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Cable TV outlets for scanner?

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radio10-8

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Dish TV installer came out and installed the dish for my TV room, kitchen and extra bedroom. The master bedroom and my office were not installed. This means that the RG-6 cable that is inside the wall and runs back to the control box are available for me to use. My idea was to connect the rg-58 or rg-6 cable from the antenna on the roof and connect that cable to the outlet for the office. run a cable from teh out with a bnc into my scanner?
Question? to many connectors? to far of a run? ideas good or bad??
 

kc4jgc

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Virginia Beach, VA
Some thoughts/ideas

First thing you'll need to consider is that CATV cable is 75 ohms as most coax for communications use is 50 ohms. Scanner antenna inputs are 50 ohms. You'll need to figure out how to compensate for the impedance mismatch at both ends. Some sort of impedance transformer (75>50 ohms) should do the trick.

I don't know what you mean by a "control box". In a typical CATV house cableling (assuming more than one outlet), from the drop outside before the cable enters the house, there should be a splitter. The output ports on that splitter have inherant losses. If there are more splitters beyond that first, the losses add up.

If you can figure out which cable runs to your office from the splitter outside, you can replace the splitter with a barrel connector.

As for as length of run is concerned, I don't think you'll have a problem as long as you can solve the impedance issue and there are no more splitters between your office and the outside. You can find out for sure by checking the cableling inside from where your office cable fishes through the wall to either the attic or basement/crawlspace on its way to the outside.

If you're willing to get dirty, I say go for it! That's what experimentation is all about!
 

radio10-8

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Into the attic I will go! Looking at the diagram the builder left me I think it should be fairly easy to determine the wiring.
 

k0pwo

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Location
Centennial Colorado
As long as your are going to use this cable for a scanner it will not care and the scanner will not even notice the impedence mismatch. As for the cable length, in most typical homes this will not be an issue for uhf and vhf freqs. It might cause quite a bit of loss if you are using it for 800mhz. I would go ahead and do it and see how it works.
 

N9JIG

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radio10-8 said:
Dish TV installer came out and installed the dish for my TV room, kitchen and extra bedroom. The master bedroom and my office were not installed. This means that the RG-6 cable that is inside the wall and runs back to the control box are available for me to use. My idea was to connect the rg-58 or rg-6 cable from the antenna on the roof and connect that cable to the outlet for the office. run a cable from teh out with a bnc into my scanner?
Question? to many connectors? to far of a run? ideas good or bad??
Don't worry about impedance mis-match, scanners work great with 75 ohm cable, in fact that usually works better than 50 ohm. As long as you aren't transmitting thru it you are fine with that.

TV antennas work very well with scanners as they cover very similar frequency ranges. Even amps and splitters work well with both TV and scanner receivers. While TV antennas are horizontally polarized and scanners listen to comms that are normally vertical, chances are you won't notice a difference.

Use an F-BNC adapter and try it, if it works then you are all set. If it doesn't you only lost the cost of the adapter.

I used a MATV system on a scanner in my old apartment and it worked great.
 
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