A question about Ham Operation TX ( Transmitting )

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billcox5

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Hello Radio Reference Family,

I have a question that I couldn't find an answer online. I don't have any kind of license yet, so I am just curious about ham radio operation. I understand if you want to listen to ham operators, you would choose USB or LSB on the receiver.

Here is my question, on a transceiver prior to transmitting, do you need to choose a mode like in above prior to going on air or is it automatic?

What I mean by automatic is for example, if you want to transmit on the 40 meter band, does the transceiver puts you in LSB mode automatically? And vice-versa, if you want to transmit on the 20 meter band, does the transceiver puts you on USB mode automatically? Or must it be done manually, you'd have to choose a mode first?

PS: If you don't choose USB or LSB mode prior to transmit does it defaults to AM mode?

I appreciate any comments and clarifications.. Thanks
 

sloop

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Amateur radio operators- hams - can operate any mode they choose. There are certain frequencies that are designated as cow, data, or ssb only. As far as the lbs, usb settings, it depend on the radio. Some you have to set and the memory retains the setting while others are preset and you have the option of changing the setting. As far as am mode, yes it is still used though not as much. Hope that this helps.
 

jwt873

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What mode you use depends what band you're using, what class of license you have and where you're located. You don't have your location listed in your personal information, but I'll assume you're in the USA.

Here's a chart of bands and modes used in the USA. http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Regulatory/Band Chart/Hambands_color.pdf

And.,. Most modern HF radios will automatically select the correct sideband for you as you change bands.
 

ladn

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As jwt873 said, most modern HF radios select the correct sideband automatically. As far as AM usage, it's usually relegated to specific frequencies or sub-bands within the HF bands so as to lessen interference with sideband users who are now in the majority.
 

robertmac

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And most of this will be explained when taking the course. Attend a local club meeting in your area and I am sure there will be a number of Elmers available to show the proper operating procedures. Although one can learn the answer back, on air one can usually tell who has done this versus those that took a course.
 

bharvey2

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Mar 12, 2014
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Hello Radio Reference Family,

I have a question that I couldn't find an answer online. I don't have any kind of license yet, so I am just curious about ham radio operation. I understand if you want to listen to ham operators, you would choose USB or LSB on the receiver.

Here is my question, on a transceiver prior to transmitting, do you need to choose a mode like in above prior to going on air or is it automatic?

What I mean by automatic is for example, if you want to transmit on the 40 meter band, does the transceiver puts you in LSB mode automatically? And vice-versa, if you want to transmit on the 20 meter band, does the transceiver puts you on USB mode automatically? Or must it be done manually, you'd have to choose a mode first?

PS: If you don't choose USB or LSB mode prior to transmit does it defaults to AM mode?

I appreciate any comments and clarifications.. Thanks
There are a lot of "it depends" going on here. The method of communication is governed by many things including the radio, the band and even the time of day in some cases. Some radios allow you to select the mode (AM, FM, LSB USB, etc.- most common in HF) while others are mode specific. With HF, there aren't always rules that state what you can use but sometimes it may just be common practice.

If this interests you, perhaps a good start may be the ARRL Technician Class study guide. If you don't have any electronics or radio background, you'll likely have questions. A local HAM radio club is a good place to visit for that.
 
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