• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

Authorities warn of wireless cyber pirates

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STiMULi

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The Sheriff's Department plans to equip several of its community service and patrol cars with devices that detect unprotected computer networks.
Yeah right :) How are they going to do that. I can see it now... Deputy Fife with his yagi pointing it at some house trying to figure out why when he keys the mic the signal goes away

Your just trying to stir it up again, huh? :lol:
 

compubandit

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I can drive around with my UT Starcom cellular phone that is a mobile PC also and pick up others wireless networks. I would say that most of the systems are protected but not all. My phone will scan for any wireless system that transmitts an ID. In my small town (1175 population), there are several people with open systems that my cellphone/mobile pc can connect to their internet. The law office, school system, courthouse and many others keep theirs protected. So maybe they aren't too far off...
 

MacombMonitor

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STiMULi said:
Yeah right :) How are they going to do that. I can see it now... Deputy Fife with his yagi pointing it at some house trying to figure out why when he keys the mic the signal goes away

Your just trying to stir it up again, huh? :lol:
Hey, I don't write this stuff...I just post it. :p

It just seems to be way out of the ordinary for the sheriff to be involved in such activity.
 

richster

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A little over a year ago now a freind of mine was a victim of a person or persons logging into his wireless network.

Owners of wireless networks have to become educated, and secure their wireless networks, becuase wardriving is an epidemic and laws (if there are any) are not going to protect you.

My friend had a network specialist come in to secure his wireless network, and it was fine for a couple of months until someone came along who new how to break the latest in WEP encryption.

My friend and I have become educated fast on this topic and I can tell you it's a real battle keeping secure, because once a new more secure encryption scheme comes out, it is broken pretty fast.

Right now I'm running my wireless network with WPA-personal encryption. WPA changes the encryption key with every packet, so right now it's secure but I'm not holding my breath. These mobile creeps trying to hack into personal wireless networks (including encrypted ones), are pretty adaptive.

I had to buy new hardware that runs WPA, and it's was a mojor pain to configure, but I think it was worth the money. I haven't had an unauthorized access in 3 months (and still crossing fingers).

Regards,
Richster.
 
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MacombMonitor

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I understand all the risk, and need for securing your WiFi network, but where does the sheriff come in on all of this? I could see if a crime had been committed, and this was part of the investigation, but that's not the case.

What next? Is the fire department going to come into my home to make sure all my electrical outlets have three prongs, and are properly grounded? It sounds like these guys have way too much time on their hands, or they're in fear of layoffs, and trying to reinvent their jobs.
 

richster

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MacombMonitor said:
I understand all the risk, and need for securing your WiFi network, but where does the sheriff come in on all of this? I could see if a crime had been committed, and this was part of the investigation, but that's not the case.

What next? Is the fire department going to come into my home to make sure all my electrical outlets have three prongs, and are properly grounded? It sounds like these guys have way too much time on their hands, or they're in fear of layoffs, and trying to reinvent their jobs.
I completely understand where you're coming from, but I think you misunderstand the story. I'm pretty sure the reason why the sheriff's department is warning people about this is not because they have nothing to do or they want to intrude in peoples affairs, but because they have had a bunch of instances where not so nice poeple out there are doing malicious things on other peoples private networks.

Personally back in December I watched a person who cracked my WEP encrypted network trying to access my personal documents (I have them password encrypted). I booted him off, but he could have easily have downloaded those documents and used some sort of tool to find the password afterwards. This was the reason why I bought my WPA system.

Regards,
Richster.
 

MacombMonitor

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richster said:
I completely understand where you're coming from, but I think you misunderstand the story. I'm pretty sure the reason why the sheriff's department is warning people about this is not because they have nothing to do or they want to intrude in peoples affairs, but because they have had a bunch of instances where not so nice poeple out there are doing malicious things on other peoples private networks.

Personally back in December I watched a person who cracked my WEP encrypted network trying to access my personal documents (I have them password encrypted). I booted him off, but he could have easily have downloaded those documents and used some sort of tool to find the password afterwords. This was the reason why I bought my WPA system.

Regards,
Richster.
Have you considered using a firewall, and not sharing your document folders on your network? Even if they can hack your WiFi, they shouldn't be able to access your computer.
 

richster

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MacombMonitor said:
Have you considered using a firewall, and not sharing your document folders on your network? Even if they can hack your WiFi, they shouldn't be able to access your computer.
A firewall is either software or a peice of hardware that keeps bad guys from the internet out, but doesn't keep bad guys from accessing your wireless router. That's why these wireless router makers are always improving the encryption schemes on them. I was thinking of some sort of way to make a hardware firewall (involving yet another computer), but the idea was getting very expensive and complicated, and I wasn't even sure it could be done. This WPA router was much cheaper and a little easier.

As far as sharing folders goes. I was, for a while anyways last year, trying not to share folders that have information of a personal nature. But this just pissed me off. A good instance of this, is when I was on my work computer one day and I needed to access "my personal phone book" to get a freinds phone number, I couldn't get it because it wasn't shared. So I had to go to my gaming and internet system to look it up. This made me steam and ask; "why have a LAN setup anyways, this is crap!".

Whew! My network woes are straying off topic here. I would rather have law enforcement informing me of my insecure network VIA public service announcements or something to that effect. But I don't like the fact of law enforcement having devices put in their cars to go searching for insecure networks, I would think they have more pertaining matters to attend to.

Regards,
Richster.
 

STiMULi

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The average hacker is a dufus. The good ones and there are few, can hack just about anything.

You must take the basic steps to secure yourself.

How many of you do not use password protection to get into your PC?
Complex enough passwords?
WPA2?
MAC address resrictions?
SSID broadcast inhibit?
Elimnate unnecessary shares?
Basic Hardware/software firewalls?
Turn off your AP (wireless router) when not in use? [just kidding]
 

richster

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STiMULi said:
The average hacker is a dufus. The good ones and there are few, can hack just about anything.

You must take the basic steps to secure yourself.

How many of you do not use password protection to get into your PC?
Complex enough passwords?
WPA2?
MAC address resrictions?
SSID broadcast inhibit?
Elimnate unnecessary shares?
Basic Hardware/software firewalls?
Turn off your AP (wireless router) when not in use? [just kidding]
That is excellent advice.

WPA2? Don't tell me someone invented a lamer-tool to crack WPA!! Sigh....If I haven't spent enough money already. It better be a software flash.

Regards,
Richster.
 

Napalm

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I run WEP, MAC filtering, no SSID. In all honesty though, if there are any hardcore hackers/crackers in my neighbourhood, all that filtering and encryption will make him WANT to get in.
 

johnvassel

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The secret is not having anything worth hacking into. My wifi is open, and not once yet has a stray MAC been found wandering in. Oddly enough, my pc was complaining of a weak signal one day, and I realized that over the last few months a neighbor also had an open wifi router and my pc had logged into it.
Of course, I live in a neighborhood where we all know eachother and a strange car is spotted upon entrance to the village. But, my main reason for no fear is there's no financial stuff kept on my pc's. The best a hacker is going to do is maybe see what sites I surf.
 

k9swx

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richster said:
Personally back in December I watched a person who cracked my WEP encrypted network trying to access my personal documents (I have them password encrypted). I booted him off, but he could have easily have downloaded those documents and used some sort of tool to find the password afterwards. This was the reason why I bought my WPA system.
How did you watch this person get into your system? What sort of software are you running to do that? Do you have one of those 3rd party firmwares for your router that lets you install sniffers and other goodies? Just wondering, thanks!
 

DaveNF2G

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MacombMonitor said:
I understand all the risk, and need for securing your WiFi network, but where does the sheriff come in on all of this? I could see if a crime had been committed, and this was part of the investigation, but that's not the case.
Ever hear of "crime prevention"? How about "community policing"? Sounds to me like the sheriff is trying to provide a service to the public. Having hardware to search for unsecured networks is not much different from walking around rattling doorknobs to make sure buildings are locked up.

What next? Is the fire department going to come into my home to make sure all my electrical outlets have three prongs, and are properly grounded? It sounds like these guys have way too much time on their hands, or they're in fear of layoffs, and trying to reinvent their jobs.
If your fire department doesn't do safety inspections, then they are not meeting standards for fire prevention. It has always been a legitimate part of modern public safety to try to prevent emergencies from occurring. Your suspicion of legitimate help being offered by government agencies to protect yourself from danger is akin to paranoia.

:roll:
 

STiMULi

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I can see it now... Deputy Fife with his yagi pointing it at some house trying to figure out why when he keys the mic the signal goes away
"Andy I think that Opie is on Aunt Bees Laptop again looking up something about a dadburned DiVinci Code"
 

K0ATC

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And next week, how locking your home and car can prevent theft.......what a joke! This is what every dumba$$ in america wants, someone else to do all the leg work. I didnt know.....I didnt know..... The day i need the police to tell me my wireless network is not secure is the day I want to be put in the ground!

RS
 

richster

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k9swx said:
How did you watch this person get into your system? What sort of software are you running to do that? Do you have one of those 3rd party firmwares for your router that lets you install sniffers and other goodies? Just wondering, thanks!
Hi Stan,

3rd party firmwares? sniffers and other goodies? No nothing fancy like that. "Watched" is a poor choice of word here. I accidently stumbled upon him. I was trying to move some files around when XP told me it couldn't because an e-mail attachment in my personal folder was in use. After checking everything else, I checked the current active users on my LAN and there was reason for the file being open. So I turfed the reject.

Regards,
Richster.
 

jeffrey420

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MacombMonitor said:
I understand all the risk, and need for securing your WiFi network, but where does the sheriff come in on all of this? I could see if a crime had been committed, and this was part of the investigation, but that's not the case.

What next? Is the fire department going to come into my home to make sure all my electrical outlets have three prongs, and are properly grounded? It sounds like these guys have way too much time on their hands, or they're in fear of layoffs, and trying to reinvent their jobs.
It is like anything else in our society. We always want to treat the symptom and not the problem. Just like when you have a four-way intersection with a two-way stop sign. If enough people get hurt because they don't pay attention or run the stop sign, we put up two more signs.

More direct to the question. They should have some laws concerning this. If you hack someones encryption it should be treated like making a key to their house. Now if you leave the doors wide open who is really to blame.
 
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