codes for vhf-air scanning

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hfflunki

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Hi,
i have a home patrol and
i've been monitoring the local air bands
and am curios if you can find the expanation
of the number sequances they tell flight controll
and visaversa thanks
im new to this hobby so any help would be appreciated
 

kcoleman

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Example?

Do you have an example of what you are hearing?

My guess is you are hearing directions passed between controller and pilot related to altitude, course heading, maybe aircraft speed, runway numbers or the next frequency for the pilot to switch to.

As Gator points out there are resources on the web to also help you out.

Good Luck,
Keith
 

hfflunki

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They are 3 digit numbers like 330 or 340 ect.. the altitude i can usuly figure out
but i didnt know if they were runway or some kind of code or verbal shorthand
thanks again gator596 for link it helped alot
thanks for newbi help
dan
 

kcoleman

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They are 3 digit numbers like 330 or 340 ect.. the altitude i can usuly figure out...
This may very well be course headings that you are hearing. Looking at the compass rose below; North would be 0/360 degrees, then if the plane is taking a 330 heading he is flying North West from his current position.

Hope that helps,
Keith
 

hfflunki

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ya,
thanks for the google term i searched it and found a north atlantic flight manual in pdf
i guess its this
FLIGHT LEVEL (FL)
A surface of constant atmospheric pressure which is related to a specific pressure datum, (i.e., Standard
Pressure- 29.92' a Hg or 1013 HP), and is separated from other such surfaces by specific pressure intervals.
Each is stated in three digits that represent hundreds of feet, (i.e., FL060 = 6000 feet).
thanks again to everone for the help
 

majoco

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Yo ain't gonna hear FL060! Depending on the administration and the anticipated terrain clearances, there is a 'transition altitude" - here it's 13,000feet. Below 13,000 aircraft fly with their altimeters set to the local pressure (QNH) in "millibars" or "inches" and on ascent through 13,000 all aircraft set their altimeters to 1013mB or 29.92inches. On descent through FL150 you set your altimeter back to the local QNH - nobody is allowed to stay in level flight at FL140.
 

nanZor

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ya,
thanks for the google term i searched it and found a north atlantic flight manual in pdf
i guess its this
FLIGHT LEVEL (FL)....
A nice explanation about this can be found here in the paragraph about Altitude:
http://www.freqofnature.com/aviation/index.html

It tells why the zeros get dropped, and why the term flight-level is used once you get above 17,500 feet. Note that this link is somewhat southern-California specific, but a lot of it is applicable to other areas..
 
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AirScan

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Yo ain't gonna hear FL060!
Some areas of the world have transition altitudes below 6000 feet. Aruba in the Netherland Antilles is one example, the transition LEVEL is FL040 and the transition ALTITUDE is 2500 feet. If you listen to the Aruba LiveATC feed you will hear FL060 being used.
 
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