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Antenna Specialists Super Scanner CB Antenna

MDScanFan

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Jan 23, 2010
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Last year I spent some time investigating off the shelf options for 2, 3, or 4 element hf phased verticals. During this time I came across the super scanner cb antenna. I had never seen anything like it applied to cb use. It uses a triangular arrangement of elevated half wave verticals and can form a directive sector beam or an omni (I believe).

There is a used one on eBay right now (eBay link) - I have no connection to it. This is the first one I have seen for sale that looks complete. I see just the control boxes pop up now and then. As of this post the highest bid is $335 and I am curious to see where it ends up.

Has anyone used one of these? If so, what did you think of it? Also, what was the original price?

872B5BA5-B1C8-4342-A703-9E76D0AE632A.jpeg
 
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Has anyone used one of these? If so, what did you think of it? Also, what was the original price?
My brother had one and we used it to talk to each other locally in the 70's. It was good for about 15 miles or so.

I used a 3 element beam on a 20 ft tower on the roof.

It was directional but not much. It wasn't anything spectacular and I don't remember what he paid for it. I'm guessing around $50.

I seem to remember it was called something like "Stargazer" or something like that.

Good luck!
 

prcguy

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Jun 30, 2006
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So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
I've played with several of them and they work similar to a 2 element beam but without the need for a rotor. The front to back ratio might be a little better than a simple 2 element beam but I don't see anything to justify the current prices. People are gouging thinking its a nostalgic antenna and people will pay bit $$ for a little slice of the 1970s. Unless you get one for a really good price save your money for something better.
 

zzdiesel

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I believe the early versions were a lot more dependable. The switching relays were much more resilient than the newer ones. They took a lot more RF power anyway & they lasted longer all the way around. They're heavy & bulky. I'd want to put one on at least a small tower!
 

dispatch235

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Jan 27, 2005
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Dixon, Missouri
They ran around $100 to $125 back in the late 70's-early 80's at our local shop in MO. Around the same price as a Moonraker IV. Quite a few people in this area ran one at one time or another, and many that had big beams at one time eventually downsized to the Super Scanner. I have owned/sold probably a dozen over the years, bought most of them slightly used in good shape for $25, a couple were free just to take them down. If I had only known how popular they would be today lol. If they are assembled correctly they will actually do quite well. I had one the same height as my Moonraker IV and outside of very weak signals, or "shutting the back door" on someone they were pretty comparable for the difference in size. The earlier versions that had the coax pigtail matching harness had heavier relay switches. The really early models had an ugly control box. As far as how much wind resistance, many compared it to a sheet of plywood lol. A couple of them I used myself I switched out the stock rg58 coax harness to rg8x, but you have to figure out the velocity factor difference to measure the length of the rg8x for it to perform as it should.
 

n9mxq

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Dec 15, 2005
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Belvidere IL
Had one years ago and absolutely loved it.. One of the few CB antennas I wish I still had. At the time I didn't have the room to swing a big beam and it did a great job. Yea, it's a compromise antenna, but I enjoyed it.
 

JayMojave

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Dec 13, 2007
Messages
687
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Mojave Ca
Hello All: These antennas work well and do have some degree of being directional. If a used one is purched suggest the relays are tested on the ground and replaced if needed. Also fixed a Scanner antenna once, when it was installed they had metal guy wires connected to the base of the antenna were attaches to the mast, the metal guy wires being close the bottom elements throw off the SWR. If the Scanner antenna is installed as the picture shows, or Nylon guy lines are used you should be ok.

Jay in the Great Mojave Desert...… "Next Gas 150 Miles"
 

MDScanFan

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Jan 23, 2010
Messages
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Location
USA
A 3 element beam would definitely provide more gain. The simplicity of its installation and lack of moving parts (aside from the relays) makes a neat cb antenna design to eek out more gain and f/b that a standard vertical.

In the end it went for $335. That’s a lot for a used antenna that is at least a couple decades old.
 
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