Aprs.fi

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Is 144.39 Mhz the only frequency that is used on the web suite for the reporting stations? I want to get a commercial radio and have it only for that purpose only should I get a single channel, two channel, or what? And that would free up half of my dual watch radio. And how should I program it I know it is simplex with out squeltch tones.
 

N5TWB

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Aprs.fi shows stations/IDs that are being received by digipeaters and I-gates that are connected to the Internet for reporting purposes. The frequency you cite (144.39) is the one most used by those stations but it is not necessarily absolutely the only one or the only one allowed. Reading a little into your question, it seems you want to directly receive APRS stations and decode the data directly onto your computer rather than using the Internet? If so, your plan could work with a single channel radio as long as you can take the data to a TNC that will decode it so your computer can display it.
 

n9mxq

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You could also use a soundcard modem (Sound Card Packet Interface by KD5ZUG). Most current APRS clients support this. Plug your radio speaker out to a line in of a USB sound card, and the USB Speaker out to the microphone (via a simple circuit to key the rig if needed). No TNC needed. I run APRSIS32 here as a home station/digi and it gates everything I hear to the APRSIS internet side. (So everyone can see it on APRS.FI and FINDU.COM)

144.390 is pretty much accepted nationwide now for APRS use.
 

code3cowboy

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Mostly. 144.99 is generally the backup channel, and 10.151 (iirc). I have a ton of two channel Motorola Radius mobiles that are great for APRS. PM me if you need one.
 

LtDoc

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That frequency, 144.390 Mhz, is the common frequency for the USA, it's different for Europe.
There are two ways for APRS to be received by the average user, by RF and over the internet. That RF method is 'direct', you have to be able to hear'em, be close enough to hear them. The internet method relies on someone putting the received information on the internet (called "Igates" or 'Igating').
APRS isn't just ham related, it's very common for 'fleet' tracking using 'commercial' frequencies. Sears is one that I know of that does that, track their repair trucks etc. So do a lot of freight companies (18 wheelers).
If you have an amateur license, use 144.390 and a radio to do your tracking. Or, spend the money and have a commercial 'tracking' company install equipment and do it for you. About as simple as that (didn't say cheap!).
If you have your own dedicated radio frequency, I don't see why you can't set up your own system, it isn't that difficult (although it can get complicated). It's not so convenient for use on a 'voice' channel, APRS is noisy, can certainly interfere with voice communications.
I 'do' APRS, I like it. If I can do it, anybody can do it! Just remember the legal ramifications...
- 'Doc


(And the internet APRS is NOT real time. The delay can be just a few seconds or days, depending on the activity/congestion of internet traffic.)
 

geoff5093

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(And the internet APRS is NOT real time. The delay can be just a few seconds or days, depending on the activity/congestion of internet traffic.)
I would consider it real time, the delay is milliseconds to seconds. If it takes longer then that then there is a fluke somewhere, such as a server is offline or an IGate is not operating properly causing delay in packet transmissions to the internet.
 

KE4NYV

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What is wrong with setting your commercial radio up on 144.390 and then setting up your own iGate with it? Are you having coverage problems and want to have a closer node, that you know you can get into? I'm a bit fuzzy on your goal. I understand that you have a dual band that you do not want to tie up for APRS, hence the second radio, but I don't understand what it has to do with getting into the APRS IS network.
 
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