Diamond NR22L Experiences?

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RadioDitch

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I was hoping to get some opinions from owners of the Diamond NR22L. I'm heading up into a extremely remote area of the Laurentian Mountains in Québec above Port-Cartier next month for work. I will be at higher elevations, and I'd love to have the advertised 6dB with my FT-857D. How does it perform in the real world in your opinions?

Thanks gents!
 

W9BU

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Note that Diamond advertises the gain of the NR22L to be 6.5 dBi (referenced to a theoretical isotropic radiator) which would be about 4.4 dBd (referenced to a dipole). You have to read antenna gain claims carefully.

That antenna is 8 feet long. It will require a very sturdy mount. I see you are anti-mag-mount, so that's good.

The NR22L is only available with a UHF mount. The UHF connector really was not intended to be a mobile antenna mounting connection. It is lacking strength compared to other antenna mounts, such as the NMO, and it is lacking in designed-in weather sealing. Yes, there are some band-aid solutions to keeping moisture and corrosion out of a UHF antenna mount, but they are band-aids, in my opinion.

The foldover mount on these antennas will require some attention. Over time, the spring which holds the antenna in the upright position will get weak. The result is antenna that is loose at the base. Also, the foldover mount is a place for corrosion to seep in which could make for a static-y signal.

Yes, the Diamond/Comet antenna designs, and the cheap copies of them, are popular and lots of hams use them. When I was first licensed, I thought they were hot stuff ( I used to have a Diamond SG7900). Nowadays, I use commercial LMR antennas, mostly from Larsen, on the ham bands. They are very reliable. A Larsen NMO150 is a 5/8 wave design with a real-world gain of 3 dBd.
 

RadioDitch

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Note that Diamond advertises the gain of the NR22L to be 6.5 dBi (referenced to a theoretical isotropic radiator) which would be about 4.4 dBd (referenced to a dipole). You have to read antenna gain claims carefully.

That antenna is 8 feet long. It will require a very sturdy mount. I see you are anti-mag-mount, so that's good.

The NR22L is only available with a UHF mount. The UHF connector really was not intended to be a mobile antenna mounting connection. It is lacking strength compared to other antenna mounts, such as the NMO, and it is lacking in designed-in weather sealing. Yes, there are some band-aid solutions to keeping moisture and corrosion out of a UHF antenna mount, but they are band-aids, in my opinion.

The foldover mount on these antennas will require some attention. Over time, the spring which holds the antenna in the upright position will get weak. The result is antenna that is loose at the base. Also, the foldover mount is a place for corrosion to seep in which could make for a static-y signal.

Yes, the Diamond/Comet antenna designs, and the cheap copies of them, are popular and lots of hams use them. When I was first licensed, I thought they were hot stuff ( I used to have a Diamond SG7900). Nowadays, I use commercial LMR antennas, mostly from Larsen, on the ham bands. They are very reliable. A Larsen NMO150 is a 5/8 wave design with a real-world gain of 3 dBd.
I appreciate the reply. Honestly, I'd only have the antenna mounted once up on the roads in the mountains, and if the antenna saw speeds of more than 15mph on the truck, it would probably be because of something involving a cliff and requiring search and rescue. The roads are awful up there. I had also considered buying/tuning a Larson NMO, I have one for the railroad band, and I really love it. Just figured I would get some opinions on the Diamond behemoth first.

Thanks gents.
 

KE5MC

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snip...

The roads are awful up there.
snip...

Thanks gents.
I don't off-road, but friends I know stay with the shorter antennas. Whipping back and forth of the vehicle chassis puts a beating on long antennas at the base connection.

Mike
 
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