Database acceptance requirements?

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MaryG

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Please excuse my 'green' tint here, but what criteria is required for callsign/frequency/agency info to be accepted and implanted into the RR database? I ask because I know of at least 3 active (public service) callsigns in my area that is not in the RR database. -Mary
 

ecps92

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I'm sure one of the DB Admin's will chime in as the sun comes up.

However IMHO the main criteria is Actual / Recent Frequency usage, along with PL/DPL/NAC info then what type of use, the FCC info is very optional

Please excuse my 'green' tint here, but what criteria is required for callsign/frequency/agency info to be accepted and implanted into the RR database? I ask because I know of at least 3 active (public service) callsigns in my area that is not in the RR database. -Mary
 

MaryG

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I'm sure one of the DB Admin's will chime in as the sun comes up.

However IMHO the main criteria is Actual / Recent Frequency usage, along with PL/DPL/NAC info then what type of use, the FCC info is very optional
Yea, that's what I'm learning. Problem is....

When a noob such as myself forks over $ to help the site and to access the RR database, assuming it's the most recent and current source,... only to discover (usually much later), that it's missing important freqs/agencies... and consequently, not programmed into one's 'programmable' scanner.

I guess my only recourse is to frequently visit the FCC database, and learn how to manually plug-in individual freqs/agencies to assure that what I have is current. In addition to being forced to 'search' for activity. Kinda defeats the whole idea behind a owning a 'programmable' scanner... digitally tied to a database. eh? Oh well, thanks for enlightenment guys.

-mary
 

mciupa

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Have you considered submitting your findings to the database or is your prerogative to keep them private?
 

thewenk

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Yea, that's what I'm learning. Problem is....

When a noob such as myself forks over $ to help the site and to access the RR database, assuming it's the most recent and current source,... only to discover (usually much later), that it's missing important freqs/agencies... and consequently, not programmed into one's 'programmable' scanner.

I guess my only recourse is to frequently visit the FCC database, and learn how to manually plug-in individual freqs/agencies to assure that what I have is current. In addition to being forced to 'search' for activity. Kinda defeats the whole idea behind a owning a 'programmable' scanner... digitally tied to a database. eh? Oh well, thanks for enlightenment guys.

-mary
Mary,

In geographical areas such as where you are, the number of scanner users may be relatively low and submitals to the database many times can be few and far between. However, the RR database is really dependent on members like you to search out new frequencies and see if they are active and, if so, to identify them and submit them to the database. Unfortunately, in rural areas it is much harder to make it a "plug and play" operation to program your scanner as frequencies listed in the db may limited to only the most well known and highly used.

There are many frequencies in the FCC Database that are listed as active, but are never or infrequently used. I have searched for and programmed into my scanner many of these frequencies in years past. Most of the time I never heard anything.

Dave
 

ecps92

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You do understand that the RRDB is built upon user submissions and not a dump of FCC license data.

Many folks just want and a limited set actually contribute to building the ACCURACY of the Database

Yea, that's what I'm learning. Problem is....

When a noob such as myself forks over $ to help the site and to access the RR database, assuming it's the most recent and current source,... only to discover (usually much later), that it's missing important freqs/agencies... and consequently, not programmed into one's 'programmable' scanner.

I guess my only recourse is to frequently visit the FCC database, and learn how to manually plug-in individual freqs/agencies to assure that what I have is current. In addition to being forced to 'search' for activity. Kinda defeats the whole idea behind a owning a 'programmable' scanner... digitally tied to a database. eh? Oh well, thanks for enlightenment guys.

-mary
 

MaryG

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You do understand that the RRDB is built upon user submissions and not a dump of FCC license data.
Yes... 3 years after becoming a member. Never occurred to me to ask, just assumed the RRDB included most/all currently licensed agencies. To be clear, I blame myself only, for being so naive.

Many folks just want and a limited set actually contribute to building the ACCURACY of the Database
I'd prefer to download and have immediate access to ALL currently licensed callsigns in the region/area chosen, then simply L/O those that don't interest me or appear inactive. Lots easier and far less frustrating for this noob to simply L/O an object (for whatever reason)... than ignorantly doing without... and not realizing it. But I assume, (yet again), that I'm likely in the minority.
 

mikewazowski

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The RR database is based on frequencies actually in use and listenable. The FCC database will have a lot of frequencies not in use (decommissioned, future) and a lot of frequencies you can't listen to (telemetry, control, etc). A lot of people don't want to have to wade through and clean all that up.

You'll also lose the descriptions and tones submitted by RR users. The FCC database doesn't have that sort of information.

What I've done is to download everything from the Industry Canada database (FCC equivalent), match it against the RR database deleting any duplicates and then I'll put the leftovers in a special group in my scanner. As I identify the leftovers, I add them to the RR database and they're available for the next time I update the database on my scanner.

It's the best of both worlds.
 

natedawg1604

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....

I'd prefer to download and have immediate access to ALL currently licensed callsigns in the region/area chosen, then simply L/O those that don't interest me or appear inactive. Lots easier and far less frustrating for this noob to simply L/O an object (for whatever reason)... than ignorantly doing without... and not realizing it. But I assume, (yet again), that I'm likely in the minority.
I'm not sure you fully comprehend what this would entail. At one point I briefly attempted to do what you are describing. However, I quickly realized that if I compiled a (non-duplicate/sorted) list of all scannable frequencies from all active FCC licenses in my area (Denver-Metro area), I would likely have TENS of THOUSANDS of frequencies to scan (if not more).

If you are really interested in identifying all active scannable frequencies in your area (not in RR), your time is better spent running your scanner in "search" mode in a particular range, and then incrementally "locking out" individual frequencies as you identify them. If you do this for any length of time, you will likely find a surprising number of active frequencies that will be difficult or impossible to associate with any specific FCC license in your area. Conversely, you will also find many THOUSANDS of frequencies in ULS which are not in active use in your area. Some of them were NEVER in use, some of them stopped being used years ago, some were moved to a friend's site tower 45 miles away without updating ULS, and some of them will be used many years in the future.

Also, sometimes you will find licensed-related documents in the "Admin" section of a ULS license entry with very, uhm, "creative" explanations of what their system is supposedly being used for (I recall reading a submission which indicated certain frequencies would be used for "public safety" purposes, when in fact it was being used by concrete trucks & construction companies...)
 
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