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APX 6000 Antennae question

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skierp20

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Hi, everyone. I was recently issued a new radio at work.. the APX 6000. I've been using it for the last couple of days and I'm really not all that impressed. I kinda want my XTS 5000 back but that's not happening.

We are currently operating on an 800 MHZ trunked system. We are all issued long antennae which I find extremely cumbersome and annoying. It seems to get snagged on just about everything: my shirt, my bag etc etc. so I'm exploring the idea of going to a "shorty" antenna.

Has anyone done this with an APX 6000? How much signal loss do you get when transmitting? How about receiving? If it matters (and it probably does) I work in Delaware. Describing this state as "FLAT" is a gross understatement.

Any tips anyone have would be greatly appreciated...

Thanks!!
 

SCPD

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I use this on my APX 6000. No issues for me, Tx or Rx on analog and digital systems. Don't know what kind of work you do but if in public safety, best to check with your radio folks. Otherwise, just try it and see.

No one is who is trying to get a massive APX antenna out of their ribcage is measuring "signal loss" - just saying...
 

skierp20

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Thanks for the advice! I'm going to give it a shot and see what happens. I had a shorty on my XTS and had no issues.

I DO, in fact, work in public safety. So I'll see what they say. Thankfully, I also found a case that will hopefully work better. We have to use our zones etc. often so dismantling the stock case to get to the keypad is kind of a pain.

Again, I appreciate it! We'll see how I do
 

mmckenna

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Check with your radio guys before changing antennas. Unless you personally own that radio, its the property of your department. Changing antennas -could- be frowned upon.
I run an 800MHz system, I don't really mind if users swap out to stubby antennas. I've heard enough complaints about getting poked in the ribs, arm pit, etc. to last me a lifetime, so I hear what you are saying.

If you do swap out the antenna, just remember that it was your choice. If you change it out, then start having issues with coverage, don't blame the system. Sounds like you are not the type of guy to do that. I've had this issue, though. I issue the radios with the stock whip antenna. If users choose to swap out the antenna, that's fine with me. Issue I have is when they come back and start blaming my radio system for coverage issues. When I ask to see their radio and I see they've put a stubby on it, I had it back to them.

Honestly, though, I've tried both whip and stubbys on my radio and using the RSSI dB display on the radio, I don't see a big difference in performance on the RX side. There is some, but it isn't drastic on my system. Your milage may vary.
 

skierp20

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The system itself is fantastic. I have ZERO complaints there. We had a mix of stubby's and full sized whips on the 5000's we had/have.

I was also looking around for an extender mic with a stubby on it, and I have failed to find any for the APX 6000 from my usual group of vendors that I peruse.

Regardless though, if I do switch, the full-sized will be kept close since it is, like you say, department property.

Thanks for the advice!
 

wsykes41770

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One other thing to keep in mind with the APX6000 is that it has a built-in GPS. The "long" antenna has the antenna for the GPS built into it and the stubby doesn't. Depending on how your system is configured, your higher ups may frown on the possible loss of tracking ability by switching to a stubby, if that is a feature that they use.
 

skierp20

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One other thing to keep in mind with the APX6000 is that it has a built-in GPS. The "long" antenna has the antenna for the GPS built into it and the stubby doesn't. Depending on how your system is configured, your higher ups may frown on the possible loss of tracking ability by switching to a stubby, if that is a feature that they use.
Thanks. I was able to find this which should cover me.

Motorola APX7000 APX6000 APX4000 Radio 7 800 MHz Plus GPS Stubby Antenna | eBay
 

skierp20

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KG4INW

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A coiled cord would wreak havoc on the RF signal since it's routed through the RSM cable. Laws of physics I'm afraid!
 

SCPD

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One other thing to keep in mind with the APX6000 is that it has a built-in GPS. The "long" antenna has the antenna for the GPS built into it and the stubby doesn't. Depending on how your system is configured, your higher ups may frown on the possible loss of tracking ability by switching to a stubby, if that is a feature that they use.
Sorry, but there are stubby 7/800 antenna with GPS in them. MOL part number NAR6595.
 

photoguy2

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KG4INW

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Yes, I remember seeing those now too. It's not the majority of the length but I'd still imagine it would have an affect on the signal. Early Motorola PSMs did have coiled cords but they quickly realized they didn't work as well. I've attached a picture of the NMN6194A (For Jedi radios).
 

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wsykes41770

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Thank you! I still can't figure out why they don't make this mic w the coiled cord instead of the straight one. It makes things tough on you when you're 6'5!
I asked that question myself one time and the answer I was giving is that because it has an antenna on the mic, the coil would change the way the antenna works. If you think about it, this makes sense. The cord would act as a loading coil and change the impedance of the antenna. This could potentially damage the radio by having a high SWR ratio.
 
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