Another plus for the Austin Spectra

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AronDouglas

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I know there is a section for this ( I'll go post there to), but just to let everyone know the Austin Spectra can receive the ISS. I set up my scope and camera this morning at 0545 and awaited the flyover of the ISS starting at 0603 (10 degrees above the horizon and rising). I was clearly able to see the solar panels with my Celestron 120mm with 17mm eyepiece (you astronomy guys will know what all that means). I had only about 4 minutes of observation time (was suppose to be 10+ minutes, but my location for celestial viewing is much to be desired), so I was running (literately) between the scope, camera and the truck scanner (BCT15X). I heard a few APRS packets on 145.825mhz but nothing on any of the other frequencies (I only was listening to the scanner for maybe 45 seconds). So the Austin Spectra coupled with the BCT15X mounted on my work truck was able to pick up the ISS, too bad I can decode APRS with the BTC15X :

Oh and here are the only goods pics that I could get. I used the Canon PowerShot ELPH110 HS set to 15 second shutter (first image) and 5 second shutter (second image). The sun rose at 0633 and these images where taken at around 0605, thats why the sky is so bright. The sky was actually a lot darker.

Look just above the trees, dead center of the photo and you will see a white line, thats the ISS shining at a -3.2ish magnitude (The moon is a -12ish magnitude, so this is actually pretty bright for a satellite. It could EASILY been seen through the slight haze of the morning and the brightening sky)


And here is the second image shot at a 5 second shutter (my fault its shaky).
 

n4yek

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I always enjoy trying to view visible pass-overs of the ISS, especially when you point it out to someone who didn't know you could actually see it from the ground. It always make them smile.
 

WA4HHG

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Very cool ! A 120mm refractor is great for planetary/moon viewing. I have an 80mm which is supurb for the moon. If you really want to concentrate on hearing the ISS, this would be the antenna of choice:

M2
 
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