Chp moving away from low band?

E5911

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Thought I saw a Charger with no low band antenna. Getting off low band?
 

norcalscan

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They like to clip them down to the A Pillar driver's side. Makes it low profile. There's a notch in the pillar. However looking back I may not have been looking at a Charger, since those antennas are center cab mounted I thought? This one had a ball mount on the rear driver's side if I recall, possibly a Camaro but I thought those were flushed through the fleet.
 

mcjones2013

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Here in Sacramento, the cars assigned to the Capitol Protection Section almost always have their antennas clipped, as @norcalscan mentioned. They can still transmit on the low-band when they help the freeway units.
 

ko6jw_2

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There has been a lengthy thread on this going on for several weeks. Suggest you search for it.

The short answer is "NO" not a chance. No digital either on low band.
 

KK6ZTE

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Some of the chargers have a "low profile" antenna on the right rear quarter panel that looks like an OE-style antenna. It's not that noticeable unless you're looking for it, one of the head honchos out of the Santa Maria office runs a dark blue unmarked Charger.

Once you see it, you'll recognize that it's a bit larger than normal.
 

norcalscan

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I had a friend tell me normal Chargers have in-window AM/FM antennas and small siriusXM/gps fin, so any external antenna on a Charger should "mark" any unmarked.
 

E5911

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No I did not think so either just saw the car and did not see a antenna. With all the discussion about CIRS I thought I wasnt payinjg attention.

I think however eventually you will see the end of the OES and other VHF mutual Aid networks
 

ko6jw_2

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We are off the thread of CHP using low band.

VHF mutual aid and tactical channels are unlikely to be replaced by systems like CRIS. Why? Most emergency communications at major fires and emergencies are short range simplex. A statewide interoperability system has no role in those types of incidents.

Again, NO the CHP is not moving from low band.
 

es93546

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We are off the thread of CHP using low band.

VHF mutual aid and tactical channels are unlikely to be replaced by systems like CRIS. Why? Most emergency communications at major fires and emergencies are short range simplex. A statewide interoperability system has no role in those types of incidents.

Again, NO the CHP is not moving from low band.
Wildland fire and land management agencies are unlikely to make any changes for a very long time. VHF High is the best band for areas with topography. VHF Low worked very well too, but antenna length and skip reduces its effectiveness. Rural counties with significant topography have been using VHF High for a long time and don't foresee changing to 700/800 systems as it requires far more repeater sites, some studies in relatively mild topography show that four times as many repeaters have to be installed. VHF High is used for wildland fire in nearly every state, it is at the core of wildland fire mutual aid.

By the way, in rural areas it might not be possible to add the additional repeaters to make a 700/800 system work. There are environmental, power grid, and access issues, just to name a few.
 
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