• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

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    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

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    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

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Business itinerate exempt fees

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W5NIO

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Hi all, I am planning to license my scout troop with an itinerate business license. First off, please don't discuss FRS and GMRS those are a pass if I can get the troop a license. And about amateur radio, I'm working on getting some people in our troop licensed but not everyone.

Mainly I want to know the process of getting a business/industrial itinerate license. I have an FRN because I'm a licensed ham so that's checked off the list. I went on ULS and tried to access the application with 3 different browsers and java versions. I can't seem to get it to work. I printed out the forms and application, as well as the remittance advice form. Is there some magic I can work so the ULS application will actually work?

Also, I am a minor. Should I have any problems getting a license put through? I don't see any area on the form that requires me to show my age.

Next, I want to know about fees. I know the application or the regulatory fee is $60. And there is a filing fee that is $100 or something. Is there a way I can be exempt from one or both of those fees? Our troop is 100% non-profit.

Lastly, if any of you have anything you would like to add please do so.

73s, W5NIO
 
Joined
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Messages
1,217
Location
Tulsa
Before going too far down this road, check with your Council, They may already hold a license that would cover your operation. An FCC license is a legal document and will need to be executed by an authorized agent of the organization. Good luck in your endeavor.
 
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ecps92

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Messages
11,702
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Taxachusetts
Make Contact with the other licensees
License Search Results I'm sure they will help out another Troop or Council
Hi all, I am planning to license my scout troop with an itinerate business license. First off, please don't discuss FRS and GMRS those are a pass if I can get the troop a license. And about amateur radio, I'm working on getting some people in our troop licensed but not everyone.

Mainly I want to know the process of getting a business/industrial itinerate license. I have an FRN because I'm a licensed ham so that's checked off the list. I went on ULS and tried to access the application with 3 different browsers and java versions. I can't seem to get it to work. I printed out the forms and application, as well as the remittance advice form. Is there some magic I can work so the ULS application will actually work?

Also, I am a minor. Should I have any problems getting a license put through? I don't see any area on the form that requires me to show my age.

Next, I want to know about fees. I know the application or the regulatory fee is $60. And there is a filing fee that is $100 or something. Is there a way I can be exempt from one or both of those fees? Our troop is 100% non-profit.

Lastly, if any of you have anything you would like to add please do so.

73s, W5NIO
 

SteveC0625

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Oct 24, 2009
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Northville, NY (Fulton County)
From the fact sheet for filing an FCC 601 application:

FEE EXEMPTION:
Eligibles filing as governmental entities, civil air patrol, stations used in connection with non-commercial educational broadcast stations and duplicate requests (for Broadcast Auxiliary, Cellular, Offshore Radio, Paging and Radiotelephone, and Rural Radio licenses only) are exempt from fee payment. Certain non-profit entities are eligible for a partial fee exemption. If you are uncertain if you qualify, please refer to the current Fee Filing Guide or call (877) 480-3201 (TTY 717-338 -2824).


Here's a link for the complete fact sheet: http://transition.fcc.gov/Forms/Form601/601fs.pdf

As previously pointed out, your Troop or your Council may already have one or more frequencies licensed to them. That's the place to start.
 

NC1

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Messages
629
Location
Surry County, North Carolina
There is always VHF MURS, which does not need a license at all. Of course you are limited to 2 watts, but if you will be using it in a campground setting it would be just fine.

The itinerant frequencies will allow for more transmit power, however, a 5 watt output is pretty much standard on walkie-talkies. There are some that are higher power, but do not go that much further in all reality.

Just remember this before getting a license or purchasing equipment: the VHF band will be far better in wooded areas and over hills than the UHF band. The VHF tends to outperform UHF in going around trees, through foliage, and over/around hills.
 

SCPD

QRT
Joined
Feb 24, 2001
Messages
0
Location
Virginia
As the previous speaker mentioned, MURS is a great option. Licensing is really expensive, and so is equipment. I highly suggest MURS, as it is license and hassle free. The Motorola RMM2050 is a great radio for your situation. It's rugged and can survive a camping trip. It is also usable right out of the box. If you prefer, you can also program it from your PC. It's compatible with Motorola professional accessories too, as this is a business radio. I too am a minor affiliated in a non-profit organization. I am actually a director on a non-profit board and handle communications. I recently helped obtain a license for our organization, however, my parents played a crucial role. I believe an adult would have to be somewhat involved if you choose to get a license since you have to pay and deal with legal processes. Best wishes and good luck from a fellow youth radio enthusiast. I hope to get my GMRS license within this month and to get my ham license over the summer. Again, good luck
-Josh
 

W5NIO

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Thanks to all who replied .

Please add more if anyone has anything else to add.
 
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Messages
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Location
Texas
As the previous speaker mentioned, MURS is a great option. Licensing is really expensive, and so is equipment. I highly suggest MURS, as it is license and hassle free. The Motorola RMM2050 is a great radio for your situation. It's rugged and can survive a camping trip. It is also usable right out of the box. If you prefer, you can also program it from your PC. It's compatible with Motorola professional accessories too, as this is a business radio. I too am a minor affiliated in a non-profit organization. I am actually a director on a non-profit board and handle communications. I recently helped obtain a license for our organization, however, my parents played a crucial role. I believe an adult would have to be somewhat involved if you choose to get a license since you have to pay and deal with legal processes. Best wishes and good luck from a fellow youth radio enthusiast. I hope to get my GMRS license within this month and to get my ham license over the summer. Again, good luck
-Josh
Let's break that down. A RMM2050 currently goes new for ~$189. Compared to a Maxon TS-2000 which can be acquired new for as low as $30 each through a good promotion but still under $100 on a normal day. For a 2W portable that actually performs pretty decently, that itinerant license pays itself off after only a couple of radios in terms of savings.

Sent from my SM-T713 using Tapatalk
 

NC1

Member
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Messages
629
Location
Surry County, North Carolina
MURS IS Licensed by Rule, and you have to follow the rules. Not hassle free.
I think the "hassle free" was in reference to the licensing process, paperwork, fees, and waiting involved as opposed to other services available, not the rules and regulations.

There are rules and regulations to follow no matter which one is selected, but MURS is ready to go as soon as the battery is charged. IMHO that is about as hassle free as you can get when dealing with a radio service. And there are no further licensing fees, ever.
 

SCPD

QRT
Joined
Feb 24, 2001
Messages
0
Location
Virginia
I think the "hassle free" was in reference to the licensing process, paperwork, fees, and waiting involved as opposed to other services available, not the rules and regulations.

There are rules and regulations to follow no matter which one is selected, but MURS is ready to go as soon as the battery is charged. IMHO that is about as hassle free as you can get when dealing with a radio service. And there are no further licensing fees, ever.
Let's break that down. A RMM2050 currently goes new for ~$189. Compared to a Maxon TS-2000 which can be acquired new for as low as $30 each through a good promotion but still under $100 on a normal day. For a 2W portable that actually performs pretty decently, that itinerant license pays itself off after only a couple of radios in terms of savings.

Sent from my SM-T713 using Tapatalk
Thanks! Yes, rules are not hard to follow. In response to the one who brought up pricing, Motorola RMM2050s are expensive, but name brand quality business radios all fall in that price range. Again, I take care of a fleet of Baofengs and let me tell you that you get what you pay for. You pay cheap prices, you get cheap products. One drop and the Baofeng is dead as a doornail until it can get revived by a charger (if you are lucky). Sure, 30 dollars is a good price for a radio, but you will get 30 dollar quality. I can open up my window, throw my RMM2050 as hard as I can out into the street, step on it, kick it to the curb, and it will transmit. Try that with the Maxon TS-2000, and your radio is probably done for.
 
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