Chrome O/S

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frazpo

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They are applications. They do not run in a browser.

Woops, reread your post. If it will run windows I guess it will.
I thought you meant Chrome browser.
 

moonbounce

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So a Chrome notebook should be capable of handling any SDR Sharp and DSD versions. If so would a Chrome notebook be able to run them at the same time.
 

br0adband

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Ok, for clarification there are three things related to Chrome to be aware of:

1) Chrome the browser used on multiple operating systems and smartphones as well
2) Chromebooks meaning laptops that are powered by ChromeOS which is an operating system by Google but manufactured by companies like Acer, Samsung, etc
3) Chromebook laptops that are actual laptops with Intel mobile processors like a Core i3/i5/i7 and commonly known as the Chromebook Pixel (no longer sold on the market) - the Chromebook Pixel was manufactured by Google itself (just as the original Chromebook, the Google CR-48, was back in 2010-ish)

While it is indeed possible to get Windows installed on the Chromebook Pixel, most people that have one tend to either just continue using the stock OS which is ChromeOS or they might go so far as to install a Linux distribution.

Now after all that the answer is that SDR# and DSD+ are Windows-based applications (DSD+ is a Win32 console app, technically) and they will not run on a Chromebook powered by ChromeOS but they could potentially work on a Chromebook Pixel laptop if it's running Windows.

Confusing? Yep. ;)
 

moonbounce

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Ok, for clarification there are three things related to Chrome to be aware of:

1) Chrome the browser used on multiple operating systems and smartphones as well
2) Chromebooks meaning laptops that are powered by ChromeOS which is an operating system by Google but manufactured by companies like Acer, Samsung, etc
3) Chromebook laptops that are actual laptops with Intel mobile processors like a Core i3/i5/i7 and commonly known as the Chromebook Pixel (no longer sold on the market) - the Chromebook Pixel was manufactured by Google itself (just as the original Chromebook, the Google CR-48, was back in 2010-ish)

While it is indeed possible to get Windows installed on the Chromebook Pixel, most people that have one tend to either just continue using the stock OS which is ChromeOS or they might go so far as to install a Linux distribution.

Now after all that the answer is that SDR# and DSD+ are Windows-based applications (DSD+ is a Win32 console app, technically) and they will not run on a Chromebook powered by ChromeOS but they could potentially work on a Chromebook Pixel laptop if it's running Windows.

Confusing? Yep. ;)
Thanks Broadband that is exactly what I needed to know. And yes it was confusing but I certainly have a better handle on it now.

MB
 
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