Colorado Codes and Terms list ?

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dw2872

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That means the driver has his drivers license revoked for him bring a Habitual Traffic Offender (HTO). Each jurisdiction has their own lingo, codes, and lists. Although HTO is a common one. If a person is driving while revoked HTO, that is a felony in Colorado.
 
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dw2872

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My Northern Colorado list is about 15 pages long. Just PM your email address to me and I can send it.

It has CSP lingo such as "55, 95" which means they just completed a roadside DUI test and now they are taking someone in custody for it. It is short for 10-55 (DUI confirmed through roadside test) and 10-95 (in custody). EtOH, shorthand for Ethanol aka Ethyl Alcohol (drinking alcohol). And lots more.

Or you could just ask what each term means on here.
 

dw2872

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By the way, anyone know what Code-99 means when Medevac uses it here? It sounds like it is that they are at a location but don't know if that means back at the pad or on scene somewhere.
 

ecanderson

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Agreed. All over the map. For example, Longmont wouldn't say 10-7, they'd say Code 7. And they use a suffix at times. For example, a "Code 9 Frank" means there's a felony warrant found for the person in question. Not to be confused with just a "Code Frank", which is what you want at the end of a traffic stop (a warning). Here's what I know of theirs, BTW. Got theirs from a list a while back, and it seems to be holding true:

Code 0 Use caution
Code 1 Arrival
Code 2 In contact with car or person
Code 3 Incident traffic only on this channel
Code 4 Unit is OK (and on site as anticipated)
Code 5 In custody
Code 6 Mental Subject or U.I.
Code 7 Meal break
Code 8 In service
Code 9 Wanted person/stolen property
Code 9 MARY Misdemeanor warrant
Code 9 FRANK Felony warrant
Code 9 GEORGE Gang affiliation
Code 9 IDA Sensitive information (or officer info.)
Code 10 Emergency request for cover unit
Code 11 Routine request for cover unit

ADAM Unable to locate or GOA
BOY Unfounded
CHARLES Civil problem or situation
DAVID General assistance provided
EDWARD Referred to another agency
FRANK Warning given
GEORGE Report taken
HENRY Arrest made
IDA Follow up

JOHN ALARM - Working on alarm
KING ALARM - Employee error
LINCOLN ALARM - Equipment
MARY ALARM - Intentional
NORA ALARM - Valid
OCEAN ALARM - Power outage
PAUL ALARM - Unknown
QUEEN ALARM - Weather

ROBERT Needs follow-up or re-contact
SAM Summons issued
TOM Car alarm
UNION Utilities
X-RAY Canceled
YOUNG Handled by communications
 

dw2872

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For example, a "Code 9 Frank" means there's a felony warrant found for the person in question. Not to be confused with just a "Code Frank", which is what you want at the end of a traffic stop (a warning).
I certainly wouldn't want State Patrol to use "Code Frank" for anything to do with me or a traffic stop on me. For them it means "Fatality" (usually from a traffic accident).
 

dw2872

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Code 6 Mental Subject or U.I.
I also find it hilarious that Longmont uses Code-6 to mean "Mental Subject".

Can you imagine a Longmont officer hearing Denver or Aurora officers saying, "I'm Code-6"?

For DPD and APD that means they arrived on scene.
 

dw2872

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This thread is a great illustration how almost nobody (even departments in the same region) uses the standard codes. Everyone has their own unique codes or an adaptation of some sort. It is just as bad as trying to keep up with the disjointed and separate radio systems in the Denver metro area (while the rest of the state is generally on-board with DTRS).

Is Denver PD the only department that uses Code-10 to mean emergent instead of using Code-3 and Code-9 to mean non-emergent instead of Code-2?
 
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ecanderson

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I certainly wouldn't want State Patrol to use "Code Frank" for anything to do with me or a traffic stop on me. For them it means "Fatality" (usually from a traffic accident).
Interesting. Commonly, you hear "Code Black" for that around here in the north. I had thought I'd heard CSP use that expression, too.
 

dw2872

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I've definitely heard CSP use code Frank on their channels in Weld and a few other counties.

The non CSP agencies (especially FD and EMS but also some law) do use the Triage Medical Terms of black, red, yellow, and green.
 

dw2872

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Interesting. Commonly, you hear "Code Black" for that around here in the north. I had thought I'd heard CSP use that expression, too.
In Colorado Springs they also use "Code-A" to mean an obvious death from unnatural causes and DOA or unattended death for the natural ones.


For CSP, they use "Code Frank" statewide but when they are repeating what they heard from S.O. or Fire to the dispatcher they do sometimes say "Code Black" because that is what was said on the county TGs.

I am sure there are many examples of CSP saying "Code Black" due to them repeating the county comms traffic over to the CSP dispatcher. But here are just a couple times they said "Code Frank" from 2 days of traffic deaths in Larimer County. Strange they were both named Joshua...

---

Joshua Ratzlaff, 36, died Dec. 26 when his car collided with an embankment north of Fort Collins.

Article: Man dies after getting ejected from car during rollover north of Fort Collins | 9news.com

CSP Dispatch Audio: https://www.dropbox.com/s/c8gce5vdqt6159k/Dec 26 2013 at 11-50pm - Joshua Ratzlaff - age 36 - US Hwy 287 - Black 1995 Honda Accord.mp3

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Joshua Hite-Touchet, 21, died Dec. 27 after being thrown from a pickup being driven by his father, John Hite, who CSP said was drunk and speeding on Larimer County Road 38 west of Fort Collins by Horsetooth Reservoir.

Article: http://www.coloradoan.com/article/20131227/NEWS01/312270046/Just-freed-from-jail-Fort-Collins-driver-arrested-DUI-charges-following-fatal-crash

CSP Dispatch Audio: https://www.dropbox.com/s/2iuqcramyzf6g82/Dec 27 2013 at 12-30am - Joshua Hite-Touchet age 21 - Horsetooth Reservoir - 2005 Chevy Silverado.mp3
 

dw2872

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Excellent addition to the list!

Yes, they use "COR-0", but that only means no heartbeat (and maybe not breathing). They can still be saved. Aurora FD/EMS saved 20 people that were initially COR-0 in 2010 and they saved 15 people that were COR-0 in 2011.

Code Black, Code "Frank", Code Adam, etc are confirmed fatalities.

Anyone know where the COR abbreviation comes from?
 
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Suavechef

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Thanks for that information. Although I have never heard any Aurora unit say they have had a black patient when I listen. The one time I did hear black used was when I listened to the theater shooting replay that was posted and that could have been a mutual aid office reporting that.

My brother is dating an Aurora 911 dispatcher so I can ask. Not sure she would know for sure though. I asked her what and IVR was when officers were asking for services for an tow. They would say that they needed and IVR Tow. Let me ask though and see what I get.
 

dw2872

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IVR sounds like a tow for impound (or "the pound" as they like to say). Impound vehicle request maybe.
 

edftc

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"Core-0" , Cor is a phonetic way for the French for heart: Couer -pronounced "Coor", and Spanish word or the first part of "Corazon" - heart, probably has Latin (medical) roots.
 

dw2872

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"Core-0" , Cor is a phonetic way for the French for heart: Couer -pronounced "Coor", and Spanish word or the first part of "Corazon" - heart, probably has Latin (medical) roots.
As a matter of fact "Cor" is the Latin word for heart. And COR-0 is mentioned in Aurora FD's annual reports, specifically as "COR-0" not Core-0. But I don't think they are using Latin or any other foreign language. ;)

AFD 2010 Annual Report
https://www.auroragov.org/cs/groups/public/documents/digitalmedia/00****.pdf

AFD 2011 Annual Report
https://www.auroragov.org/cs/groups/public/documents/digitalmedia/012895.pdf
 
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