Different listings for NXDN, and question about programming .

JGinMD

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Jun 24, 2018
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Montgomery Village, MD
A search on digitalfrequencysearch.com for Montgomery county MD for NXDN frequencies yields listings of several CSX railroad frequencies ( 160.23, 160.32, 160.785, 161.145, 161.235, 161.355 ). In the RRDB, performing a search for Montgomery county MD for NXDN systems shows none of the CSX freqeuncies found in digitalfrequencysearch.com. Any insight into the difference between the sources? Would these likely be single frequency NXDN systems? Is there a reference or post with instructions on how to program NXDN systems on an SDS100? I have purchased, loaded, and validated the key for NXDN on my SDS100.
 
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GTR8000

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The frequency search website you reference is nothing but a cull of the FCC ULS; none of the search results are verified, it's just a data dump of FCC licenses. It's very easy to license multiple emissions, which is why you may find P25, DMR, NXDN, etc. emissions alongside analog FM on many licenses these days. Having those digital emissions licensed does not guarantee that those modulations are actually in use.

The RRDB, on the other hand, is based on user submitted information. In other words, verified information from first hand monitoring.

I would suggest programming those CSX frequencies into your SDS100 as conventional entries, with an audio type of ALL. If they are indeed using NXDN, the scanner should recognize it automatically. If they are analog, you'll be able to figure that out also. Note that it's highly unlikely that CSX is operating on a NXDN trunked system, so don't worry about getting into the trunked system programming aspect of it just yet.
 

oneadam12-va

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Oct 14, 2006
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Danville, VA
CSX is using analog for about 90% of it's system...there are a few places where they use NXDN for yard work...but as of now the mainline is in the clear...this goes for most of the class 1 railroads in the US..,
 

RRR

They are just 3 R's. Don't look too much into it
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Not all Class 1 mainlines are analog, all the time. Things are starting to change.
 
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