Automated License Plate Readers question

needairtime

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So it's okay to share this data with Google if they pay, just like the lending institution as they obviously need to pay the repo guys for this data?
 

rescue161

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I don't know anything about Google or repo guys, but the LSAG systems that we use are not connected to a public server. As far as privacy goes, you can't expect your privacy to be protected when you commit a crime and are trying to hide from being caught. I already covered when and why vehicle registrations show up on an LEO hot list. I assume that financial institutions will put out a similar list to authorized repo agents. If you are not making payments on a car, it is subject to repossession.
 

needairtime

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Ignoring law enforcement/civil crime enforcement, the data is still out there. I don't know how shady repo guys are, I'm sure there are companies out there, perhaps PIs or stalkers or just spouses spying on each other, who would be willing to pay for car location data that is gleaned by miscellaneous companies as incidental data. Is the use of this data legal? What's preventing if not?
 

rescue161

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The LSAG does not transmit the location of tags that it sees. It only sets off an alarm in the patrol car so the officer knows that he just passed the car suspect tag. The LSAG takes a picture of said tag, so the officer can turn around and/or look for the tag based on the vehicle that it is displayed on and the surrounding area in the picture. I would assume that the repo system would work the same. There is no locator of sorts, only a picture is taken when the LSAG camera sees the tag that is in its database.
 

needairtime

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I would suspect law enforcement would be better behaved and do real time query checks, but things like the aforementioned parking enforcement they would have to keep a database else this system would not work (fortunately or not, they are government in my case and similar to law enforcement, hopefully has accountable privacy rules.)

However for the repoman, as they are private, would be happy to keep a database of things they saw. GPS tagging is almost free these days -- heck you can do the license plate scanning with cellular phone without any problems. They might well keep this with the database so they have a record of what and where to snatch...granted they likewise have limited time to get before they move... but getting a location pattern is more helpful for them.
 
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rescue161

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Law enforcement on our side does not use LSAG for parking enforcement. I don't think you're grasping how the system works.

1. A car is stolen, an Amber Alert goes out, a tag expires or is canceled due to being stolen or revoked, etc.

2. A list of the above violations is downloaded into the patrol vehicles LSAG system.

3. Patrol car is doing routine patrols and heard his LSAG alarm. He looks at the laptop and sees a picture of a car that the LSAG system just took of a stolen tag that was on the hot list. The tag is suppose to come back to a 1999 Toyota Camry, but the LSAG picture of the tag shows it displayed on a 2007 Dodge Challenger.

4. Cop turns around, finds Challenger with stolen tag and radios in the info and apprehends the suspect.

There is no automatic violation that is generated or caught by the LSAG, i.e. parking violations or otherwise. What was said above was that a cop can drive through a parking lot and the LSAG will alert him if a vehicle is on the hot list.

You seems to be looking for some sort of conspiracy theory that isn't there.
 

needairtime

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Actually I already said that I don't care about law enforcement using this data and they should be using it legally. The parking violation example I gave they are tracking license plates and they have to store it in some database. I have to give some confidence they are deleting the data (plus it'd make their lives easier) by simply timing out the data after the parking time limit - if they see the plate again, a ticket is issued; if they don't see the plate again because of timeout, everything is fine. Actually in this case I do wish they store GPS locations of where they saw the plate as I'm sure people move around to do other stuff than camp at one place for the whole day.

I just hope they have good security and not "lose" this information to private individuals.

My point is that private companies would happily use this data behind our backs to sell more product whether it be products or services. Call it a conspiracy or not, it's creepy and should be banned.
 

MTS2000des

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My point is that private companies would happily use this data behind our backs to sell more product whether it be products or services. Call it a conspiracy or not, it's creepy and should be banned.
Nonsense. A license plate on a vehicle driven on public roadways/right of ways or visible from public can be photographed, indexed and stored by anyone. You can't trespass one's eyes. If it can be seen from the public, it can be photographed by anyone. The ideology of banning this is moronic. If one doesn't want to be photographed, don't be visible or go out in public.
 

MTS2000des

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China doesn't have the 1st amendment. Public photography is constitutionally protected activity. If one doesn't want to be photographed or looked at, don't go out in public. Simple as that. No need to change the law.
 

ind224

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The plate readers look at patterns. Mail boxes and advertising street signs are mistaken for hits as well. I thought I had a god hit and the plate was correct but the state was wrong. Depending on the system a single camera system with 4 cameras and the laptop that needs 4G card /access for updates is about $16K so as a toy for Joe Average probably not likely. If the registered owner is suspended / wanted and the vehicle is seen by a LEO operated system it will likely get stopped for a check.
 

rja1

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I thought LE need reasonable cause to run your plate. I support LE, but stuff like this doesn't pass the smell test
 

MTS2000des

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I thought LE need reasonable cause to run your plate. I support LE, but stuff like this doesn't pass the smell test
depends on what you mean by "run". Obtaining insurance valid/registration valid status, lots of private companies get this from databases brokered to them by the states and those states get revenue for sharing that data.

for CJIS purposes such as getting driving history on the registered owner via a connection to a CJIS regulated system, yeah, this should be for law enforcement use only.

But nothing can stop someone from jotting down a plate number and noting it's presence anymore than observing a person wearing a red hat or green coat walking down a public street or visible from public. Private property owners can sure track plates/vehicles on their property.
 
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