Apple Fire incident in Riverside county

mike619

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Does anyone know what frequencies are being used on the incident?
 

Paysonscanner

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I'm not sure if the Type I team is national or Cal Fire. I could look it up, but time is short. If it is a national incident management team the National Interagency Fire Center systems will be used. On the first page of the database, above the U.S. map is a tab labeled "Nationwide Frequencies." Scroll down to Federal. You will see "National Interagency Fire Center" listed. Click on it. I'll give you a shortcut, but I wanted you to know how to get there without it.

NIFC Frequencies

If the state is managing the fire go to the California page. Under the California State Agencies listing below the right lower corner of the state map, use the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) link. My scanners have separate "lists, groups, banks) for the NIFC system and another for the Cal Fire statewide commands, tacs, aviation and tacticals. I named them "Federal Large Fire" and "State Large Fire." I don't scan them unless a large fire is nearby or one is seen while traveling. That way we don't scramble around trying to find and program these sets of frequencies. The challenge is when a fire is using an unlisted frequency. Then you have to put the scanner into the search mode. Sometimes Cal Fire uses components of the NIFC system, don't assume freq use is always black and white. The NIFC system is available for all levels of government for all types of incidents.

When I see people figuring out what freqs are being used on a large fire, I wish I was there to help.
 

P25Radio

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I can hear air Ops and attack from my home in Oceanside.
 

brcoz

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This is what I have programmed.
NIFC ELT 121.500000 AM
NIFC Air 3 122.850000 AM
NIFC All Com 122.900000 AM
NIFC Air 1 122.925000 AM
NIFC Air 2 122.975000 AM
NIFC Air 4 123.025000 AM
NIFC Air 5 123.025000 AM
NIFC Air 7 123.050000 AM
NIFC Air 6 123.075000 AM
CDF B Victor 123.975000 AM
CDF AAB S3 133.425000 AM
USFS R5 LE T 162.962500 CT
NIFC IntraCrew 1 163.712500 FM
BDF4 ServRpt R 164.125000 CT 156.7
BDF3 AdmRpt T 164.137500 CT
CNF Frst Rpt T 164.800000 CT
BDF4 ServRpt T 164.825000 CT 156.7
NIFC IntraCrew 2 167.137500 FM
NIFC T1 R 168.050000 FM
BDF2 FrstRpt T 168.150000 CT
NIFC T2 168.200000 FM
NIFC T3 168.600000 FM
BDF5 R5 Prjct R 168.662500 FM
A/G 59 CA4 P R 169.112500 FM
 

Paysonscanner

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This is what I have programmed.
NIFC ELT 121.500000 AM
NIFC Air 3 122.850000 AM
NIFC All Com 122.900000 AM
NIFC Air 1 122.925000 AM
NIFC Air 2 122.975000 AM
NIFC Air 4 123.025000 AM
NIFC Air 5 123.025000 AM
NIFC Air 7 123.050000 AM
NIFC Air 6 123.075000 AM
CDF B Victor 123.975000 AM
CDF AAB S3 133.425000 AM
USFS R5 LE T 162.962500 CT
NIFC IntraCrew 1 163.712500 FM
BDF4 ServRpt R 164.125000 CT 156.7
BDF3 AdmRpt T 164.137500 CT
CNF Frst Rpt T 164.800000 CT
BDF4 ServRpt T 164.825000 CT 156.7
NIFC IntraCrew 2 167.137500 FM
NIFC T1 R 168.050000 FM
BDF2 FrstRpt T 168.150000 CT
NIFC T2 168.200000 FM
NIFC T3 168.600000 FM
BDF5 R5 Prjct R 168.662500 FM
A/G 59 CA4 P R 169.112500 FM
I'm confused as to what T and R mean. I thought it meant tactical and repeater, but on USFS R5 LE, BDF4 ServRpt, BDF3 AdmRpt, CNF Frst Rpt and BDF FrstRpt you show as T and on a known tactical, NIFC Tac 1 you show an R. If simplex comms (tactical) are carried out on forest, admin and service nets, the repeater output frequency is used. I'm curious why you show only repeater inputs and not outputs for all the repeater nets.

The 2020 R5 Freq Guide does not list a Service Net for the San Bernardino NF, however, in their radio group/channel plan for the forest, it might be included in some groups as channel 4. I don't have a current copy of their group plan. This is the same service net used on the Angeles and now I wonder if it is used on the Cleveland, as used to be the case with an older Service Net freq pair.

I think the IntraCrew frequencies are narrowband FM or NFM. Nationally each interagency hotshot crew has been assigned one of the 4 "IntraCrew Frequencies," which are actually federal government itinerant frequencies assigned at the time of the NTIA narrowband mandate in 2005. Each crew has been assigned a CTCSS for their assigned frequency. Remember that these are for logistical communications within a crew, not for tactical comms within a crew or to communicate with other crews, that occurs on incident assigned tacticals.

The ELT, (electronic location transmitter?) frequency is universal and international. It's official name is International Air Distress (IAD). It is not NIFC assigned.

The frequency you show as "R5 LE T" is the repeater input for 171.7875, the law enforcement net Region 5 of the USFS is currently building. The effort is going slowly. It will be encrypted eventually, per national, all federal agency, direction for law enforcement comms.

The ICS Form 205, the Incident Radio Communications Plan, posted by 952Media, is gold for all incidents. The ICS 220, the Air Operations Summary shows all the aviation freq use. Each handheld is cloned with the plan so that everyone can switch to a channel and be on the same frequency. There might be some communications on the local, day to day nets and tacs, as a result of this incident, but not directly related to its management. You might hear recreation people talking about campground closures on Forest and Admin required because of the fire and similar.
 

djpaulino

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Temecula, Riverside County CA
I'm not sure if the Type I team is national or Cal Fire. I could look it up, but time is short. If it is a national incident management team the National Interagency Fire Center systems will be used. On the first page of the database, above the U.S. map is a tab labeled "Nationwide Frequencies." Scroll down to Federal. You will see "National Interagency Fire Center" listed. Click on it. I'll give you a shortcut, but I wanted you to know how to get there without it.

NIFC Frequencies

If the state is managing the fire go to the California page. Under the California State Agencies listing below the right lower corner of the state map, use the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) link. My scanners have separate "lists, groups, banks) for the NIFC system and another for the Cal Fire statewide commands, tacs, aviation and tacticals. I named them "Federal Large Fire" and "State Large Fire." I don't scan them unless a large fire is nearby or one is seen while traveling. That way we don't scramble around trying to find and program these sets of frequencies. The challenge is when a fire is using an unlisted frequency. Then you have to put the scanner into the search mode. Sometimes Cal Fire uses components of the NIFC system, don't assume freq use is always black and white. The NIFC system is available for all levels of government for all types of incidents.

When I see people figuring out what freqs are being used on a large fire, I wish I was there to help.
Management of the incident has been transitioned to California Interagency Incident Management Team (IMT) 2.
 

Paysonscanner

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Management of the incident has been transitioned to California Interagency Incident Management Team (IMT) 2.
Found that later, at first I wondered if that was a CA State Type 1 or a federal Type 1 Team. I suspected it was a state team and I found out later that is was a state team. Thanks for confirming this.
 

marlin39a

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I know the fire is killing me in Yavapai County, Arizona. I’m surrounded by mountains, but can hardly see them. Sunrise and sunsets are cloudy, and red. California has to address this problem.
 

brcoz

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The T and R were notes for me. T=Tx and R=Rx See below.

I was trying to help the what I programmed in my scanner. I added what I saw I could pick up from my location.
Sorry to cause confusion. I am not a pro in the field.


89375
 

tkenny53

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Whats neat, I have the IC about a mile from my house, talk about a small city, also CalFire units scattered at different hotels in the area
 

Paysonscanner

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I know the fire is killing me in Yavapai County, Arizona. I’m surrounded by mountains, but can hardly see them. Sunrise and sunsets are cloudy, and red. California has to address this problem.
I can't tell if you said that in jest or not. Yes, California has to do something. When large fires in Arizona (think the Wallow Fire) affect the air quality in New Mexico, Colorado, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas, those states should force Arizona to put an immediate halt to it. I'm not sure what we would expect Arizona to do, the air in one state doesn't seem to want to stay within political borders. DARN!

Whats neat, I have the IC about a mile from my house, talk about a small city, also CalFire units scattered at different hotels in the area
To be entirely accurate in the Incident Command System (ICS), the IC is the incident commander, a person. His location can vary, he might be up in a helicopter, he may be in the offices of other agencies and he might be busy with a TV interview. The Incident Command Post, is where is usually is. This ICP is usually located at the incident base, commonly referred to as "fire camp." In limited cases the ICP is not located at base camp. Base camp is where people are fed, supplied, treated for injuries, sleep, shower, park their vehicles, get their radios cloned to the Incident Comm Plan, walk across the street to get some neat T Shirts made specially for the incident (private vendors not allowed in the base camp) and some other things too numerous to list.

When I lived in the west foothills of the Sierra Nevada I saw some of these cities get built in 12 hours, sometimes in the middle of the night. As an RN in a small county I worked in the base camp medical unit 2 times. They asked me to stay in camp, so I got the full treatment, a cooked breakfast and dinner and firefighters favorite item of their experience, a fire sack lunch. {SARCASM} In camp they had a condiment bar (lettuce, tomatoes, etc.) at the dining area, but out on the ground you eat everything dry. My late Hubby was assigned many times on structure protection engine strike teams when our local volunteer fire department sent an engine to form a team. Most of the time, fortunately, given my worries, the team was there "just in case." Sometimes the team saw a lot of action, like the Rim Fire in 2013. I got most of my fire/ICS knowledge from him, the rest came from my Daddy, a 36 year employee of the USFS.
 
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