Airport alert codes. Anyone have a list?

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rasj

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Last night I heard Spartanburg County dispatch toning off fire departments on an "Alert 2 Level 5" at GSP. I have been unable to find much on the internet about what the alert and levels mean. Does anyone have a list that they would like to share?
 

firefighter89

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Alert 2 is used when a plane has an in flight emergency.
Alert 3 is used when a plane has actually crashed.

I don't know what each level means but I do know that higher the level, the more passengers on the plane.
 

rasj

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Thanks for the reply. I found these while searching. I assume they are all about the same, but these were taken from other state's/counties.

Alert 1 Airport (Possible Crash)
Alert 2 Airport (Probable Crash)
Alert 3 Airport (Crash/Aircraft Incident)
_______________________________________

ALERT 1 A plane in the air has minor electrical/mechanical problems. Units standby at fire station.
ALERT 2 A plane in the air has major electrical/mechanical problems. Units standby at runway.
ALERT 3 A plane has crashed at or near the airport.
ALERT 4 Hijacking, bomb threats or hazmat problems.

Still haven't found anything on levels, but will keep searching. If I find a list, I will make sure to post it.

EDIT:
Well, I did a search here and found...
Level 1) 1-2 Souls
Level 2) 3-10
Level 3) 11-25
Level 4) 26-50
Level 5) 51+

Compiled from the posts in this thread
 
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Stavro35

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ALERT 1 A plane in the air has minor electrical/mechanical problems. Units standby at fire station.
ALERT 2 A plane in the air has major electrical/mechanical problems. Units standby at runway.
ALERT 3 A plane has crashed at or near the airport.
ALERT 4 Hijacking, bomb threats or hazmat problems.


I've heard Alert 1, and 2 for SEATAC. At least once a week.
Alert 3. I've heard in my old home town. ( SSI & BQK)

Alert 4. I've never heard .. In Saint simons island Georgia and Brunswick Georgia. "Bravo three red" was used to indicate there was a serious threat to the airport, likely a bomb threat.
 

SCPD

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Inserting my 2 cents... Today, in Jacksonville, Fire Station 16 (Jacksonville International Airport Station) issued an Alert-3 . Now you have to know I was, like, did he just say Alert-3 !? Well he did.

It turned out to be an F-15 with a wheel on fire with some apparently minor extension to the aircraft. No crash. Just a fire.
 

mckinscan

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The Level Numbers is numbers of Passage onboard the aircraft.

Spartanburg


Alerts
- Alert II – Aircraft has declared an emergency, potential for an aircraft crash exists
- Alert III – Aircraft crash has occurred
Levels
- Level 1 – 1 to 5 passengers on board
- Level 2 – 6 to 10 passengers on board
- Level 3 – 11 to 25 passengers on board
- Level 4 – 26 to 50 passengers on board
- Level 5 – 51 or more passengers on board

http://www.spsdonline.org/documents/103.09 Aircraft Emergencies.pdf
 
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kirk23

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FAA ALERTS 1-3

From the F.A.A.

Chapter 2. Administration of Facilities

2-1-10. AIRPORT EMERGENCY PLANS

Alert Phases:*Operations personnel may categorize local alerts if the category or phase designations have been coordinated locally and agreed to. It may be desirable for emergency equipment to be alerted on a standby or ready basis by use of a two-phase or three-phase alert system, but keep these actions as inconspicuous as possible without impairing efficiency. A three-phase alert may be set up as follows:

1. Alert I: Indicating an aircraft approaching the airport is in minor difficulty; e.g., feathered propeller, oil leak, etc. The emergency equipment and crews would standby at the equipment house for further instructions.

2. Alert II: Indicating an aircraft approaching the airport is in major difficulty; e.g., engine on fire, faulty landing gear, no hydraulic pressure, etc. This could mean emergency equipment would proceed to a predetermined location (end of runway, etc.) to await development of the potential emergency.

3. Alert III: Indicating an aircraft involved in an accident on or near the airport and emergency equipment should proceed immediately to the scene.
 
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