American Airlines inflight Frequencies?

1977addis

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Tomorrow ill be flying AA1212 to BWI Airport from DFW i would like to monitor the pilot as he/she calls out the radio when the air craft passes the reporting points along our route. our route will be (KDFW ZACHH3 BSKAT LIT J131 PXV CVG AIR KEMAN ANTHM3 KBWI ) i have also found a map from ARINC that shows all the en route frequencies that are used across the USA, would that be the correct list of frequencies? going off that Map i would be listening on 129.450 is this correct? thanks for your help-W3WIK
 

wscranston

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Looks like you want to monitor following centers: ZFW, ZME, ZID, ZOB, ZDC. Frequencies can be found here.

Be aware, you might not pick up much inside the plane. And the airline might frown on using radios while in flight.
 

N1GAW

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Tomorrow ill be flying AA1212 to BWI Airport from DFW i would like to monitor the pilot as he/she calls out the radio when the air craft passes the reporting points along our route. our route will be (KDFW ZACHH3 BSKAT LIT J131 PXV CVG AIR KEMAN ANTHM3 KBWI ) i have also found a map from ARINC that shows all the en route frequencies that are used across the USA, would that be the correct list of frequencies? going off that Map i would be listening on 129.450 is this correct? thanks for your help-W3WIK
While I do not know AA rules, United does not allow use of radio receivers (scanners included) while in flight. Other airlines have like policies, I'd check with the airline beforehand.
 

ATCTech

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Plus, communications with company operations (not ATC) is typically via VDL/ACARS data link unless it's something out of the ordinary. Routine stuff like off reports, en route position reports, ETA and request for gate number prior to arrival etc. don't usually require a voice call unless the arrival airport ground crew is not the airline's own handlers. (Smaller secondary destination airports.)

For monitoring ATC discretely while on board I'd suggest using the on board WiFi and having a frequency list handy to use LiveATC.net via headphones from your phone/tablet. The scanner will only attract undesirable attention.
 
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alcahuete

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The others have covered it really well. Just to add, the aircraft do not communicate (at least domestic routes) to ATC using ARINC. So those ARINC frequencies are largely useless for your specific flight.

Also, there are not reporting points, at least not in a RADAR environment. You'll get various reporting points on oceanic flights, but your scanner will not help you there, as they use HF. On domestic flights, reporting points don't exist.
 

a417

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I have been on flights where at least some of the air-ground comms are relayed on their audio system....Mike
I remember that, about 20 years ago tho. It was usually the last two channels of the entertainment system. I've flown a lot of different services since then, and haven't seen that provided anymore.
 

ko6jw_2

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The use of scanners or other receivers on aircraft is against FAA regulations no matter what airline you fly on. Besides you're sitting in a flying Faraday cage. You won't hear much even if you were allowed to. Yes, you can take your radio on board. No TSA doesn't care. Just don't use it The theory is that radios could interfere with aircraft systems. Not likely I admit. However, you are in the plane too and you will go down with the ship if something goes wrong. Read a book, listen to music, watch a movie or, God forbid, actually talk to the person next to you.
 

ko6jw_2

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On longer flights the seat back screens can display real time maps of the plane's position. Some cycle between different views. Also display airspeed, altitude, ETA, elapsed time etc. Metric and English units. Much more information than your scanner could give you anyway.

With regard to radio use refer to FAA Circular 91.21-1D. Originally issued in 1961 and expanded to include other electronics. Computers off below 10,000 etc.
 

vagrant

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@ko6jw_2 I did not know that was/is an FAA rule. Do you know when that went into effect, or should I presume it was post 2001?

Faraday cage...indeed it is that. Still, when placed at the window the reception comes back. I have only done that over the USA and while over the Pacific Ocean. Japanese fisherman really like to chat. Of course that damn obstacle finally got in the way.

To the OP, I really had to put the receiver at the window. It will be difficult to hide that.
 

ko6jw_2

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@ko6jw_2 I did not know that was/is an FAA rule. Do you know when that went into effect, or should I presume it was post 2001?

Faraday cage...indeed it is that. Still, when placed at the window the reception comes back. I have only done that over the USA and while over the Pacific Ocean. Japanese fisherman really like to chat. Of course that damn obstacle finally got in the way.

To the OP, I really had to put the receiver at the window. It will be difficult to hide that.
The most current revision is October 2017. This is a extremely complex issue. As you undoubtedly know the rules have changed several times and now allow Bluetooth and Wi-Fi (above 10,000 ft.). Due to the proliferation of wireless devices one can expect more changes. Example: My iPhone in Airplane Mode turns off Bluetooth. Bluetooth is now OK and you can turn it on separately on the phone.

All that aside, the 1961 prohibition on FM receivers is still in effect. What about AM? I would say no at least for VHF because the radio still has a local oscillator. What about an SDR? I don't know. I would not care to debate technicalities with a member of the crew. My main interest is in getting to my destination - not being removed from the plane. While I do travel on longer international flights (pre-COVID), I usually take flights in the 3 to 6 hour range. I can do without a radio for that long. Also, keep in mind that not following the directions of a crew member is a federal offense.
 

chrismol1

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Plus, communications with company operations (not ATC) is typically via VDL/ACARS data link unless it's something out of the ordinary. Routine stuff like off reports, en route position reports, ETA and request for gate number prior to arrival etc. don't usually require a voice call unless the arrival airport ground crew is not the airline's own handlers. (Smaller secondary destination airports.)

For monitoring ATC discretely while on board I'd suggest using the on board WiFi and having a frequency list handy to use LiveATC.net via headphones from your phone/tablet. The scanner will only attract undesirable attention.
For sure, The best part about some scanners these days is they dont have to look like scanners. OP could pop in an SDR to his laptop or a tablet. Im sure theres even small receivers out there the size of a pack of cigarettes with earbuds looks harmless like a MP3 player
 

vagrant

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Even if it was not a federal offense, I am in no mood to suffer the repercussions of not following the directions of the crew. Twice I was asked and told them what it was. It was fun to use a receiver over the Pacific though and test the RX range. Honestly, the chatter one hears over the U.S.A. is not that interesting. For me it was testing the actual RX range inside the flying metal can and how quickly the signal is lost when moving the receiver just a few inches away from the window. As others pointed out, it was easy to hear air traffic after dialing through the aircraft audio system being piped through. I definitely did not know about the 1961 prohibition, so thank you also for that.

Out of the many times I have flown domestic and international, I think I used a receiver three maybe four times for some quick testing. Anyways, I have found that getting along with the crew can result in some really nice perks. I also first experienced binge watching of shows after loading up a Sony PSP for long flights over the Pacific back in the day.

I would not care to debate technicalities with a member of the crew. My main interest is in getting to my destination - not being removed from the plane. While I do travel on longer international flights (pre-COVID), I usually take flights in the 3 to 6 hour range. I can do without a radio for that long. Also, keep in mind that not following the directions of a crew member is a federal offense.
 
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