Cos sanders used for mono and repeater???

J_edgerton

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Nov 6, 2014
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So I’m sitting around at work. It’s a slow day. I’m just bouncing around on YouTube, radio reference forums, google, etc... and a wild hair sparked a theory. Therefore I have to ask the experts! Would it be possible or feasible to use two cross band rigs in conjunction with each other to achieve an operational mono band repeater? Would this actually work or would it be a complete failure? For example (let’s use nice round numbers) let’s say I have one dual band rig set on Xband set to receive 145 and retransmit on 445 at low wattage. Then maybe not even half a mile down the road I have another site with yet another cross band rig set to receive 445 and retransmit on 146. Therefore in theory, you could setup a vhf rig with RX 146 TX 145... anyone smelling what I’m stepping in? I know the Xband rigs generally arnt rated for continuous duty cycle but let’s say you run a continuous duty cycle rated RF amplifier... anybody? Would it work?
 

J_edgerton

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Nov 6, 2014
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That is called a split site repeater. It would work better if you used real radios and repeater controllers instead of dual band mobile radios.
That’s exactly what I was thinking. Yea none of the equipment I mentioned is rated for continuous duty but if it was a desperate attempt... it would be a good temporary means. Just a thought. Thank you for your response please share the knowledge!
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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It was done quite often for 10 meter repeaters. It will work fine. The only detriment is that TX and RX paths will not be the same. So you might not hear a repeater you are being received by.
 

J_edgerton

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It was done quite often for 10 meter repeaters. It will work fine. The only detriment is that TX and RX paths will not be the same. So you might not hear a repeater you are being received by.
What exactly to you mean by “The only detriment is that TX and RX paths will not be the same. So you might not hear a repeater you are being received by.”
 

nd5y

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If you are not transmitting and receiving from the same antenna then the transmit and receive coverage areas will be different.

The farther the separation is the less the tx/rx coverage overlaps and the more problems you will have with stations in certain areas being able to hear the repeater but the repeater not being able to hear them and vice versa.
 

jonwienke

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That's unlikely to be an issue unless the antennas are miles apart.
 
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