Buying R75. What do I NEED?

Status
Not open for further replies.

safetyobc

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2004
Messages
3,354
Location
South Arkansas
I am saving up for an Icom R75.

I am also going to buy a SWL Antenna. Probably this one.

What type of coax and ends do I need? I have no clue about this stuff. I am assuming I can buy a certain length of coax with the ends already installed so all I have to do is hook it up?

I may put the antenna in my attic. If so my coax length will only need to be probably 25 feet or so. If I go outdoors with it, I may need 50 feet of coax. Not sure if that would matter much at those frequencies?

Any other accessories or parts that are needed for monitoring the HF bands?

(I am slowly saving. Just trying to get an idea of price. I am half way to the R75 now, so it will be a while before buying lol).

Thanks!
 

nanZor

Active Member
Joined
May 28, 2009
Messages
2,807
At the same store, you'll find pre-assembled coax jumpers with PL-259 plugs at each end. You could pick up the RG-8X in a variety of lengths. At hf, these should be fine with your lengths listed.

I also read in one of the reviews of a guy using RG-6, so if you wanted to use that all you'd need are two female F to male PL259 adapters. I don't see any problem with using 75 ohm RG6 in this application, but then again I've never used a par end-fedz antenna. The fm/airband filters I use from PAR work well.

I've got a feeling you are starting out and really don't have any specific needs, so unless you want to homebrew, this combination will definitely give you a starting point which you can refine later. It would be hard to recommend anything if you don't have anything specific - other than to think about homebrewing your own. Be sure to check the HF antenna wiki.

I'd avoid the attic if you can - low mounting height, coupling to other junk up there, and no real ground which it looks like the PAR wants to use unless you just cross your fingers, might be a tough call.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

jaspence

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
2,266
Location
Michigan
Cableing for new scanner

If you buy coax with PL-259 connectors pre-installed, you may have problems getting it through tight places, so check where the cable run has to go carefully. I would avoid adapters if possible, as that is just one more connection than can degrade the signal, especially if you mount it outside.
 

N5DRM

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 16, 2010
Messages
21
Location
North Little Rock, AR
Re: IC-R75.

An excellent choice for an HF receiver. I have one and love it. The antenna you linked to is a good one, but wondered if you are into building one yourself and saving about $70 dollars? I ask because I built my own, basically the same one you're looking at buying, from an instruction I found online. A fellow ham and SWL in the UK posted it. I'm using it with a 50' wire and have excellent coverage all across the bands. My primary listening is to civil air, government and some WXFAX, and Amateur Radio. If you want, I have the materials on hand to build another one and get it to you. I'm in North Little Rock. Send me an email to (david@n5drm.com) and we'll go from here. I also have many documents: Phil's cookbook, filter selection tips, the Icom receiver service manual and much more I'll put on a CD and send it to you. I use about 25' of Belden RG-58 coax from the outside location to the receiver. The antenna is well grounded and I have no issues with noise or local interference. I'll be happy to help any way I can. BTW, I'm the LilKase guy from a few years ago. We did some business I recall. Hope to hear from you.
Take care.
David
N5DRM
 

safetyobc

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2004
Messages
3,354
Location
South Arkansas
I attempted to email you but it returned delivery failure at that email.

Here is the email:

Hello David!

Good to hear from you on the rr forums. Last I remember you moved out west. Glad you are back in Arkansas and hope all is well with you and your family.

I am very interested in building my own antenna. I don't know much about Antennas but am eager to learn. I am quite a ways from being able to buy my R75. Saving is slow with 3 kids lol. But I do want one and hope to have one by the end of summer do there is no real rush on getting an antenna up. I would like to have it in place when I get the R75.

I would also love any freqs you monitor from here in AR. HF is unknown ground for me. I currently have a Degen DE1103 (same as the Kaito 1103).

At some point in the distant future I want to get my Amateur Radio License, General Class so I can work HF. But that I well down the road.

Any info you can share would be much appreciated!!

Thanks!

Matt
 

ridgescan

Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2008
Messages
4,699
Location
San Francisco, Ca.
If you buy coax with PL-259 connectors pre-installed, you may have problems getting it through tight places, so check where the cable run has to go carefully. I would avoid adapters if possible, as that is just one more connection than can degrade the signal, especially if you mount it outside.
I agree. Building your own coax ends is very easy and kinda satifying (lol) you should learn to build too. I have seen it come in very handy several times over-you tend to change setups and configurations in this hobby
here's a sample video I personally like
PL-259 Installation Made Easy for RG8X - YouTube

have fun with your r75-great radio I love mine:)
also-I use LMR240 coax as my feedline- it is the LMR400's 'little brother' with close #s to the 400 and is outstanding shield wise and weatherwise-but very very seldom mentioned anywhere. Good prices too. Between its double shielding and a good 2-point ground system here, I have a nice noise situation.
 
Last edited:

nmelfi

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 24, 2011
Messages
498
Location
Travelers Rest S.C.
I chose the par end fed for my r75 and it worked good. Then I went to tractor supply and bought a quarter mile long spool of #17 electric fence wire for about 20 bucks and strung 400 feet of it in place of the supplied wire. I grounded the sheild of my Rg6 quad shield on the par transformer to my house electrical ground and have little noise problems and can pick up more than I have time to listen to!
 

nmelfi

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 24, 2011
Messages
498
Location
Travelers Rest S.C.
I was worried about the galvanized part because of the small amount of lead in it, but it works fine. I am planning on running a couple hundred more feet of it and trying it as a giant loop antenna.
 

ridgescan

Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2008
Messages
4,699
Location
San Francisco, Ca.
I chose the par end fed for my r75 and it worked good. Then I went to tractor supply and bought a quarter mile long spool of #17 electric fence wire for about 20 bucks and strung 400 feet of it in place of the supplied wire. I grounded the sheild of my Rg6 quad shield on the par transformer to my house electrical ground and have little noise problems and can pick up more than I have time to listen to!
gees I believe ya! That sounds like one potent antenna!
 

nmelfi

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Apr 24, 2011
Messages
498
Location
Travelers Rest S.C.
I hear a closed loop makes it less prone to noise, any input as to running another couple hundred feet and making it a loop?
 

bigblue2

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jan 6, 2012
Messages
13
Location
Mississauga, Ontario, CANADA
So how would I go about connecting that to my radio?
Buy an MFJ-1779A, a single band dipole 265 feet used for 160M then connect your 400 feet (200 feet each for the pair) by wiring the ends, then connect the coax to the back of the radio usually it has PL-259 coax connector. Buy the coax connector for 3 dollars each, 12 feet or 20 feet. Then connect them. But I stand to be corrected.

Or disassemble the MFJ-1779A and replace it with your 400 foot wire or paste half of the wire in ceiling or V-shaped from your window in 4th floor to backyard..or whatever you think would work or ask for advice.
 
Last edited:

safetyobc

Member
Joined
Sep 25, 2004
Messages
3,354
Location
South Arkansas
Thinking of picking up a used R71a or R72 to save a little money. Any thoughts on that? Good/Bad decision or should I just save and go for the 75?

Thanks!
 

trap5858

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
756
Location
Doylestown PA
Have you looked at the reviews on E-ham.com? There are some interesting thoughts by people who own those radios. I, myself am looking for an R-75. The R-71 seems to get good press on that site so it is worth a look. What I have seen on E-bay are the prices for those radios are not a whole lot lower than an decent used R-75.
 

bigblue2

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jan 6, 2012
Messages
13
Location
Mississauga, Ontario, CANADA
Don't fall for the myth on R-75 speakers. They're crispy clear. Weak signals usually result in garbled voice but once my radio got hold of 1 Mhz and they were crispy clear, I was enlightened. They all depend on antennas. Read Monitoring Times. You're come across those who specialize on Longwave listening and their radios are R-75s. They're the best! Believe me! Imagine these longwave listeners catching 200 khz crispy clear on their R-75 radios!
 

abear27

Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2011
Messages
57
Location
Regina, SK
I picked up an R75 about a month ago - It's a fantastic piece of hardware and easy to get started with.

I live in a townhouse where I can't really put much of an outdoor antenna up, however I do have 50ft of speakerwire spread around the house and the results are surprisingly decent. I am getting EAMs on the HF-GCS freqs and aircraft on the NAT-D freqs.

I am quite sure once I can properly ground the radio and get together some kind of proper antenna my results will improve. The learning and experimentation is half the fun!
 
Last edited:

KE4RWS

Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2004
Messages
291
Location
South Florida
Icom IC-R75 for sure . . .

I picked up an IC-R71a around 1997 from my employer who was auctioning off loads of items at the time. I also picked up an IC-R7000 at the same time, as the two models go together rather nicely. I was working for General Dynamics during this period and they had numerous R71's and R7000's & Kenwood R5000's to choose from so I kind of had my pick of which one's I wanted. I also got one of the Kenwood R5000's and I liked it better than the R71a. These are indeed some fine receivers to say the least.

I just bought a used Icom R75 last month and I have to say I've been thoroughly impressed with this receiver. It's smaller and lighter than the R71a and is quite sensitive. Of course, the antenna is the critical link in one's ability to hear anything so you shouldn't skimp in this area.

Unfortunately, I live in an apartment complex now so I'm very limited in the antenna department, which is truly a shame. I did manage to *hide* my antenna in an oak tree so I'll have to see if the on-site staff calls me on it. I doubt they can see it but you never know when it comes to this kind of thing.

Personally, I would take the R75 over the R71a but that's ME. A friend was trying to get me to buy his Radio Shack DX-394 when I was trying to determine which model receiver I wanted to buy this time around. Believe it or not the DX-394 was actually a fairly good receiver and I have to say I was quite impressed with it's performance as well but the seller just wanted too much money for what he had. However, for the right price the DX-394 wouldn't have been a bad purchase. I glad I spent the extra $$ and went with the Icom R75 though, as it's a super-nice HF & 6-meter receiver, and 6-meters is a bonus band the R71 (and the DX-394) does NOT have. However, the Kenwood R5000 receiver had an optional Hi-Band VHF module you could add to it that went up to 174 MHz I believe, although it's typically more pricey vs. the R75. My used R75 had two optional SSB filters, which sweetened the deal even more. I really love my R75 and it was worth every penny.

I'm sure by now you've already purchased a receiver but I wanted to throw this out there anyway in case someone else is also trying to decide what to buy. Whatever receiver you bought I hope you've been enjoying it and it meets your approval. There's nothing worse than buying a radio only to discover it isn't quite what you wanted.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top