Antenna - Coax - Amplifier - Splitter SetUp...

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DocDaddy

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Instead of trying to explain what I want to do... I thought I would use an illustration.

Scantenna split to two BCT15's

The questions I have:

Is this the right amp & splitter.

What coax would be best.

Antenna will be mounted in the attic, so no weathering of cables or connections.

Will listen mostly to 42 - 174 Some 400

Any suggestions..??

Thanks for your help...
 

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scrotumola

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I really like this attic setup. I would make sure that the interior of your attic is not lined with insulation that includes a foil-type barrier or that the roof is a metal one, as it will have a negative affect on your reception. Other factors to consider are sources of interference in the attic. Near by plasma TVs, the new compact flourescent bulbs and even an attic mounted cental heat/air unit will cause significant in-attic interference. Your amplifier will also boost the level of interference as well. Going to an external antenna-if this is an option-will decrease the proximity to and level of interference.

If you were to go external, I would definetly include a polyphaser lightning/surge supressor tied to a properly installed grounding network at the feedline's entry point into the house.

I think you have done well in planning this setup, let us know how it works out for you.
 

af5rn

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Nice illustration!

Those products would be sufficient, assuming they work okay. I have had bad luck with those cheap little splitter-type connectors and amps. Same with the little in-line filters. Maybe you'll have better luck.

I would very definitely move the preamp higher up the drawing though. If possible, connect it inline to the antenna with just a very short jumper. You want it as close to the antenna as possible, otherwise you will amplify more static than signal. Have you yet determined that you even need a preamp? Are you sure you can't hear everything you want to hear without it? You might be able to save your money.

For the length you are running, and the bands you are monitoring, it really doesn't matter what coax you use. You can spend a lot of money on the very best coax available, but it simply won't make an audible difference to you. Just the normal RG-6 that comes with the Scantenna is just fine for you. Only if you are listening to much higher frequencies, at long distances, and with longer coax runs than 100 feet does it really matter.
 

andrewccm

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I have a similar setup and can suggest that the amp is probably not necessary. I was actually overloading my BCT15 with some 400mhz traffic out of Dallas PD which is 15-20 miles away using a 13db preamp. After trying several things, I just ended up using the standard RG6 cable and the ST2 in the attic. I used to just use a simple splitter to the radios and it worked just fine. However, I now only go to a single BCT15. I added a Yagi for 800 that goes to my digital 386T.

So to sum up.... with that particular setup, try it simple to begin with and see how it works. I went the opposite direction and it cost me a few bucks that I didn't need to spend.

Good luck!
 

DocDaddy

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Thanks for the replies...

Here's what I ended up doing...

There was not enough room in my attic to install the Scantenna in a vertical position. So my second choice was a Discone Antenna.

I used a splitter to go to two BCT15's and I'm receiving more than I could have imagined... all without the use of an amplifier.

Thanks for all the replies & pm's.

All is good now !!
 
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