Communications Receiver 'Full spectrum' covered - antennas selection plan

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OK2BCK

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Aug 12, 2008
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New Zealand, Napier
Dear enthusiasts, long story short:
How to get satisfactory results covering spectrum 100kHz - 2GHz using maximum of 5 antennas?

I realise that there will be great loss on big ranges of frequencies in between 'tuned' lengths of antennas but my goal is to have a good gain on all the 'interesting' wavelengths.

The receiver is ready to tune almost any frequency - why not to make it 'well received'.

Have a good day!

Jan
 

k9rzz

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Joined
Dec 12, 2005
Messages
3,164
Location
Milwaukee, WI
Dear enthusiasts, long story short:
How to get satisfactory results covering spectrum 100kHz - 2GHz using maximum of 5 antennas?

I realise that there will be great loss on big ranges of frequencies in between 'tuned' lengths of antennas but my goal is to have a good gain on all the 'interesting' wavelengths.

The receiver is ready to tune almost any frequency - why not to make it 'well received'.

Have a good day!

Jan
I would break it down:

100 - 500khz
Requirements - low noise. Suggestions - long wire, loops (active or passive), EWE. The noise on this band can kill your reception. Regular wires tend to pick up TV and computer noise. EWEs or various loops work best. Wonderful DX has been logged by many using small, efficient loops. A BCB filter may help also.

500 - 1700khz
Requirements - medium gain. Suggestions - long wire, loops (active or passive). Loops work great so you can null 'pest' stations. Tunable loops help peak one end of the band, while reducing local stations on the other end. Long wires layed on the ground work well here.

1700khz - 30mhz
Requirements - decent height. Suggestions - long wire, verticals. The longer the better, get it up as high as you can. A tuner is recommended to maximize reception. Open wire feeders with a tuner cover this broad band rather well (better than coax).

30 - 400mhz
Requirements - decent height, low loss cable. Suggestions - log periodic, discone. Use low loss feedline, get it up clear of trees and buildings.

400mhz - 2Ghz
Requirements - decent height, very low loss cable. Suggestions - Suggestions - log periodic, discone. Try to get it clear of obstacles, use the best cable you can afford. Feedline loss is the killer here.

Hope that helps.
 
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prcguy

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Jun 30, 2006
Messages
10,560
Location
So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
A good active antenna can fill the 10KHz to 30MHz region easily. I have an "AMRAD" active whip, which is a semi kit but I believe someone is offering these fully assembled. This antenna was designed for VLF DXing in the presence of nearby strong AM broadcast and LORAN transmitters, its basically a bullet proof active antenna through 30MHz. With an AMRAD and a 102ft long G5RV at the same height, sometimes the AMRAD has a slight edge and sometimes the G5RV has the edge on picking out the very weak signals in the general HF range. In the VLF range the AMRAD is in a class by itself. Check here for the ARRL article: http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/pdf/0109031.pdf
and here for updates since the ARRL article:http://www.amrad.org/projects/lf/actant/
prcguy
 

OK2BCK

Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2008
Messages
90
Location
New Zealand, Napier
I would break it down:

100 - 500khz
Requirements - low noise. Suggestions - long wire, loops (active or passive), EWE. The noise on this band can kill your reception. Regular wires tend to pick up TV and computer noise. EWEs or various loops work best. Wonderful DX has been logged by many using small, efficient loops. A BCB filter may help also.

500 - 1700khz
Requirements - medium gain. Suggestions - long wire, loops (active or passive). Loops work great so you can null 'pest' stations. Tunable loops help peak one end of the band, while reducing local stations on the other end. Long wires layed on the ground work well here.

1700khz - 30mhz
Requirements - decent height. Suggestions - long wire, verticals. The longer the better, get it up as high as you can. A tuner is recommended to maximize reception. Open wire feeders with a tuner cover this broad band rather well (better than coax).

30 - 400mhz
Requirements - decent height, low loss cable. Suggestions - log periodic, discone. Use low loss feedline, get it up clear of trees and buildings.

400mhz - 2Ghz
Requirements - decent height, very low loss cable. Suggestions - Suggestions - log periodic, discone. Try to get it clear of obstacles, use the best cable you can afford. Feedline loss is the killer here.

Hope that helps.
Wonderful start here k9rzz, that is what I was after!
Now let's get closer to particular antennas, prcguy I very appreciate your one!
 
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