DHS Releases National Emergency Communications Plan

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iMONITOR

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The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released today the National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) to address gaps and determine solutions so that emergency response personnel at all levels of government and across all disciplines can communicate as needed, on demand, and as authorized. The NECP is the nation's first strategic plan to improve emergency response communications, and complements overarching homeland security and emergency communications legislation, strategies and initiatives.

"This is a comprehensive plan designed to drive measurable and sustainable improvements to operable and interoperable emergency communications nationwide over the next three years. It emphasizes the human element and cross-jurisdictional cooperation, going beyond simply buying new equipment," said Homeland Security Under Secretary Robert Jamison. "We have recently approved Statewide Communication Interoperability Plans for all 56 states and territories. Aligning these plans with the NECP will move emergency communications forward and further promote a coordinated nationwide strategy."


The NECP defines three goals that establish a minimum level of interoperable communications and a deadline for federal, state, local and tribal authorities:
  1. By 2010, 90 percent of all high-risk urban areas designated within the Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) can demonstrate response-level emergency communications within one hour for routine events involving multiple jurisdictions and agencies.
  2. By 2011, 75 percent of non-UASI jurisdictions can demonstrate response-level emergency communications within one hour for routine events involving multiple jurisdictions and agencies.
  3. By 2013, 75 percent of all jurisdictions can demonstrate response-level emergency communications within three hours of a significant event, as outlined in the department's national planning scenarios.
The NECP enhances governance, planning, technology, training and exercises, and disaster communications capabilities with recommendations and milestones for emergency responders and relevant government officials. It is designed to drive measurable and sustainable improvements over the next five years consistent with the: National Response Framework; National Incident Management System; National Preparedness Guidelines; and Target Capabilities List. NECP goals, along with these other department strategies, will improve nationwide response efforts and bolster situational awareness, information sharing and command and control operations.
The department's Office of Emergency Communications developed the NECP in cooperation with more than 150 public and private sector emergency communications officials. The department's new Interoperable Emergency Communications Grant Program will further enable states to align their plans with the NECP.

http://www.dhs.gov/xnews/releases/pr_1217529182375.shtm
 
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comsec1

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56 states?

"We have recently approved Statewide Communication Interoperability Plans for all 56 states and territories. I thought there were 50 states?
 

mm

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Another bunch of politicians who know nothing about radio coming up with a plan only because it's an election year, next year I'm sure this plan will be different.

One hour response for anything dealing with public safety is still very piss poor quality.


They'd be better outfitting the entire population with FRS radios.
 

DickH

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Another bunch of politicians who know nothing about radio coming up with a plan only because it's an election year, next year I'm sure this plan will be different.
They can make all the plans they want, but unless someone teaches people how to use the equipment they already have, and then test it on a DAILY basis, it will never work.
They have these once or twice a year tests and then complain they can't talk to each other.

Look at the Boston area Metrofire system. It's tested twice a day, and used nearly every day for fire incidents in the greater Boston area. Works like clockwork.
http://www.massmetrofire.org/
 

eraweeb

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I hope this isn't too dumb of a question that I may have overlooked here or somewhere else.

Is there a place that we can go right now that would show a list of frequencies "most likely" to be used during a major emergency and broken down by either state or major city?

In other words the most likely that would be used by city, state, federal, etc without having to monitor a large number of frequencies all at once.

It would be nice to have such a list that you could just turn on during an emergency without having to also listen to traffic stops, animal control, etc.
 

blinddog50

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eraweeb,
Don't know what type of scanner you have but just allocate one bank or system with local PD, FIRE, OEM, mutual aid etc.
Don't worry about the Feds showing up until after the event is over.
Then they'll arrive with your travel trailer, a bag of ice and a slice of gov't cheese.
Your local people will do all the grunt and dangerous work.
 

Grog

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Then they'll arrive with your travel trailer, a bag of ice and a slice of gov't cheese

I hope you're happy, I'm at work and in the mood for cheese now.


Mmmmm, I have a few MREs in the back of my truck, bet one of them has a cheese spread packet. Guess I have my own version of "gov't cheese" :lol:
 

Grog

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Is'nt this what Nat Tac is for?

Only if everyone has it programmed.

All the VHF/UHF/800 analog channels would be enough to keep a dedicated scanner running, not counting the digital channels and the 700mhz channels. In an ideal world there would be enough 800mhz analog conventional repeaters setup on the standard 800mhz interop channels, but I hate to say it's far from ideal out there.
 

blinddog50

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Instead of wasting the effort with NECP.
Go ahead and put the money and time toward completion of DOJ IWN before 2021.
Regardless of what system they use, the Feds are not going to lower themselves to deal with locals anyway.
 

click23

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I hope this isn't too dumb of a question that I may have overlooked here or somewhere else.

Is there a place that we can go right now that would show a list of frequencies "most likely" to be used during a major emergency and broken down by either state or major city?

In other words the most likely that would be used by city, state, federal, etc without having to monitor a large number of frequencies all at once.

It would be nice to have such a list that you could just turn on during an emergency without having to also listen to traffic stops, animal control, etc.
Here is Tennessee's interop guide. I doubt every state will put this "Not for Public Distribution – Public Safety Sensitive" up on the internet, but eventually as more info comes out, it will be posted to the database.
 
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