Amps VS volts... having a stupid moment

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QDP2012

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Just another question here.. If both chargers share the same power cord (AC), would that synchronize the transformers?
Nope. And the transformers are never synchronized, even if they were certified as matching. They are separated when properly connected to an isolator, hence the name.

Keep studying. There is a lot of theory to learn, but keep at it.

Maybe you can find some good circuits-book or websites that are made for teaching circuits.

Regardless, a commercially-produced solution sounds best for your situation--either an isolator, or a single-charger.
 
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Toastedwaves

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I was afraid that you would say that.. ;)

would love to find a universal charger that exceed my needs in amps.

Nays 3
Yays 0

But yes I will continue to think about that, because it is a problem for my computer and my usage of it.

=)
 

QDP2012

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I was afraid that you would say that.. ;)

would love to find a universal charger that exceed my needs in amps.

Nays 3
Yays 0

But yes I will continue to think about that, because it is a problem for my computer and my usage of it.

=)

Since your computer is designed by the manufacturer to use a charger with a certain rating and a certain set of tolerances, it might be good to do as others here have mentioned, and consider a different approach to how your power is delivered to your system.
  • If you have too many items drawing too much current through the computer, then externally powered devices might be the better choice -- i.e. use USB hubs that have their own power cords, instead of ones that draw through the computer.

  • Also, some manufacturers have alternate power-supply adapters that they sell for the same computer. In years past, Dell notebooks would come packed with a 65-watt power supply, but a 90-watt supply was an option. The 90 W or 65 W would power the notebook directly, but the 90 W was required for powering the computer via an external docking-bar, etc.

    Maybe your computer's manufacturer has something similar.
Hope this helps,
 
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Toastedwaves

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oh you bet that I'm gonna use external power on my hubs from now on QDP2012. Not gonna make that mistake again. That was dumb.

For the manufacturer replacement part/upgrade, back to square 1 for that. Not able (for many reasons) to do that. But will have to find a solution for buying online, because things are limited here. Not just for computers... They don't even use marrettes (plastic twist-on wire connectors) here ffs. They do have coconuts though xD
 

CapStar362

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ive been thinking about this topic, honestly, there is a big flaw here. the laptop is only going to draw what its designed for upto its theoretical maximum by design in the input circuits. just by adding more amperage does not mean its going to accept it. those adapters are pretty much designed inline with the maximum amount that the laptop that draw on both battery and the highest performance state it can achieve.

dont take this the wrong way Toasted, but its becoming a complex problem to which a rather simple solution already exists.

search the net for at least a 90-130 watt adapter. yes they do have 130 watt bricks out there. they will power anything laptop on the market.
 

Toastedwaves

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well yes, but again I cannot buy online, and therefore have to do with what I find here, thus this topic. Trust me, I would love to just buy one. I have money, but no credit card. Don't like them don't use them. See posts on first page.

You are pretty much confirming what I'm thinking about the amperage. Amperage does not 'push' in the computer, but is 'sucked' in by the computer. Therefore, doesn't mater how many amps I offer THE BEAST, as it will only take what it needs. Like me at a buffet...

Correct me if I'm wrong about this.
 

Toastedwaves

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actually I'm gonna correct myself on one point.

It does mater how much amp I feed it, as less is a bad thing. It makes the charger works harder and expires quicker.
 

CapStar362

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no it doesnt work that way. it only draws what it needs at that instant moment, upto its designed max.

while you might be "feeding" it more than it needs, it will only eat what it needs. the rest is just wasted


man if you had a way id get one for you....im looking at lots of quality 90-130 watt adapters.... but you dont like cards....which renders the point moot
 

Toastedwaves

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it does work that way as in: If I get a lesser charger 19v / 4.75a, that thing will die sooner than if it was the correct charger at 19v / 6.32a. Greater amperage on the other hand does not create problems. Actually, I'm pretty sure that a bigger capacity charger than what I need, in amperage, would not be a waste, but would last alot longer, and probly outlive the computer.
 

wtp

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i say go for it

how do you get d.c. to sync?
the transformers work on a.c. but put out d.c. ok there might be some ripple
the spike is usually seen on a voltmeter when nothing is connected (unregulated supply)
but i agree that if you have that many devices pulling power through usb it is time to split it off.
so my two cents is try it.
 
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I have connected two 12 volt power supplies in series before to make 24 volts, usually in emergency situations, and nothing bad happened. I would do it!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk 2
 

Toastedwaves

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ok so, wtp, has given me a new perspective with his comment above. Here is where i'm at in my reflection..

1. QDP2012, has explained that I will need a 'buffer' between both chargers. Well, there is a buffer between the two in the form of capacitors, Actually, there are two buffers, as each chargers give out the final DC power trough those.

2. I'm not clear on how both chargers will 'balance' themselves out, as they both do the same thing at the same time.


..
 
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Toastedwaves

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I have connected two 12 volt power supplies in series before to make 24 volts, usually in emergency situations, and nothing bad happened. I would do it!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk 2
OH!

Yays: 2
Nays: 2
Not sure but getting there after 3 pages: 1


xD
 
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And besides, the power adapter is just a switching power supply. Circuitry inside your pc does the charging and distribution of the power applied. There is circuitry built in to regulate and filter the power coming in.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk 2
 

Toastedwaves

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Very true, discombobulated. But here is what QDP2012 killed himself trying to explain to me above, and what I finally understand many hours later...

How will one charger knows that what 'he sees' is the computer needs vs the other charger? One will probly give juice to the computer but the other one will think that the battery is full, detecting the electricity from the other charger thinking "ah well no need for more here". Might have only one charger working at any moment.

But now that I'm thinking about what I just said... the computer will 'suck in' the amps of both, as one is not quite enough (but not all the time).

AAARRRRGGHHHH

getting there getting there.
 

WA0CBW

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Try looking at it this way. The power supply has a regulator that tries to keep the output voltage constant. As a device draws current the voltage drops but the regulator increases the output voltage to maintain a constant output. Now every power supply has a different voltage output. It is practically impossible to adjust them so that they are exactly equal. Each power supply tries to maintain a fixed output voltage. So when you connect two power supplies in parallel one tries to raise the voltage of the other (remember it is impossible to adjust them to the same voltage, one will always be larger than the other) So when one power supply tries to "raise" the voltage of the other supply the lower voltage power supply voltage regulator tries to maintain its lower voltage by reducing its voltage. Now when that happens we have a potential voltage difference and current flows from the higher voltage supply into the lower voltage supply. Now the lower voltage power supply regulator continues to lower the voltage thus causing a larger potential difference which causes more current to flow into the lower voltage supply. When a load is connected to these parallel power supplies, not only does one supply have to provide current to the load but also to the other power supply (remember the potential difference). This continues until one of them gives up and releases the "magic" smoke that makes all electronic things work.
BB
 

QDP2012

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ok so, wtp, has given me a new perspective with his comment above. Here is where i'm at in my reflection..

1. QDP2012, has explained that I will need a 'buffer' between both chargers. Well, there is a buffer between the two in the form of capacitors, Actually, there are two buffers, as each chargers give out the final DC power trough those.

2. I'm not clear on how both chargers will 'balance' themselves out, as they both do the same thing at the same time.


..
1. No. Please re-read the earlier posts. With the two-charger design, you need an isolator between the chargers. A battery could go between the charging-system and the device...maybe...if the device's design allows that option.

2. Forget the idea of chargers that "balance" themselves or that "work together". When properly isolated, they don't know each other exist. If they know each other exist, they "fight", and one (or both) of them will lose the fight.

2b. When you study the theory and learn about what is happening inside the chargers, you will learn that they will never exactly "both do the same thing at the same time", even though each charger's "purpose" is the same. Please re-read the earlier posts about "out-of-phase" and about voltage-differences.


Until you have an opportunity to properly learn circuit-theory, this same knowledge-gap will seem to go against your intuition. Unfortunately, this is one of those times in life when the "simple-theory" intuition is incorrect. Take the time to learn the rest of the theory. Until then, hopefully, you will not risk your equipment with the non-isolated two-charger experiment.

Either get an isolator, or get a better single-charger.

Hope this helps,
 
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I would think that the power supply with the highest potential would dominate and the other would match it. You could put some diodes in each output for current protection.

Sent from my MB860 using Tapatalk 2
 
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Toastedwaves

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Thanks again WA0CBW and QDP2012 ") Greatly appreciate the information, even if I do not grasp all of it.

I thought the Yays might have a chance, but the latest, pretty much blew that option out of the water..

Interesting non the less.
 
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