California State Parks 2019 Reorganization

mcjones2013

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2012
Messages
283
Location
Sacramento, Calif.
Hello all,

In July, California State Parks issued its 2019 map which had some district/park unit reorganization when compared to the 2018 map. I've attached a text file with the park units and the districts they fall under, and a 2018 map (.jpg) and a 2019 map (.pdf).

There's a lot of smaller to moderate changes, including different park units now under falling under different districts due to boundary line adjustments, district disbanding, district merging, etc.

Some larger changes of note:
  • Two of the OHV districts (San Andreas, Twin Cities) have been disbanded, and the OHV units they managed now fall under the wide-area DPR district they are physically located in.
  • The other two OHV districts (Oceano Dunes, Ocotillo Wells) are now (more-or-less) regular wide-area DPR districts. With this, they have expanded their boundaries and taken some park units from the adjoining districts they squeezed.
    • The Colorado Desert District is now considerably smaller due to Ocotillo Wells District boundary expansion.
  • The Tehachapi District has been renamed to the Great Basin District and realigned its boundaries. It has lost the Providence Mountains SRA, now part of the Inland Empire District.
  • A newly formed Diablo Range District has taken a large part of the eastern portion of the Bay Area District, the northern portion of the Monterey District, and the western portion of the Gold Fields District.
    • The Bay Area District is now mainly Marin County and portions of Sonoma and Napa counties.
I'm not sure if/what any new district callsigns are in effect.

As far as database radio changes, there's some work that needs to be done, nothing too major. Most if not all of the mountain top repeaters likely have the same park unit assignments, just the district organization within the database needs some work. I can try to get this submitted.
 

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Paysonscanner

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Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Messages
247
Location
Closer to family now
Hello all,

In July, California State Parks issued its 2019 map which had some district/park unit reorganization when compared to the 2018 map. I've attached a text file with the park units and the districts they fall under, and a 2018 map (.jpg) and a 2019 map (.pdf).

There's a lot of smaller to moderate changes, including different park units now under falling under different districts due to boundary line adjustments, district disbanding, district merging, etc.

Some larger changes of note:
  • Two of the OHV districts (San Andreas, Twin Cities) have been disbanded, and the OHV units they managed now fall under the wide-area DPR district they are physically located in.
  • The other two OHV districts (Oceano Dunes, Ocotillo Wells) are now (more-or-less) regular wide-area DPR districts. With this, they have expanded their boundaries and taken some park units from the adjoining districts they squeezed.
    • The Colorado Desert District is now considerably smaller due to Ocotillo Wells District boundary expansion.
  • The Tehachapi District has been renamed to the Great Basin District and realigned its boundaries. It has lost the Providence Mountains SRA, now part of the Inland Empire District.
  • A newly formed Diablo Range District has taken a large part of the eastern portion of the Bay Area District, the northern portion of the Monterey District, and the western portion of the Gold Fields District.
    • The Bay Area District is now mainly Marin County and portions of Sonoma and Napa counties.
I'm not sure if/what any new district callsigns are in effect.

As far as database radio changes, there's some work that needs to be done, nothing too major. Most if not all of the mountain top repeaters likely have the same park unit assignments, just the district organization within the database needs some work. I can try to get this submitted.
Take a look at this document below. This is the most current as DPR's website doesn't show a 2019 version yet. My late husband kept up with this and was in the middle of researching repeaters/frequencies to match them up with districts, sectors and individual parks. This was in his last healthy year, early 2016 and he did not complete it. The RR DB did not show the correct districts, sectors and parks at that time. He was going to send the work he did to a friend that was still a RR member in order to have it submitted to the DB. His health declined and he didn't get it done. Now I have all his work in a box along with some other uncompleted projects. There is no way I have time to finish his project, it required a lot of FCC license searching and he only got part of one district done.

This document has the district, sector and park listing starting on page 142. Matching frequencies and repeaters to this is tough. He left a note that frequencies match districts and often the sectors nearly all the time. The coastal units are more complicated as they have lifeguard frequencies in many parks in addition to the frequencies used by the rangers and maintenance. Hubby printed out this multi paged listing every year for insertion in his "California State Natural Resource Agency" notebook. We tried to field check the FCC info we got, but getting all over the state every year was not possible. We could hear a lot of coastal range and Sierra foothill traffic where we lived, but 800 megs made that a limited effort.

Well, the document is too large to copy to here. I will post a link to the DPR website page that has a link so you can download it. Remember you want to quickly go to page 142. There is a lot of information here that can distract you from the radio system useful info.

 
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