• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

Chineese Radios/Established brands

E5911

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
390
I am looing for a new dual band,
And it got me thinking....
Is there any real difference in radios build in china for the world market
I mean the following radios are essentially the same
YaesuFTM300R except for C4FM
BtechUX50x2
TYT TH-8600
Retevis RT-95
Midland DB2500
now except for the Yaesu the radios are the same yes?
I guess my question is that is there any quality difference or is it one factory belching out the same crap?
Has Yaesu gone down the rabbit hole or do they really tell their builder what kind of quality they want?

I have herd of Chinese names cloning Moto, Kenwood icom gear and changing this or that to prevent a trademark dispute .
How good is this stuff technically , I mean on the bench?
Does the quality come from the engineer at Moto who demands this or that chip or firmware, or is more functional, we want the radio to do this or that (dmr-Trunking C4FM, etc)


Maybe beating a dead horse but im curious, would love to put them all on a service monitor to really see....
 

mmckenna

I ♥ Ø
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
13,523
Location
SNCZCA01DS0
A lot of the cheap Chinese radios have no/little filtering and don't perform well in high RF environments. Their specs are all over the place. Quality control can be lacking to non-existent.
You would pay more for better quality control. Depends on what that is worth to you.
I've had a user at work that tried to bring in some cheap Baofengs on one of my UHF systems. They sounded like complete and total crap. Replacing them with a quality radio resolved the issue. I've put the Baofengs on a service monitor and was not impressed. The user barely got the $25 worth of radio they paid for.

Might be the same factory, but a reputable brand will pay extra for the QC to get a reliable product. Despite what some will claim, the Chinese can do QC very well, it just costs money. Companies looking to make quick buck will bypass paying for the additional QC to get the product out the door cheaper, thus boosting profits.
 

MTS2000des

Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2008
Messages
3,514
Location
Cobb County, GA Stadium Crime Zone
The problem with the China radios is their reliance on the "WOC" chipsets which are low rent, price point chips designed for consumer grade electronics like FRS/GMRS bubble packs, kiddie talkes, etc. Putting adequate filtering on RX and TX can clean things up, but these will never meet or beat performance of "real" radios designed with higher quality front end component stages and more advanced transmitter/controller circuitry.
Traditional manufacturers, while they may use application specific ICs for things like IF, front end RF amps, etc, they are generally of much higher quality and aren't cut rate circuits which is why the radios cost double even triple the price of the low end radios.
 

twotoejoe

Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2017
Messages
195
Location
Clarkesville, Georgia
I have a TYT-9800, a quad band radio, that is supposed to be a clone of the Yaesu-8900. It was not cheap, but less expensive. It seems to be doing a good job, especially with crossbanding.
 

iMONITOR

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Sep 20, 2006
Messages
8,315
Location
MACOMB, MI.
Cheap Chineese Radios = UGO CARS
Stick with
Yaesu
Kenwood
Icom
Companys that have been around for years that have built a good reputation.

Where does Alinco fall into the mix? I think they have facilities in both China and Japan.
 

buddrousa

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 5, 2003
Messages
8,015
Location
NW Tenn
Companys that have been around for years that have built a good reputation. I had one 36 years ago.
 

buddrousa

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 5, 2003
Messages
8,015
Location
NW Tenn
I have a TYT-9800, a quad band radio, that is supposed to be a clone of the Yaesu-8900. It was not cheap, but less expensive. It seems to be doing a good job, especially with crossbanding.
I started to buy one but the MD380 software is so clunky and I saw several negative post on several Ham Sites.
 

buddrousa

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 5, 2003
Messages
8,015
Location
NW Tenn
The 380 software often crashes on 64bit OS had to keep a xp laptop around just to play with the 380 as a cheap option for DMR in the day.
The transmitter on my 380's looked like a sawed off shotgun on the service monitor at the shop. The reason it was used as receive only in the day.
 

alcahuete

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jul 24, 2015
Messages
1,108
Location
Antelope Acres, California
380 software works great on Win7 64-bit. I have been using it for ages, and not a single crash.

Doesn't fix the service monitor part. LOL!! Haven't put mine on one, but I'm sure it's the same. I don't use it for transmitting anyway, just receiving.
 

cmjonesinc

Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2011
Messages
843
My only complaint with my tyt 9800 was the volume was a bit low. I was using it in a loud environment and eventually swapped it out with a kenwood 790/890 setup. But as for in the shack, it's just fine. I find myself bouncing between the tyt software and chirp for programming it. Overall not a bad radio for what it is. The software for it is less clunky than the 380 for me and more stable. Out of all the ccr's I've used the tyt's seem to be at the upper level of quality for them. Not professional gear by any means but far better than a baofeng.
 

NC1

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
617
Location
Surry County, North Carolina
I have a TYT-9800, a quad band radio, that is supposed to be a clone of the Yaesu-8900. It was not cheap, but less expensive. It seems to be doing a good job, especially with crossbanding.
I have one of those as well and have had zero issues for the past two years. The radio works just as I expected it to, the software is operating without a glitch, and others I know who own one are very happy with theirs. I guess what really matters after all the discussion is said and done is the experience of the end user as a whole, not some test equipment readings that fall short of spec or don't compare equally to name brands - and I have seen test equipment that isn't up to par also.
 

W8WCA

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 1, 2005
Messages
251
Location
Columbus, OH
I have one of the HYS TC-8900R's So far it seems good - but I am really just getting started with it

They are not as easy to find as theTYT9800
But I can use RT Systems software for the FT8900 and it works fine
 

E5911

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
390
What is your impression of the new Yaesu? Visibly it looks like the rest of them ...
 

W6BAR

Newbie
Joined
Jun 10, 2020
Messages
2
I've played with several different Chinese radios, along with having equipment by the established players. Sensitivity to RF (especially while near computers, cell phones, and in cars) has made these nearly unusable for me.. I found one brand, Wouxon, which in terms of sensitivity to RF and build quality is definitely a step above Baofeng. The one I have, which I linked fulfilled my desire to have an HT better than the Baofeng in recieve/transmit quality while not paying the $700+ for a duty rated Kenwood or Motorola.
 

n1das

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2003
Messages
1,433
Location
Nashua, NH
Until the big M lawsuit, Hytera made very good radios and were a major player in DMR.
Hytera still does make some very good radios but the /\/\ lawsuit forced some features to be removed from affected models. What Hytera DMR radios I currently own are my last Hyteras.
 

krokus

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
4,498
Location
Southeastern Michigan
Wouxon ... fulfilled my desire to have an HT better than the Baofeng in recieve/transmit quality while not paying the $700+ for a duty rated Kenwood or Motorola.
Kenwood TH-D72 and TH-D74 do/did retail in the $500 (US) range. Both are well above the CCRs in quality and performance.
 
Top