Coax cable through aluminum window sash?

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novice1234

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Can I run a coax cable through a drilled 4 inch aluminum window frame without problems in order to get to an outside antenna? Few options. Thanks.
 

methusaleh

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You may not have to drill if you use a pass through jumper.

Comet CTC-50M Feed Through CTC50M
For a scanner, that should be fine. I use two of the predecessors to that product for scanner purposes only and they have been in place for years. However for amateur use, that tiny jumper doesn't inspire confidence in me as far as power goes. I ran my coax as I believe the OP is considering. I drilled down from the edge of the window frame slightly, then rounded out the hole with a hand file until my coax fit snugly. Ran the coax, put up my antenna, and finally sealed the hole with some expandable spray foam around each side. I finished that off by sanding it down to look clean, and that setup has worked for me for the past four years.

Each window will be different, however.

Good luck!
 

jonwienke

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For TX, I would NOT use the jumper. I would use something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/MPD-Digital-DP-YJHA-7K4X-Connector-Dielectric/dp/B015RU1QO6

They are available in different lengths, Get one about 1-1/2 inches longer than the thickness of the window or whatever you're going through. Makes it a lot easier to change out coax without re-sealing the passthrough, You just have to reseal the exterior connector.
 

novice1234

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Is it a dumb idea to simply drill a hole through the aluminum sash (just a few mm's thick) and run the cable through a piece of rubber hose? Will be using double shielded coax and an antenna tuner. Thanks for all replies and good ideas.
 

jonwienke

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Keep in mind that most flavors of hose are not rated for long-term UV exposure, and the rubber will eventually dry out and crumble, leaving your coax susceptible to damage from the aluminum.

Also a bulkhead connector makes it easy to replace the outdoor coax (which will need to be done more frequently than the indoor coax) without disturbing the indoor coax.
 

SCPD

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That's basically what I did, although I got my inspiration from a window feed-thru marketed by MFJ.

MFJ Enterprises Inc.

Here is my panel with the coax connected...

I have used that at a town house that had no other way for the coax to get in. I did add a couple of F-connectors for the fm & tv antennas. Since I have moved to a normal house, I can run the coax cables through a PVC pipe through the wall in the radio room. It is still works great going on now for over 10 years with no problems. Did a second one for future lines, first one is weather sealed and no air comes in. The other one is capped until this spring when more antennas go up. At the time the MFJ for the town house was an easy option which worked for me but the other ideas especially the bulkheads mentioned above are another great option. I probable could have fabricated one like the MFJ one, but never had the time to do it.
 

novice1234

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Would multiple PVC holes work better if one is running through several radio and electronic applications? I'd like to run a ham, CB, a SW random length wire, and a weather monitor cable through the window. I think the aluminum frame could handle it, as against going through the smaller wood frame and thus hurting the window's structural integrity. It is a big window. I worry about several wires so close together going through one PVC hole on the aluminum frame and induction problems. Not that I'd use them at once except for the weather monitor. Thanks.
 

jim202

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Getting cables into a home to the operating position is always a task. The first hurdle to overcome is who owns the house and how much can you do without getting thrown out.

I have been around the country and lived in a number of different places. Some I have owned and others was a rental. The rentals can be a major hurdle as your not able to drill holes. So these places will generally limit you to making some sort of entry through a window and make a pass through panel of some sort.

I do not like to see any holes drilled into an aluminum window frame. It is hard to patch up and can cause failure of the window down the road. Plus water entry can be difficult to control. This entry method would be my last choice. Movement of the cables will cut through your cable jacket. A feed through adapter would be the best choice if you go this route. But again, it would be my absolute last choice to use.

Wood is a good material as it is easy to work with and easy to obtain. Most windows go up and down. So opening the window and putting the piece of wood at the bottom is simple. Some foam is used to seal the window at the top to keep out the bugs, wind and rain. Just be careful on how much pressure you put on the glass so you don't crack it.

A piece of wood at the top to keep the window from being opened will secure it. Go from the top of the window section you raised up to the top of the window frame. It can be at a slight angle with pressure to prevent the window from being raised and entry gained by a robber.

if you own the house, entry options depend on how the place is constructed. If your on a house with a true foundation, look at trying to go through the foundation and into the basement or crawl space. then you can go up though the floor or if you can locate where the wall is, you can drill a hole in the sill and come up inside a wall. Then once your in the wall, you can put an electrical box in and bring out the cables through the box.

If you have a slab house, look at making a hole in the overhang (soffit) and into the attic space. Hopefully it's high enough to be able to move around up in the attic and again locate a wall. Then drill a hole in the top wall sill and go down into your radio room. Use the same trick with an electrical box.

The hole you make in the foundation and or the overhang soffit can be sealed up with the use of expanding spray foam. The reason is to keep out the local critters from using your home as their home. Mice are amazing on how small a hole they can crawl through. The local larger gray haired ones that like acorns will like to get into your attic. Once they gain access to your attic, they can cause great damage to just about everything up there including your house electrical wiring.

Hope this gives you some thoughts on how to get your cables into your radio room.
 

k6cpo

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That's basically what I did, although I got my inspiration from a window feed-thru marketed by MFJ.
Here is my panel with the coax connected...
Nice job Sir.
Thank you.

I have used that at a town house that had no other way for the coax to get in. I did add a couple of F-connectors for the fm & tv antennas. Since I have moved to a normal house, I can run the coax cables through a PVC pipe through the wall in the radio room. It is still works great going on now for over 10 years with no problems. Did a second one for future lines, first one is weather sealed and no air comes in. The other one is capped until this spring when more antennas go up. At the time the MFJ for the town house was an easy option which worked for me but the other ideas especially the bulkheads mentioned above are another great option. I probable could have fabricated one like the MFJ one, but never had the time to do it.
This house doesn't belong to me, although I have more latitude than the average renter because the house is owned by my wife's mother. However, drilling holes in the wall was not an option. One thing I did have to do was place a board in the window track to prevent the window from being opened fully.

Is your window crooked? Or it is the trim?
It's a 1920's vintage house and has settled over the years. There's not a plumb wall, square corner or level floor in the entire house, so, yeah, it's probably crooked. I can put a can of beer on the floor in front of the refrigerator and it will roll to the other end of the kitchen unaided...
 

cmdrwill

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k6cpo "It's a 1920's vintage house and has settled over the years. There's not a plumb wall, square corner or level floor in the entire house, so, yeah, it's probably crooked. I can put a can of beer on the floor in front of the refrigerator and it will roll to the other end of the kitchen unaided..."

That should make one stop drinking!

I have over the years lived in some places that may well qualify as yours does.
 
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