BC Highways

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robertmac

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When travelling throughout the province I usually keep on the LADD + the 4x MoT frequencies listed here;

BC Ministry of Highways Scanner Frequencies and Radio Frequency Reference

Indeed LADD 1 can get a bit chatty / filthy at times. I have a IC license to transmit on there so sometimes it helps to call out when its quiet to ask what is going on up ahead. Someone usually answers.
Yes, those are the frequencies I heard most of the highway reports on. I did not use PL codes so only had to enter frequencies once. Unfortunately that list does not say what areas the repeaters are for. I will have to go through each district to find the repeaters used in that area [didn't on this trip but certainly will before another trip]. I really hope that these do not go encrypted. Unfortunately, if one is not licensed or have radio that will transmit on VHF, one can only hope a trucker does this. But with the relatively short distance, one has to be in the right spot at the right time. CB is not an option for me as explained above. I know the mountains present a problem to getting this information out. As BC does not want distracted drivers, at least keeping the highways frequencies can be of help. Or if anyone knows of some very common frequency [other than LADD] that they have listened to from past experience driving through BC would be nice to see it posted here as a few have already.
 

kayn1n32008

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Unfortunately that list does not say what areas the repeaters are for.
there is some maps floating around that shows repeater locations and coverage areas.

I really hope that these do not go encrypted.
I doubt Highways will go to encryption, they have a huge network. To convert it to digital, then encrypt would cost a HUGE amount of money.

Unfortunately, if one is not licensed or have radio that will transmit on VHF, one can only hope a trucker does this.
For $50/yr, it's not expensive to get a license, and be able to legally transmit.

But with the relatively short distance, one has to be in the right spot at the right time.
Usually by the time you hear about an accident, it's already too late. In many areas of the province, bypassing the accident takes hours to accomplish. This is especially true on the TCH. In the winter, when there are fatalities, the highway usually gets shut down overnight. Best thing to do is just hunker down in a hotel until it is reopened.

Or if anyone knows of some very common frequency [other than LADD] that they have listened to from past experience driving through BC would be nice to see it posted here as a few have already.

The one I listed is commonly used on the Coq. 153.635MHz there are others, but it has been so long I can't remember many of them. Arrow Transfer was another, but I don't remember the frequency. I would also toss 140.730MHz in too, it's a commonly assigned simplex frequency in BC and Alberta. Like I said earlier, scan the whole VHF-Hi band when travelling, truckers can be almost anywhere.
 

kayn1n32008

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Yes, those are the frequencies I heard most of the highway reports on. I did not use PL codes so only had to enter frequencies once. Unfortunately that list does not say what areas the repeaters are for. I will have to go through each district to find the repeaters used in that area [didn't on this trip but certainly will before another trip].

This link:

http://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/BC_Ministry_of_Highways_(BC))

Has maps of the repeaters locations, and where they cover. The database indicates that the repeaters listen low, transmit high, but this is not accurate. The repeaters transmit at 143.xxxx and receive at 148.xxxx. I highly recommend putting in the set of four frequencies four times with PL when travelling. It makes identifying what repeater is where much easier.
 
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robertmac

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This link:

http://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/BC_Ministry_of_Highways_(BC))

Has maps of the repeaters locations, and where they cover. The database indicates that the repeaters listen low, transmit high, but this is not accurate. The repeaters transmit at 143.xxxx and receive at 148.xxxx. I highly recommend putting in the set of four frequencies four times with PL when travelling. It makes identifying what repeater is where much easier.
As I reviewed what frequencies I had or needed to put in, it was over the Christmas holidays so didn't look at any maps that I had forgotten. With RCMP gone, I will have to revamp and will put in the PL. I see that most of the highway frequencies I had were in the 143 range so must have got that right. This was my 4th trip in the last 2 years and now that I know that there are only a few frequencies to listen to I may put them in a bank and just listen to them instead of a whole bunch that probably have no activity. This and the LADD thread has helped and I hope it helps others as they go through this area especially in winter.
 
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dwc

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Yes, those are the frequencies I heard most of the highway reports on. I did not use PL codes so only had to enter frequencies once. Unfortunately that list does not say what areas the repeaters are for. I will have to go through each district to find the repeaters used in that area [didn't on this trip but certainly will before another trip]. I really hope that these do not go encrypted. Unfortunately, if one is not licensed or have radio that will transmit on VHF, one can only hope a trucker does this. But with the relatively short distance, one has to be in the right spot at the right time. CB is not an option for me as explained above. I know the mountains present a problem to getting this information out. As BC does not want distracted drivers, at least keeping the highways frequencies can be of help. Or if anyone knows of some very common frequency [other than LADD] that they have listened to from past experience driving through BC would be nice to see it posted here as a few have already.
Sorry for the late reply. Was out of the country for a while there.

Yeah they reuse the same set of freqs throughout the province so I just keep them all in scan. Keeps it simple.

Ladd 1 is where it's at on the highways, I do not know of any others. Indeed, CB is mostly useless in these parts. I know the 4x4 bunch use it a bit here and there but even most of them have migrated to VHF.

P.S. Weird how my reply actually started a new thread.
 

mciupa

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P.S. Weird how my reply actually started a new thread.
I thought it was worthy to split it off from the LADD thread. The informative BC Hwy info would have been buried in the LADD thread.

But, in the end, your suggestion of monitoring them all is the best solution.
 
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kayn1n32008

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Yeah they reuse the same set of freqs throughout the province so I just keep them all in scan. Keeps it simple.
It's nice to see how the agencies in BC have a set channel plan like Highways and BCAS.



Ladd 1 is where it's at on the highways, I do not know of any others. Indeed...
Very true, although there is lots of action on all the LAD channels, plus some of the other unapproved channels, like Plateau amounts others. I'm guessing the Resource Road channels will also start being misused, they would also be worth keeping in scan as well.

CB is mostly useless in these parts...
Pretty much. I would guess that the majority of highway drivers that operate in BC use VHF. Even out here in Alberta, most use VHF here as well.

I know the 4x4 bunch use it a bit here and there but even most of them have migrated to VHF.
NA4WD(Northern Alberta 4 Wheel Drive club) requires its members to either have, or obtain their amateur radio certification as a condition of membership. They use VHF amateur simplex when out wheeling in western Alberta.




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