Comments Requested on Interim Rule Banning U.S. Federal Agencies from Buying Chinese Equipment

N1GAW

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The U.S. government is accepting comment on draft rule that would ban federal agencies from buying telecommunications and video surveillance equipment from five Chinese companies, including Hytera Communications and Huawei.

 

ElroyJetson

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Make the ban permanent. The Chinese can be trusted to act only in their own self interest. I trust no Chinese electronic product to be free of spyware. They are ethically a complete zero as well, copying the intellectual property of others without a care. As far as I'm concerned the rest of the world should slap a total embargo on all trade with China until its communist government is dead to the last man, and replaced with a democratically elected government of representatives, which operates according to sound ethical and legal principles.
 

hitechRadio

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They are a Chinese company, and potentially a victim of the trade war.
Trade war may have helped, but this has been talked about being security concern for some time. Nice to see them taking action on this finally.
Sorry Hytera,,,your governments dubious deeds screwed you!
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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Trade war may have helped, but this has been talked about being security concern for some time. Nice to see them taking action on this finally.
Sorry Hytera,,,your governments dubious deeds screwed you!
Before we start throwing any more stones at the Chinese, keep in mind:

1: Hytera Communications and Huawei are competing with some of the big names in Telecom in US such as Motorola, Harris, Arista Networks, Apple, and Cisco. While there may be some legitimate patent issues between Hytera and Motorola, Motorola fears that Hytera will bury them. They might, because Hytera quality is very good and they are innovated Hytera means HYT ERA as opposed to Motorola ERA.

2. US NSA has intercepted shipments of Routers from CISCO and implanted malware in them to spy on enemies and allies alike. NSA has planted back doors in many products by US and foreign manufacturers, Using the logic presented that the Chinese should be feared, likelwise the US should be feared.

3. Motorola has long been freindly with US Govt and has engineered spy craft devices for decades.

4. This is all about the money folks.
 

Technoguy58

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I can't prove it, but as far as I'm concerned, we are going to regret trying to deal with the Chinese as they stand now. Very unethical. Steal intellectual property rights from everyone. I feel quite sure that there is built in backdoors on every phone and computer they make. I do not trust them with my dog .(They'd probably eat him). Look at how they poisoned people animals with contaminated pet food.
 

Technoguy58

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What is wrong with us spying on other governments? Every government has to look out for it's own interest. But, we don't need to knowingly let other governments spy on us and that is what they do. We are not children here.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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What is wrong with us spying on other governments? Every government has to look out for it's own interest. But, we don't need to knowingly let other governments spy on us and that is what they do. We are not children here.
I just asked my Chinese freind the same question and he had same answer as you! Who would have thought!
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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I can't prove it, but as far as I'm concerned, we are going to regret trying to deal with the Chinese as they stand now. Very unethical. Steal intellectual property rights from everyone. I feel quite sure that there is built in backdoors on every phone and computer they make. I do not trust them with my dog .(They'd probably eat him). Look at how they poisoned people animals with contaminated pet food.
In about 1980, Japan had already in place a national cellular radio system. I was working for Motorola at the time. The Japanese had trade restrictions that permitted only phones made by Japanese firms to operate on their system. Motorola wanted a peice of that business and was busy lobbying the US Govt to wrangle a slice of the action for them. But Japan would not reveal any of the design specifications for the phones that were used on the system. A couple engineers from Motorola were sent to Tokyo for a "holiday". They brought with them receivers and data protocal analysers. They rented a limo with a phone and paid the driver to take them all around the hot tourist spots. He did not realize they were using the phone on the limo to collect hand off and system information. Motorola "spied" on the Japanese telecom industry.

Since we are not children. Remember YOUR OWN GOVT and US CORPORATIONS are SPYING ON YOU RIGHT NOW. Plenty of contaminated pet and people food on the shelves right now from US corporations.

Don't be further brainwashed by US..
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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I can't prove it, but as far as I'm concerned, we are going to regret trying to deal with the Chinese as they stand now. Very unethical. Steal intellectual property rights from everyone. I feel quite sure that there is built in backdoors on every phone and computer they make. I do not trust them with my dog .(They'd probably eat him). Look at how they poisoned people animals with contaminated pet food.
A tale of contaminated US manufactured pet food, theft and lying.

 

hitechRadio

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Before we start throwing any more stones at the Chinese, keep in mind:

1: Hytera Communications and Huawei are competing with some of the big names in Telecom in US such as Motorola, Harris, Arista Networks, Apple, and Cisco. While there may be some legitimate patent issues between Hytera and Motorola, Motorola fears that Hytera will bury them. They might, because Hytera quality is very good and they are innovated Hytera means HYT ERA as opposed to Motorola ERA.

2. US NSA has intercepted shipments of Routers from CISCO and implanted malware in them to spy on enemies and allies alike. NSA has planted back doors in many products by US and foreign manufacturers, Using the logic presented that the Chinese should be feared, likelwise the US should be feared.

3. Motorola has long been freindly with US Govt and has engineered spy craft devices for decades.

4. This is all about the money folks.
About Money??..Yes it is, but not in the way your getting at. Companies have lost millions because of the Chinese from stolen IP, technologies.

Hell, they steal from the littlest of companies, that do not have the big money like Motorola and others have.


The Chinese have never played well with the rest of the world, from stealing licensed technologies, to spyware... it does not end.
I agree Moto is surely happy of the news. Especially after settling there lawsuit with Hytera.
Probably won't impact them a whole lot as the Feds do not use a lot of Hytera for critical comms anyway.

Huawei has a long track record in intellectual property theft. In 2004 Cisco Systems, the market leader in routers, took Huawei to court for stealing its core router software code and using it in Huawei routers. The case was settled confidentially. More recently, when Huawei public statements claimed that the 2004 case did not involve stolen Cisco code, Cisco in 2012 replied by describing the essence of their original complaint this way: “this litigation involved allegations by Cisco of direct, verbatim copying of our source code, to say nothing of our command line interface, our help screens, our copyrighted manuals and other elements of our products.” Routers are the core hardware technology at the heart of the Internet. Huawei routers, widely used in China and Europe, have played a key role in Huawei’s growth into a $95 billion global telecom equipment giant.

On February 28, 2007, a Motorola engineer named Hanjuan Jin was stopped by customs agents at O’Hare Airport. They searched her and found she had $30,000 in cash, a carry-on bag full of Motorola documents marked “confidential and proprietary,” and a one-way ticket for Beijing. She was arrested.

Jin was a successful engineer working on Motorola’s cellular technology at a time when Motorola was one of the world’s top wireless companies (and a substantial supplier to the Pentagon). Investigations revealed that after eight years with Motorola, Jin had in 2006 taken medical leave, gone to China, and in violation of the terms of her Motorola employment, pursued a job with Sun Kaisens, a Chinese telecom company that does work for the Chinese military. In 2007, she returned to Chicago and resumed work briefly for Motorola, during which time she was seen leaving the office with shopping bags full of documents in the evenings. Born in China, Jin had gone to the US where she received a master’s degree in physics from Notre Dame, and obtained US citizenship.

In 2012, she was sentenced to four years in prison and a fine of $20,000. At the trial, the judge said: “The most important thing this country can do is protect its trade secrets.”

It is a good idea for them to protect our national security from possible spyware, and so far the Chinese do not have a good track record.


"Before we start throwing any more stones at the Chinese"
Nah... the Chinese deserve the stones they are getting!!
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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About Money??..Yes it is, but not in the way your getting at. Companies have lost millions because of the Chinese from stolen IP, technologies.

Hell, they steal from the littlest of companies, that do not have the big money like Motorola and others have.


The Chinese have never played well with the rest of the world, from stealing licensed technologies, to spyware... it does not end.
I agree Moto is surely happy of the news. Especially after settling there lawsuit with Hytera.
Probably won't impact them a whole lot as the Feds do not use a lot of Hytera for critical comms anyway.

Huawei has a long track record in intellectual property theft. In 2004 Cisco Systems, the market leader in routers, took Huawei to court for stealing its core router software code and using it in Huawei routers. The case was settled confidentially. More recently, when Huawei public statements claimed that the 2004 case did not involve stolen Cisco code, Cisco in 2012 replied by describing the essence of their original complaint this way: “this litigation involved allegations by Cisco of direct, verbatim copying of our source code, to say nothing of our command line interface, our help screens, our copyrighted manuals and other elements of our products.” Routers are the core hardware technology at the heart of the Internet. Huawei routers, widely used in China and Europe, have played a key role in Huawei’s growth into a $95 billion global telecom equipment giant.

On February 28, 2007, a Motorola engineer named Hanjuan Jin was stopped by customs agents at O’Hare Airport. They searched her and found she had $30,000 in cash, a carry-on bag full of Motorola documents marked “confidential and proprietary,” and a one-way ticket for Beijing. She was arrested.

Jin was a successful engineer working on Motorola’s cellular technology at a time when Motorola was one of the world’s top wireless companies (and a substantial supplier to the Pentagon). Investigations revealed that after eight years with Motorola, Jin had in 2006 taken medical leave, gone to China, and in violation of the terms of her Motorola employment, pursued a job with Sun Kaisens, a Chinese telecom company that does work for the Chinese military. In 2007, she returned to Chicago and resumed work briefly for Motorola, during which time she was seen leaving the office with shopping bags full of documents in the evenings. Born in China, Jin had gone to the US where she received a master’s degree in physics from Notre Dame, and obtained US citizenship.

In 2012, she was sentenced to four years in prison and a fine of $20,000. At the trial, the judge said: “The most important thing this country can do is protect its trade secrets.”

It is a good idea for them to protect our national security from possible spyware, and so far the Chinese do not have a good track record.


"Before we start throwing any more stones at the Chinese"
Nah... the Chinese deserve the stones they are getting!!
Maybe so. But we have met the enemy and it is US Corporations (with US Govt's approval).

In every case, you will find that these Chinese engineers are here in the US on a valid student or H1B VISA. Corporations have been very happy hiring foreign IT workers in preference to US IT workers. The reason? The Chinese are "smarter and work cheaper".

It is a problem US Corporations have created themselves. When you go to Walmart, try buying a US made product versus Chinese. You wont find very much, unless maybe in the gun department.

Buy yourself an Apple phone. Where is it made? China. If you find a US made product and crack it open, chances are the stuff inside came from China.

My point is, I fail to see the Moral High road in disparaging the Chinese when our US Corps and Govt, created and permitted all this from the start. I remember back in the 90's the big buzz word was "Technology Transfer" as if it was some two way street. It was not. It was US Corporations worried about how to make the most bucks in the next 90 days, not how they would survive long term.

Look at Motorola Mobility. Motorola spun that off with all the patents to Google, they sold it to Lenovo. Now the Chinese have all that IP.

So indeed we are fxxx'd, why? The reason? The Chinese are "smarter and work cheaper".

So its like the guy who goes to Vegas and marries a cheap stripper and after the honeymoon, finds she is sleeping with his buddies. Not feeling the empathy for US Corps.


tech·nol·o·gy trans·fer
noun
noun: technology transfer
  1. the transfer of new technology from the originator to a secondary user, especially from developed to less developed countries in an attempt to boost their economies.
 
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prcguy

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On the other hand, when I worked for Hughes Aircraft on a mil radio type project and could see our design was a bit lacking at the time, I brought in one of my manuals and schematics for a Motorola military radio to share typical design ideas and my management told me to get that manual out of the lab and to never bring in anything like that again. They did not want to have anyone be able to point a finger at Hughes for even thinking about Hughes copying an idea from another company.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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On the other hand, when I worked for Hughes Aircraft on a mil radio type project and could see our design was a bit lacking at the time, I brought in one of my manuals and schematics for a Motorola military radio to share typical design ideas and my management told me to get that manual out of the lab and to never bring in anything like that again. They did not want to have anyone be able to point a finger at Hughes for even thinking about Hughes copying an idea from another company.
I worked in a mobile lab at Motorola and we took apart mobiles from Bosch and others to see how they worked.
I should add, a fair amount of Motorola's competitors used Motorola's IC's and transistors in their radios. So at the time Motorola was in good shape to have competition. Then they decided to cash out the Semiconductor group to others forfeiting IP rights, revenue, R&D resources( Fab labs) and having to buy those parts on the market instead of with "blue money".
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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The U.S. government is accepting comment on draft rule that would ban federal agencies from buying telecommunications and video surveillance equipment from five Chinese companies, including Hytera Communications and Huawei.

74345
 

flythunderbird

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The U.S. government is accepting comment on draft rule that would ban federal agencies from buying telecommunications and video surveillance equipment from five Chinese companies, including Hytera Communications and Huawei.
I work in US government contracting. We were notified today that the rule is in effect, and we are required to include the Federal Acquisition Regulation clauses 52.204 and 52.205 in all solicitations and contracts (even those not for this equipment) going forward.

For anyone who is interested, here's the language requiring that 52.204 and 52.205 be added: FAR 4.2105
 
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