9040 LSB: Unid Morse Code and Spanish

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brandon

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9040 LSB, unknown morse code and occasional Spanish language male voice. Any idea what this could be? I logged this the other night around 0310z. I don't know if the voice is related but found the combination to be interesting.

Audio clip: 9040-Unid-Spanish-and-Morse-Code.mp3
 

westli

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The morse sounds like 5-figure cut numbers and the freq has been used by the Cubans for numbers stations for years. I don't know if they ever used it during the 0300z hour, however.

The Spanish voice is interesting. I don't know where it came from.

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bigblue2

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He said, Hello Hello zero eight zero eight hello hello then morse code.. I have Audacity 1.3 software. Anybody who knows how to operate this software and maybe I can decode them but only the equivalent not the decoded numbers or letters.
 

westli

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What do you want Audacity to do? It's an audio editing program. It can record and playback and change how the audio sounds. I use it quite a bit. What else do you need?
 

bigblue2

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Actually I think Audacity is not the one I need after reading your post. I have a plug that fits into the socket of my radio speaker and can connect into the microphone socket of my computer. I want to get the CW messages from my radio and read them through a Morse code website. I got a plug where two plugs can fit in. The problem is that it creates a disturbing creaking sound. Well, anyway, I am ok so far as long as I use 1 plug plugged into the socket. I will seek your advise once a problem comes up. Thank you..
 

k9rzz

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A * ----
B --- * * *
C --- * --- *


It's beauty is in it's simplicity. Why make it complicated by involving computers? Are the spies in the field relying on software and computers to give them the message?

 

W2NJS

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Forget about reading that code because it won't mean anything to you. It consists of five-letter groups and without the key you'll never know what they're saying. To put it another way, what you're hearing is not language, and not words, just five-letter code groups.
 

bigblue2

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It's beauty is in it's simplicity. Why make it complicated by involving computers? Are the spies in the field relying on software and computers to give them the message?

k9rzz, can you recommend to me a scanner that can scan longwave and shortwave below 30mhz? I have a scanner but it starts at 25 mhz. I have a scan button on my ICOM R-75. Will that do? Or shall I buy a receiver that covers 100 khz-1Ghz with scanner?
 

k9rzz

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k9rzz, can you recommend to me a scanner that can scan longwave and shortwave below 30mhz? I have a scanner but it starts at 25 mhz. I have a scan button on my ICOM R-75. Will that do? Or shall I buy a receiver that covers 100 khz-1Ghz with scanner?
Scanning works for VHF and above where there is no noise to break the squelch except for the voices of the stations you want to hear. Scanning of HF and LW channels works to some degree, but there is so much noise other than voice to break the squelch that it really doesn't work the same. The scan keeps getting stopped on stuff you could care less about.

Short answer: You *can* scan some quiet HF freqs, but mostly you're going to have to turn the tuning knob manually.

Sorry!
 

N2UJZ

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Scanning with the R75

The best way to scan using the R75 is to not use the squelch, but use your ears. You'll have to set it to .1 kHz tuning steps or smaller & set the scan speed to slow (also make sure it's in VFO mode.) Then when you push SCAN and the radio will scan up. It won't stop automatically but you can listen as it scans through & stop it when you hear a signal. For years I thought the scan function was useless on HF until I figured this out. -Justin
 

Token

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Yeah, have to agree with what k9rzz said. I have found that automated scanning is just not a very useful tool below 30 MHz or in any band that does not use FM or AM as a primary mode of transmission. As N2UJZ said you can scan with the squelch open and in small tuning steps, that way you can hear as the receiver sweeps through a signal, you can then stop the scan and manually fine tune the signal, but I really don’t find this any more useful than manually tuning (except of course in scan you do not have to do anything but listen for periods of time). Twist that big knob in the middle of the radio, tune that thing around. Over time you learn technique to manually tuning, how fast to tune, things like that, depending on what your intended reception targets are.

Learn what portions of the bands support what kinds of communication, maritime, aviation, military, etc.

Learn what modes of operation (AM, FM, SSB, CW, etc) you can expect to be associated with what types of service. Examples are that AM is used mostly by SW broadcast stations, FM is very rare on HF except above 25 MHz, SSB (either USB or LSB) is most common for voice communications throughout the HF spectrum, and CW is mostly used by ham radio operators, although some maritime and other utility type transmissions are still in CW. Digital modes have largely replaced what were the primary CW services of 25 or 30 years ago.

Learn some of the basics of propagation (you don't need the science of what is going on, unless you want to know it, just what happens with regards to signals), i.e. in general lower frequencies work better at night and higher frequencies work better in the daylight hours. A good starting point (rule of thumb only) is from 12000 kHz and down at night and 9000 kHz and up during the daylight, but these are not hard limits and morning and evening times can blur this a lot. Learn how propagation affects what you might hear on what frequency, for example in the evening just before your local sundown you can expect more lower frequency signals from the east and more higher frequency ones from the west.

The world of HF is not like the world of scanners on VHF/UHF/SHF. It is a significantly different beast.

Antenna, antenna, antenna, and location. In the world of scanners and VHF and up you often can get away with some very broadband and compact antennas (broadband and compact are generally not very efficient), depending on your location and services around your area. In the world of HF that is seldom a possibility. In HF a rinky-dink antenna will yield poor results with even the best receivers money can buy. A person with a $150 used Kenwood R2000 and a well installed 100 foot random wire in a quiet location will hear far more than a person with a $4500 Ten-Tec RX-340 and a 10 foot chunk of wire tacked to the wall above the florescent desk lamp.



T!
 
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