Air to Air 122.750

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Scorch

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I've read in aviation forums that this freq is for air to air comms. Here in Ramona I've been picking up a LOT of comms on it but they sound like air to ground conversations. RR database does not list this freq on any of the airports I've checked. Does anyone have any more info on this freq?
 

inigo88

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122.75 is the civilian fixed-wing air to air common. Its usage varies geographically and some areas are very professional with many pilots participating and making traffic reports, while others simply use it as an air-to-air chit-chat channel (effectively shutting down the frequency for hundreds of miles). Fortunately in the San Diego area the former is true, and all the local flight schools have a sort of informal agreement to utilize this frequency to make regular traffic reports based on standardized areas. I don't remember all of them off the top of my head, but some examples are "San Diego Coastal", "San Diego Northeastern", etc. 123.025 MHz serves the same purpose but for helicopters at low altitude.
 

Scorch

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Most of the comms I hear are from aircraft announcing their intention to perform aerobatics over El Cap reservoir. I could swear they're getting a ground comm confirmation though.
 
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N739MH

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Being a student pilot in San Diego, I use 122.75 every time I fly.
It is used in regions such as: San Diego Coastal, San Diego East, and San Diego North.
Yes, it is true that we use it to announce aerobatic intentions, but it goes beyond that. It also is not exclusively for fixed-wing aircraft, because both fixed-wing and rotor craft need to know each others intentions.
VFR traffic generally uses it to let other aircraft know what their intentions are. ex: "San Diego Coastal, Cessna 739MH, over Del Mar 3,500ft northbound, San Diego Coastal." or, "San Diego East, Piper Warrior 223F, over El Cap 5,700ft stalls, San Diego East."
If there is another aircraft in the vicinity, and they heard the transmission, they will respond with their information, and coordinate with the pilot to ensure they remain clear of each other.
Sometimes, you may hear chit-chat between pilots, but most are kind enough not to hog the frequency or step on other pilots. You will also hear pilots who are flying in formation using this to communicate with each other.

Also, 122.75 is only an Air to Air frequency. There is no ground entity that uses it to communicate with aircraft. From my experience with an aviation scanner, the reception of this channel can be very poor, as its not bouncing off any repeaters or ATCT's.

Hope this helps clear it up,
seven-tree-niner-mike-hotel
 

inigo88

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Being a student pilot in San Diego, I use 122.75 every time I fly.
It is used in regions such as: San Diego Coastal, San Diego East, and San Diego North.
Yes, it is true that we use it to announce aerobatic intentions, but it goes beyond that. It also is not exclusively for fixed-wing aircraft, because both fixed-wing and rotor craft need to know each others intentions.
Regarding 122.75 being used by helicopters, while I agree with you in theory that it's better for everyone to talk to each other (and I'm glad they monitor it in our area), the FCC has different ideas. Refer to Table 4-1-3 "Other Frequency Usage Designated by FCC" in the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) (page 4-1-7).

In that table it states:

122.750 - Air-to-air communication (private fixed wing aircraft).
123.025 - Air-to-air communications (general aviation helicopters).

From what I understand the 123.025 helicopter frequency only applies at or below 2000 ft MSL. If you take a look at the "LA West Heli" helicopter route chart on skyvector you'll see a box just off the Palos Verdes peninsula that says "Caution: At or below 2000' pilots are encouraged to make regular position reports on 123.025." But again this only counts for helos, not fixed wing.

While these are the only two air-air freqs in theory, there are actually tons of them used in local practice areas. A lot of them are listed for the busier ones in the back of the A/FD near all the special notices (for example, the LA Harbor practice area).

Also, 122.75 is only an Air to Air frequency. There is no ground entity that uses it to communicate with aircraft. From my experience with an aviation scanner, the reception of this channel can be very poor, as its not bouncing off any repeaters or ATCT's.
Correct. Any advisory frequency (CTAF/UNICOM/Air-to-Air, etc) will never have a ground base station associated with it unless you count the UNICOM operator at some FBOs, so communications are received line of site. Even when you talk to ATC there are no repeaters used, just RCO/RCAG remote base radio towers used by ATC to reach you line of site.

Hope that helps! :) (I'm a rated PPL FWIW.)

P.S. How do you like Plus One Flyers? I checked them out but the initiation fee + monthly dues didn't seem economically feasible unless one was doing a lot of flying in a short period of time.
 
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