Cornwall ON Police Dump Digital (For Now)

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Jan 3, 2004
Messages
103
Location
Eastern Ontario
The article below appeared in the local newspaper last Friday, October 21, 2005.
I can confirm that, as of yesterday, Friday, October 28, they are indeed back on
good old analog FM. I'm hoping that their new $1,000,000 digital Motorola system,
expected in March 2006 will also be APCO P-25. Otherwise my shiny new digital
PRO-2096 will only be useful for Bell Fleetnet. Anyway, here's the story:

---
STANDARD-FREEHOLDER LOCAL - NEWS FROM ACROSS S, D AND G
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2005, P3

Police Dumping Trial Radio System

By Kevin Lajoie
Standard-Freeholder
Cornwall

The Cornwall Community Police Service will be temporarily going back to its analog radio system as it awaits a $1-million digital communications system upgrade.

The police service had spent $50,000 to undertake a six-month trial of a new digital radio system provided by an overseas company, but the service “experienced growing problems” with the new equipment, said Cornwall Police Chief Dan Parkinson.

“There were difficulties from time to time with coverage and the end-user product (the hand held radios),” Parkinson said.

Parkinson said it appeared there were gaps in the capability to communicate with the new equipment, with some communications being “lost” along the way for no apparent reason.

During the test period, the police service also issued a request for a proposal for a new digital system, and the project has been awarded to communications service provider Motorola.

Parkinson said the new system will prevent unwanted interception of police signals, something that will add an extra layer of safety for officers.

The new system will begin to be put in place by the end of the year, Parkinson said, and the new hand-held radios should be in the hands of officers by March.

After 25 years, the analog system was in sad need of replacement, the police chief said.

“This is a large capital investment for us,” he said.

Along with handling police calls, the new system will also dispatch services for the city fire department, which is currently using a private dispatch service.

There’s also the possibility of handling dispatch duties for the fire departments in S, D and G down the road.

The communications room will be staffed by two full-time and four part-time officials.
---
 

IdleMonitor

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 17, 2005
Messages
2,882
Location
The Ottawa Valley - Eastern Ontario
So if they don't go with a 3600 baud digital system (such as like fleetnet) or 9600 baud. (Both of which can be monitored) What else would they go with unless it's simply encrypted?

The only other digtal system would be an EDACS system right? Does motorola do those types?
 

tenninetytwo

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2005
Messages
17
You can say "choice words" were used over the air by officers regarding their new set up. I heard many times going car to car and loosing all transmission. Some of those times were during a back up situation and officers not being able to find out where the other was... It's one thing to have "...difficulties from time to time with coverage and the end-user product" but this was getting those guys in some serious situations.
I haven't heard to much chatter from their other frequencies mostly used by the plain clothes.
 

tenninetytwo

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2005
Messages
17
...they are trying it again...
I'm not well versed in all of this however i can no longer pick them up...any ideas???



New dispatch system shelves scanners


Avid listeners of police scanners will now have to find a new source of entertainment.

City police and firefighters are now responding to service calls through a new $1-million digital communication system, leaving little use for the older, analog-type scanners.

"There goes the Friday and Saturday night entertainment," joked Cornwall Police Chief Dan Parkinson.

The new system, which came into operation Monday and replaced the 25-year-old analog system, will prevent unwanted interception of police signals, something which will add an extra layer of safety for officers.

Cornwall Deputy Fire Chief Rob Hickley said the new system will have a large impact on the fire department since it offers a more comprehensive dispatching service.

The change in systems was seamless and won't have an impact on citizens requiring help, Hickley said.

People facing an emergency should still call 911, and the call will be routed to the appropriate emergency service.

The initial call through the new system will still provide the same details such as the nature and location of the emergency, Hickley said. However, the system will give firefighters access to more information while on scene.

For example, firefighters could get the exact location of a fire hydrant which may be covered by snow in the dead of winter.

It's believed the new communication system could possibly benefit homeowners through reduced home insurance rates, but Hickley said that is something homeowners would have to pursue individually.

"One thing that is looked upon favourably (by insurance officials) is a professional dispatch system," he said.
"It never hurts to ask."

Previously, the fire department used a private dispatch service to handle its calls.

Parkinson said the police service plans on holding an open house later this month to show off the new system.
 

xml

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2006
Messages
15
If there's multiple users... they'll probably trunk all the existing infrastructure. If the budget is right, Motorola is probably pushing a 3600/9600 system... Ø

Just my guess.

Maybe... but probably not... They could be testing MotoTRBO (go TDMA!)
 

imcleish

Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2004
Messages
264
Location
Durham Region and Parry Sound, Ontario
While speculations are happening, maybe the voice comms will be P25 trunk, and the data portion may be like the Toronto EMS Dispatch/AVL/Data system.

The comment regarding finding a firehydrant in the snow makes me think some sort of GPS.

my 2 cents,
 

tenninetytwo

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2005
Messages
17
ok guys, i'm a real newbie with digital. how/what should i be trying or looking for to hear them again. I should say that i can still hear some gargle from their frequencie. It does not sound like inversion. Sound like when the digital card is not correctly tuned (if that makes any sense !)
 

Aviator747

Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2006
Messages
23
Location
Cornwall, ON
Crap, I had a feeling by the sound of that recording that it was. Thanks xml

I was hoping that they would stay unencrypted like their first trial system was.
 

xml

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2006
Messages
15
One could assume if they have encryption in-use now, it will be implemented fully when the new system is brought online.

i.e. If you're buying a scanner to hear them specifically, don't bother, you'll never hear them again.
 

xml

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2006
Messages
15
I stand corrected.

Perhaps those in Cornwall can be like the others who claim they can decrypt voice inversion just by listening... only spice it up a bit = IMBE + DES

:p
 

tenninetytwo

Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2005
Messages
17
here is the latest.....

New dispatch centre could save lives

Wednesday, July 19, 2006 @ 10:00

City police and fire departments are applauding the success of a new $1-million dispatch office.

The digital communication system, which replaced a 25-year-old analog system, is worth every penny, officials said at an open house on Tuesday.

"I sincerely believe that Cornwall is a place where we can all fall asleep at night and feel safer for it," said Mayor Phil Poirier.

Chief of Police Dan Parkinson said not only is the public safer, but police staff are more at ease now that their dispatches cannot be picked up with a scanner.

"We're ever so thankful now that our officers are not intercepted . . . and can move stealthily within the community if they have to," he said.


Cornwall was in dire need of an upgrade, Parkinson said as he held up a long stick just over a metre in length.

"When I came here two and a half years ago, this is what they used to turn on the monitor above the old systems," he said.

As an outsider who had seen more advanced response systems, he said he completely agreed with the plans that began several years ago.

"To me, it was a critical element to have."

Luc Boucher, staff sergeant and project manager for the new dispatch office, said he was only a rookie when the police put in their first analog system more than 25 years ago.

By 1997, he said the force identified the need to go digital.

"The radios were getting old," he said. "They were failing often and getting harder to maintain."

The new system makes communication much faster and allows access to more information in emergency situations.

Boucher said 911 calls are re-directed to this new office which can quickly assess the situation and send both police and firemen to the scene depending on the need.

These dispatchers are also better trained.

"It's a big job and there are a lot of expectations from these people," he said, "so it's important they be properly trained."

Boucher said that it used to take more calls and more precious time to get a proper response.

"There will be lives saved because of this," Boucher said.

The transition from the old system to this merged response centre has been very smooth, added Victor Leroux, chief of the fire department.

"It was long overdue," Leroux said.

When it comes to co-ordinating efforts between police and fire officials, having one dedicated person with information right at their fingertips prevents the hassle of calling two or three people before getting the information and the help needed between both departments, he said.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top