Couple Questions

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Dmac91

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I've been listening to the Chicago stream for a few days now but I'm becoming more curious as to what some terms mean. I hear '10-11 Robert' and '11-34 Robert' a fair bit for example. Is there a comprehensive list of these 'codes' ? And I assume 'Robert' means received (according to google)

Last question is I hear a weird Morse code everyone in a while. Is that a station identifier?

Cheers
 

werinshades

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I've been listening to the Chicago stream for a few days now but I'm becoming more curious as to what some terms mean. I hear '10-11 Robert' and '11-34 Robert' a fair bit for example. Is there a comprehensive list of these 'codes' ? And I assume 'Robert' means received (according to google)

Last question is I hear a weird Morse code everyone in a while. Is that a station identifier?

Cheers
R-Robert cars in most districts are beat cars at night. Due to scheduling, you'll have 2 of the same beat cars out for an hour or two. So instead of logging them off their PDT (Police Data Terminal) and screwing things up, they just leave them as "R" (Robert cars).

In the 5th District, they've been experimenting with staggered start times, so it's possible you'll hear "Robert" cars out during the day.

Morse code is station identifier.
 

h00sierdaddy

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Lake County, IN
I've been listening to the Chicago stream for a few days now but I'm becoming more curious as to what some terms mean. I hear '10-11 Robert' and '11-34 Robert' a fair bit for example. Is there a comprehensive list of these 'codes' ? And I assume 'Robert' means received (according to google)



Last question is I hear a weird Morse code everyone in a while. Is that a station identifier?



Cheers


CPD is broken out into radio zones. Typically, two districts per zone. What you're hearing are not (usually) traditional '10' codes, but the radio signature/beat car number.

The beat car numbers are pretty straight forward. The first digit (or two digits) indicate what district the car belongs to. The last two digits, are the beat number. Furthermore, each district is broken down into 3 sectors (1,2,3). Each sector has several beats. Each sector has a Sgt/Suoervisor assigned.

For example:
1011= 10th district, Sector 1, beat 1
1010= 10th district, Sector 1 Sgt.

1134 = 11th district, Sector 3, beat 4
1134R "Robert" = 11th district, Sector 3, midnight beat car

122 = 1st district, Sector 2, beat 2
120 = 1st district, Sector 2 Sgt

So, beat cars have their last two numbers as 10s, 20s, or 30s.

Rapid Response cars are 40s and 50s. Again, with their district number preceding. "0" at the end means their the Sergeant. Rapid Response Cars (or whatever they're called this week) are usually fully marked squads, but not assigned to any specific beat, They backup beat cars, take calls that have been holding for awhile, etc. You don't see them take 'paper' too much (which is slang for a report).

Tac Units are the 60s. These are usually plain clothes and/or unmarked cars. Again, district numbers will precede their sixty number.

70's are the 'paddy wagons' or squadrol There is one assigned to each sector (71, 72, 73). Again, district number will precede the unit number (see a pattern here?). If they're not picking up bad girls and boys that have been arrested, they will roll on alarm calls, etc.

80s and 90s can be a variety of things from foot patrols, bike patrols, etc.

The district commander is 99. So, 799 would be the 7th district commander. (the boss).

There are literally, about a hundred additional radio IDs for specialty units. If you search for 'carma Chicago police radio guide' there is a pretty comprehensive list, although it's several years old.

Hope this is clear as mud!


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werinshades

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Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 21, 2002
Messages
3,697
Location
Chicago , IL
CPD is broken out into radio zones. Typically, two districts per zone. What you're hearing are not (usually) traditional '10' codes, but the radio signature/beat car number.

The beat car numbers are pretty straight forward. The first digit (or two digits) indicate what district the car belongs to. The last two digits, are the beat number. Furthermore, each district is broken down into 3 sectors (1,2,3). Each sector has several beats. Each sector has a Sgt/Suoervisor assigned.

For example:
1011= 10th district, Sector 1, beat 1
1010= 10th district, Sector 1 Sgt.

1134 = 11th district, Sector 3, beat 4
1134R "Robert" = 11th district, Sector 3, midnight beat car

122 = 1st district, Sector 2, beat 2
120 = 1st district, Sector 2 Sgt

So, beat cars have their last two numbers as 10s, 20s, or 30s.

Rapid Response cars are 40s and 50s. Again, with their district number preceding. "0" at the end means their the Sergeant. Rapid Response Cars (or whatever they're called this week) are usually fully marked squads, but not assigned to any specific beat, They backup beat cars, take calls that have been holding for awhile, etc. You don't see them take 'paper' too much (which is slang for a report).

Tac Units are the 60s. These are usually plain clothes and/or unmarked cars. Again, district numbers will precede their sixty number.

70's are the 'paddy wagons' or squadrol There is one assigned to each sector (71, 72, 73). Again, district number will precede the unit number (see a pattern here?). If they're not picking up bad girls and boys that have been arrested, they will roll on alarm calls, etc.

80s and 90s can be a variety of things from foot patrols, bike patrols, etc.

The district commander is 99. So, 799 would be the 7th district commander. (the boss).

There are literally, about a hundred additional radio IDs for specialty units. If you search for 'carma Chicago police radio guide' there is a pretty comprehensive list, although it's several years old.

Hope this is clear as mud!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
District Commander ends in 00...The "Executive Officer in Charge" uses the "99" designation..Lieutenants 90 or 91..Tact Lieutenant is "60".

Many changes have taken place and much of the information is probably outdated.
 
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