arbitrarily say that an 800 MHz *radio shack or otherwise, is the antenna to go to instead of a stock antenna is a rather wishy washy answer.
 

DJ11DLN

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Mudhole, IN
As per the post above, they work very well, for a rubber duck, if you aren't swamped with RF. If that's the case, or you spend your time in sight of one or more cell towers, then no antenna is going to work well, the radio's front end is overloaded and it just won't function.

But I'm very happy with mine, it (they, I have several) even works acceptably in a vehicle that I haven't gotten around to working up the courage to drop the headliner and install a real antenna. And performance on VHF-Hi/UHF is surprisingly good as well.
 

CycleSycho

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Central South Carolina
:wink: For sure, not everyone has the ability to purchase/use a $1500.00 antenna analyzer. I find signal propagation/interference too varied and widespread (too many factors plus multiple sources of RFI), to effectively answer generalized wideband receiver problems and questions. Trial/error and experiences localized from other members usually are the best source of good information, which is why members are generally directed to their local area's forum. Ppl who purchase expensive test equipment like antenna analyzers, usually use them in their business OR have an awful lot of $ to burn for their toys. In the analog sphere (generally) it was a lot easier to snatch systems, digital has made it much harder to pin down. Just my $0.02 cents worth. :wink:
 

SCPD

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:wink: For sure, not everyone has the ability to purchase/use a $1500.00 antenna analyzer. I find signal propagation/interference too varied and widespread (too many factors plus multiple sources of RFI), to effectively answer generalized wideband receiver problems and questions. Trial/error and experiences localized from other members usually are the best source of good information, which is why members are generally directed to their local area's forum. Ppl who purchase expensive test equipment like antenna analyzers, usually use them in their business OR have an awful lot of $ to burn for their toys. In the analog sphere (generally) it was a lot easier to snatch systems, digital has made it much harder to pin down. Just my $0.02 cents worth. :wink:
I was not all that serious about the analyzer. However .. if you have one that you can use, that is the best way to truly test an antenna, as far as where it is resonant and such. But only testing with a descent receiver and calibrated s-meter is how you can tell if one antenna works better than another. That is why I love my Icom R7000.

The best answer to the ? .. if you want the best reception, use an antenna designed for the band you want to receive. An 800 MHz antenna .. will obviously be best on 800 MHz.

Multi band antennas .. everything from a discone to other types of antennas, ie .. Larsen Tri band. It all depends on how you want to use them ... portable, mobile or base. The question is very vague and impossible to answer without a lot more information.
 
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