Back of the scanner antenna vs outdoor antenna?

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sambo613

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I have a GRE PSR-410 scanner. It's located in an home office on the first floor of my house on all flat terrain right by my front door. I currently have a stock antenna that came with it, it's not bad but I would definitely like a better one. I would really prefer an antenna that is relatively easy to install, so I would rather not get up on the roof to install it. The scanner is right by the window, if that helps. Is there an antenna that would be good for me where I could install it ground level that's somewhat smaller, I don't want a large antenna. I listen to fire channels, 150-160 MHz.

Thanks for any help!
 

KF7OQQ

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Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.3; en-us; SCH-I535 Build/JSS15J) AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/534.30)

I use a radio shack mag mount that is stuck to the top of my fridge. That is where my scanner is located too. There is a real big difference between the stock antenna and this one although I only have hand-held scanners with rubber duckies antenna to compare too but. Outside would be better and I am in the process of mounting a different antenna in my attic the mag mount pulls in all the vhf that I listen to here in utah where mountains like to block them.
 

KD9KSO

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Those mag-mounts work really well. I had one attached to a steel plate and stuck it on the gutter of the house I lived in at the time.

I was picking up ATIS from an airport 10 miles away like I was sitting in the aircraft.
 

wk5h

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I picked up the Radio Shack #20-176 for $30 just last week. It might not be too large for what you're wanting (it really is a pretty small antenna), and, it's a very simple, low visibility antenna to put up. I currently have it mounted just a hair taller than my roofline, via a piece of electrical conduit acting as a mast. It's small, lightweight, and so far has lasted in this week's winds (gust of 40MPH+).

An external antenna is night/day difference to most any stock antenna, even if only using a mag mount on the fridge like KF7OQQ mentioned.

For instance, in my upstairs ham shack, using the stock antenna on my BCD536HP, I was just barely able to pick up 2 NOAA stations, each about 40 miles away. Using the antenna I mentioned above, (before I mounted it outside), I was hearing both close in NOAA station with little to no fuzz, and even picked up a 3rd one ~90 miles SW of here (weak, but audible).

After mounting it outside just above the roof line, All 3 of the NOAA stations are now easily heard, and even picking up yet another one around 90 miles NW of here; all 4 plainly audible.

I'm sure there are far better antennas than the one I mentioned, but, I was really hoping to avoid an eyesore and negative responses from the XYL. But for $30, I'm extremely happy with it's performance, both inside, and especially after it went outside.

Good luck!
 
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I got the 176 for 20/clearance at a RS in center city Philly.Got it home & up about 10ft above roofline,30 ft total..

I was all smiles!..Was picking up NJSP to the north and Deleware to the south..Great starter antenna..It will keep the signal coming in from afar so you wont get bored listening..

Good Luck & Cheers!
 

sambo613

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I got the 176 for 20/clearance at a RS in center city Philly.Got it home & up about 10ft above roofline,30 ft total..

I was all smiles!..Was picking up NJSP to the north and Deleware to the south..Great starter antenna..It will keep the signal coming in from afar so you wont get bored listening..

Good Luck & Cheers!
I picked up the Radio Shack #20-176 for $30 just last week. It might not be too large for what you're wanting (it really is a pretty small antenna), and, it's a very simple, low visibility antenna to put up. I currently have it mounted just a hair taller than my roofline, via a piece of electrical conduit acting as a mast. It's small, lightweight, and so far has lasted in this week's winds (gust of 40MPH+).

An external antenna is night/day difference to most any stock antenna, even if only using a mag mount on the fridge like KF7OQQ mentioned.

For instance, in my upstairs ham shack, using the stock antenna on my BCD536HP, I was just barely able to pick up 2 NOAA stations, each about 40 miles away. Using the antenna I mentioned above, (before I mounted it outside), I was hearing both close in NOAA station with little to no fuzz, and even picked up a 3rd one ~90 miles SW of here (weak, but audible).

After mounting it outside just above the roof line, All 3 of the NOAA stations are now easily heard, and even picking up yet another one around 90 miles NW of here; all 4 plainly audible.

I'm sure there are far better antennas than the one I mentioned, but, I was really hoping to avoid an eyesore and negative responses from the XYL. But for $30, I'm extremely happy with it's performance, both inside, and especially after it went outside.

Good luck!
Is this antenna able to be mounted inside? If so where exactly is a good place inside? Thanks!
 

sambo613

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popnokick

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sambo613- Can you run a 75 ohm TV coax cable upstairs to an upper level window or the attic? Do you have any unused TV coax in your house? My house was wired for CATV but I don't use it since I have satellite. So I put a simple antenna in the attic (which also had many junctions on the CATV coax) and connected the attic antenna to a splitter-amp to feed the TV cable for two scanners in the house... one upstairs, one down. Then I simply connect a 75 ohm RG6 jumper from each scanner to the nearest cable TV wall jack. Works great, with very little signal loss. What antenna is in my attic? This:
Homebrewed Off-Center Fed Dipole - The RadioReference Wiki
I started out with the wire version (scroll down past the copper pipe version) to ensure the OCFD would work. Put it together for about $10 and 20 min of time. When that was successful I made the more permanent copper pipe version.
The OCFD works very well on VHF high band, which you wrote was your primary interest. If you can't get to the attic, the wire version can also be hung alongside a window or sliding door and hidden in the curtains. Usually more aesthetically acceptable to other people in the house than attaching a marine antenna to the side of your desk ;-)
 

wa1nic

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Tram Antenna connector.

The Tram marine antenna comes with coax with a PL-259 connector on the end. You would need an adapter to connect it to whatever connector your scanner has on it.
 

wk5h

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Is this antenna able to be mounted inside? If so where exactly is a good place inside? Thanks!
It could be used inside, but, with the ends poking out like they do, you'd have to mount it somewhere out of eyeball height.

If you absolutely have to run an antenna inside your house, WA1NIC's idea of the marine vertical antenna is a much more inside-friendly antenna than the one I mentioned.
 

wa1nic

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marine antenna

FWIW, I am using one of the TRAM marine antennas on a "Dakota Alert" security sensor system. The system uses MURS frequencies to communicate from the sensor to the base.

My receiver is in my basement - not the best place for use with the included telescopic whip antenna. I was having some intermittent issues picking up one of my more remote sensors when the weather was bad.

So I installed the TRAM marine antenna outside... I screwed it to a trim board on the back of my house. Installation took all of 10 minutes. It mounts with 4 wood screws to any flat surface,

I took the time to put my MFJ antenna analyzer on it. The SWR is reasonably low from 150 to 170. For a receiving antenna it works great. I suspect that it would make a decent transmitting antenna as well.

Rick
 
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