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CDM talkaround range.

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12dbsinad

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You may or may not be aware, but you need to legally be able to use these radios in "talkaround" mode. So, that's why i asked what type of radio service you intend to use. Having a UHF radio and a quarter wave antenna doesn't give such specifics.

To answer your question, it depends on if you're talking mobile to mobile, mobile to portable, or mobile to a base station, and of course your elevation.
 

Cmalan1213

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glastonbury, ct
I think most of the time it would be mobile to portable, for example when we do search and rescue and were on fireground or on main to hear dispatch but not bother dispatch with our o/s comm. is mobile to mobile farther range? And portable to base even more?
 

WA0CBW

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Shawnee Kansas (Kansas City)
The factors that determine the distance you can talk are height of the antenna, line of sight to the antenna, and finally the power of the transmitters. The first two go hand-in-hand somewhat. If there is a line-of-sight obstruction between you and the antenna then height probably won't help. Additional factors include the loss of the coax and the gain of the antenna. Talkaround is simply talking AND receiving on the same frequency as the repeater output. The base station (and other users) may or may not be able to hear you when you are in talkaround depending on your proximity to everyone else and the factors described above.
BB
 

12dbsinad

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It is difficult to give even a semi accurate guess on talk around distance givin all kinds of variables. It could range from 50 miles (or more) talking from mobile to mobile both on high elevations with no obstructions, to just a few miles if there is an obstacle in the way between the 2 radios. It just all depends.

I would suggest talking to the radio shop that handles your radio communications for your search and rescue, fire dept, etc. Tell them what you want to do and they can give a direction to proceed, this would also have to include a valid frequency that is properly licensed for your application, something your agency may or may not have depending on what exactly you want to do.
 

PACNWDude

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You are in a flat part of the country, but buildings and obstructions will be an issue.

The company I work for uses talk-around and about 45 watts on CDM1250 UHF radios. We use the same Laird 1/4 wave antennas on vehicles, but larger Morad antennas on vessels.

Typical range CDM1250 to CDM1250 is about 8-10 miles. I am in WA State, so lots of trees and hills. On the coast, near water the best has been 17 miles.

Now the CDM1250 to handheld 5 watt radio. The CDM1250 can be heard a lot further away than handheld to mobile obviously due to its higher power. The PR1500 UHF handhelds only get out a couple of miles, unless we use our repeater network.
 
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