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Digital Baby Monitors

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RayAir

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Just out of curiosity does anyone know what type of digital scheme is used for baby monitors. I have a pair of Graco digital monitors. I scanned them through a sweeper and they use FH, but the voice is digitally coded. What standard are they using?
 

RayAir

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Were you expecting more?
I would appreciate the courtesy that if what you have to say is nowhere close to having any value, then please say nothing at all.
 
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N_Jay

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I would appreciate the courtesy that if what you have to say is nowhere close to having any value, then please say nothing at all.
I asked a simple question.

Sorry if my questions 'have nowhere close to any value' in your opinion.

Hmmm, wonder if you hold your own posts to the same standard? (but we are off topic now, so don't bother answering).

In general the FCC filings would not have the data you were looking for, unless I have missed something, and thought maybe if you were expecting more your answer would have been informative and educating. (Sorry, my mistake)
 

kb1ipd

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It is possible that they use DECT (the standard used by some cordless telephones). Some digital baby monitors do use DECT.

If it is not DECT then in all likelihood it is a completely proprietary system that does not conform to any given standard.
 

talkpair

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If it is not DECT then in all likelihood it is a completely proprietary system that does not conform to any given standard.
OpenCrib............encryption optional.........(as if baby jabber isn't already cryptic enough) :)

I've often thought about using a baby monitor to extend my home scanner's audio to my outdoor activities........lawn mowing in particular.
I realize that just using a portable would be an easier solution, but I'd rather have the performance of a base station.

Anyone have rough range estimates for these things?................I recall having a 49 MHz cordless phone with intercom years ago...... and was alarmed one quiet evening when I heard someone's baby crying in the other room where the base was located.
I have no idea where the signal was coming from, since none of the neighbors had a baby.

There seems to be a good supply of baby monitors on auction sites.
 

WA6IJD

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You might look for used wireless mic transmitters. I've found a few. They work out great. One's I've found use 900 Mhz WFM.
 

kb1ipd

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Anyone have rough range estimates for these things?................I recall having a 49 MHz cordless phone with intercom years ago...... and was alarmed one quiet evening when I heard someone's baby crying in the other room where the base was located.
I have no idea where the signal was coming from, since none of the neighbors had a baby.
The very old cordless phones on the 49mhz band were not very good at all at keeping signals apart. Not much bandwidth in that area and they don't seem to have had a very good system for choosing an open frequency.

I would not even bother with those kind of things - go for something at a much higher frequency, like 900 mhz at least or 2.4 ghz or something. Much better quality, less static less potential for crosstalk. Analog might even be okay, if you don't care about the privacy of the transmission.

Distance has more to do with clear line of sight than anything else. If you put it on the second or third floor of a house and it's not made of brick or has aluminum siding you should be able to get it for a very considerable distance. Of course, higher RF output power will help in this area as well.
 

OCO

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If you don't care about it being analog, consider using something that broadcasts (part 15 legal) in the 88-108 Mhz FM band to extend your listening area. The obvious benefit is the receiver can be anything from an earmuff/fm radio to a portable boombox and you can even feed separate mono feeds in the L/R stereo inputs, although separation is not all that great..(somewhere around 35 db. IIRC). I've used a Ramsey FM100 for years, but there are a lot of kits on the market that would work (although I would use one with digital syntheses for tuning - the older non synthesized ones tend to drift).

Just realized how old the thread was... Oh well:roll: :roll:
 
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stlouisx50

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I realize this is an old thread, but wanted to give a heads up to anyone searching and reading the topic.

I had got a pair of wireless headphones for Christmas and they are supposed to operate on 49.870, however I get major out of frequency slippage going all the way up to 49.895. The good thing is, the headphones seem to have a auto tune feature, which solves that problem. You may have to so call push the scan button to get it back on frequency , but they worked to a range of .27 miles
 
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