Charlotte proposes banning scanners at DNC

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Farscan

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The DNC attendees must be a rough group if they have to ban all those items as the conventions are for a hand picked group.
 

smokeybehr

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I can see a HUGE fight if a Part 97 licensee gets his HT taken by the cops because they don't know the difference between a radio and a scanner.

It's also the reason why my my usual HT is a commercial radio.
 

trumpetman

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I don't imagine this will be a problem unless someone just wants to stir up a mess. Those that live in Charlotte (most at least), are smart enough to avoid the uptown area and will listen from a distance.
 

MTS2000des

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I can see a HUGE fight if a Part 97 licensee gets his HT taken by the cops because they don't know the difference between a radio and a scanner.

It's also the reason why my my usual HT is a commercial radio.
How so? you think a ham license means property owners can't place restrictions on what is brought into a private event? Do you think having a ham license means you can take your HT anywhere you want, regardless of what private property owners upon which you are granted CONDITIONAL ENTRY set as house rules?

Sorry, but this sounds as ludicrous as those in the concealed carry community that are under the delusion that their CCW somehow trumps a private property owners' rights to NOT have weapons on THEIR property. One's "right" (which a license doesn't grant you BTW) ends where another persons begins.

If I don't want you and your HT's, scanners, cellphones, or whatever on my property or my event, that is my RIGHT. What's the problem with that?
The DNC is not a public park. (Yeah, even there they have rules and restrictions on what is permitted and what is not)

And what does NC state law classify as a "scanning receiver"? Even your part 90 radio might fall in that category if it's capable of scan (most are) and can be programmed to RX public safety frequencies (hard to find a part 90 radio that isn't)

If the house rules, say NO SCANNERS, leave the radios at home, unless you have specific authorization otherwise. I really don't see what the big deal is or why this is news. Why can't people just respect that.

Don't agree? Than don't go.
 
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SCPD

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NC State Law does not classify a "scanning receiver" as the State of North Carolina has no scanner laws. And PRB-1 trumps local restrictions.
 
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SCPD

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I probably would not take my scanner to a major sports event neither.
I take mine and use a discrete earphone. There can be some interesting things to listen to that might affect me, such as parking lot problems, rain delays and problems with a spectator in the audience. Even if it doesn't affect me the traffic can be interesting. At local football games I know many of the people that coach and many of the kids. Sometimes when an injury occurs I may know the player and I can hear the disposition of the injury when treated by paramedics. I hear a detailed report when they begin treatment if transport to the hospital is. The local high school doesn't have the resources to encrypt so I think everything is hard wired, but they didn't do this until about ten years ago. The concern stemmed from the possibility an opposing team might hear their discussion.

Back in the early 80's some colleges used radio among themselves on the field and with the press box coaches. My nephew played for Stanford then and I would take my scanner to the games. I would try to be discrete when I learned what play was called. A few times the people around me overheard the discussion among our family, then would shout it out to everyone in earshot. Now all that stuff is encrypted, which took the fun out of it.

This event, like any large political event, has safety and security concerns. I guess that very little of the traffic is encrypted and I don't understand why so much traffic would be in the clear. I don't know if an incident occurred at similar events that involved a scanner that resulted in security concerns. Paranoia might be a factor or they just want to cover their butts just in case. Remember that the President will be there as well and the security for him, of course, is about the heaviest in the world.

I understand the Republican convention four years ago had heavy security as well. I remember a long thread that discussed it. It is not the convention participants causing the security concerns. Some groups try to disrupt the proceedings. For those who are much younger than my 61 years you should search for information about the 1968 Democrat Convention in Chicago. It is a good illustration of what can go wrong.
 
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greenthumb

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Meh. Seems like a non-story to me. If you're attending the event (which is usually a hand-picked group) you're probably there to do things other than listen to a police scanner! Besides, venues ban devices for events based on business decisions, so it's much like the prohibition of taking your HD video camera with studio-quality recording equipment to your favorite band's concert.
 

MTS2000des

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NC State Law does not classify a "scanning receiver" as the State of North Carolina has no scanner laws. And PRB-1 trumps local restrictions.
PRB-1 does not prohibit property owners from prohibiting the operation of radio devices or anything else.

It's a private event. It's not a public park.

You have no "right" to take your radios, or anything else, onto someone else's property- if they don't want them there, that is their RIGHT. PRB-1, ECPA, part 90/97 doesn't have anything to do with it.

But this might apply, specifically article 22 14-32:

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/pdf/ByArticle/Chapter_14/Article_22.pdf

So go ahead and insist on being "that guy" and boisterously proclaim PRB-1 or whatever FCC rubbish you want to protest with.

and watch who leaves with bracelets on.

it's just a radio. leave it in the car or at home sometime.
 

MTS2000des

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Meh. Seems like a non-story to me. If you're attending the event (which is usually a hand-picked group) you're probably there to do things other than listen to a police scanner! Besides, venues ban devices for events based on business decisions, so it's much like the prohibition of taking your HD video camera with studio-quality recording equipment to your favorite band's concert.
all I was trying to say. but then everyone comes back with this horse manure about Federal law, their "rights"....eh, what happened to a property owner's right to set restrictions on their property?

can I come to your house and bring my used toilet paper? why do people think just because they have a radio, this is some blanket license to be obnoxious? it's bad enough everyone has a cellphone.

I'm the first guy to have a portable with me- for work- and I'm O/C. sure it's cool to listen in, but if you're going to a private event and they have house rules, you have to respect them.
 

RadioDitch

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Besides, venues ban devices for events based on business decisions, so it's much like the prohibition of taking your HD video camera with studio-quality recording equipment to your favorite band's concert.
Little different. That's more than just a business decision, and usually isn't the venue. 90% of the time that call is a contract stipulation put in by either the tour manager, artist, or the recording label. In the industry it's considered no different than file-sharing or a run of the mill copyright violation. It's also a protection toward the tour photographer, press, production staff, etc for various purposes. I work in the music industry on the press side of things, so this makes sense.

Back on topic, the banning of receivers from a private event for what is obviously in the minds of policy makers a security issue doesn't seem out of line. You're talking about an event with some very high profile individuals, including the President of The United States, the first lady, possibly their children, his staff. Does someone have the right to ban your Part 90 or Part 97 device and it's use from their property? Yes, same as cell phones. The federal laws that exist only protect your right to communication on your own or public property.

And read PRB-1 again. It states nothing about private individuals, and provides protection only from any government body below the federal level, or any situation where the courts are involved.
 
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kg4ojj

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DNC Security needs to use the same folks as the PGA Tour events use.....

I was working in a medical capacity and couldn't have my cellphone during the tournament. Day after day, they were looking for it. Good thing I had two of them.....

I know the USSS will be sharper than the PGA security team.

If you attend and have to listen, why not use Bluetooth headset and a scanner app on your phone?

I'd rather listen from the park with little to no restrictions than to be inside.....

My two cents,
 
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