"Dignitaries" get enhanced 911 response in wake of new Denver rules

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natedawg1604

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"Denver Mayor Michael Hancock's office in October complained about having to wait for more than 35 minutes for a dispatcher to send a patrol unit to respond to a burglary report from the office.

That incident culminated in the firing of the dispatcher, who contends the mayor's office should have had to wait like everyone else for police resources to become available. Rowena Alegria, Hancock's director of communications, said the mayor's office did not seek the firing. The mayor also did not request the new policy, she said."
I would think the Mayor should be treated just like everyone else...


"Dignitaries" get enhanced 911 response in wake of new Denver rules - The Denver Post
 

KK6DEL

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dw2872

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It sounds like the dispatchers are being stepped on by the dispatch supervisors and director. If they don't train the dispatchers to do that then they should not expect them to do it. The buck should stop with the supervisor and director anyway. Why are they not taking the heat for all these recent incidents?
 

mmckenna

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Dispatchers are usually union employees, so it's unlikely this is anything other than what it says in the article.
Dispatch centers have very detailed protocols for a very good reason, not following those is going to get a dispatcher in trouble. Dispatching isn't a free for all sport where individual dispatchers get to change the rules. When someones life is on the line, things have to be done by the book. This didn't sound like a life or death situation, but it would have been fairly high priority.

On the surface, this does sound like elitism, but in reality a break in at a city office can be a security risk. Sounds like the dispatcher didn't follow the protocols, which would explain the termination.

As for the dignitaries getting preferred treatment, well, that's life. I work very closely with our dispatchers and I know for sure there are times when I've received preferential treatment that someone else might not get. Not my choice, but just the way it is.
 

Kevin_N

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Doesn't sound like a big deal. They just notify supervisors. They don't necessarily get a better response.

The media trying to stir things up yet again.
 

dw2872

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The Denver Police union was the first to chime in on the Kristine Kirk shooting delayed response and blamed staffing changes and a re-organization effort spearheaded by Denver Police Chief Robert White. The Denver police union speaks up for each and every incident where a police officer that is a dues paying member has a problem.

Chief White then defended his re-organization efforts and blamed the dispatcher.

There is a deafening quietness where nobody is defending dispatchers for ANY incident that has come up in the last few years. Is Denver 911 part of any union such as CWA or are they even allowed to be? CWA defends their members in cases like these but has not been involved at all in Denver. If they are under a union then the union does not seem to be worth it.

I listened to the DPD dispatch audio for district-3 for the Kirk incident (not just the RadioReference archive that only includes about half of the pertinent D3 radio transmissions due to scanning of all 6 district channels). I found that DPD officers were distracting the dispatcher with several things that should have been taken to the Clearance channel. They were asking her to call other non-Denver agencies to pass information for them and also asked her to look up and then give them directions over the radio to an Aurora address where the officers were going to drive. Also, after initially dispatching to the Kirk DV call, one officer that was dispatched to a fireworks complaint call about 3 minutes away (0.7 miles away) called over the radio that he was coming on scene at the fireworks call and after he was finished dealing with that then he would cover the other officer on Kirk call, saying to cancel the second officer (which the dispatcher did). Other times, officers would have said "divert me" and went to a DV call first. All of this would have been out there if Denver 911 had an effective union to defend them like the PD has.




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dw2872

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Interesting... so something that could wait 3 hours before reporting all of a sudden required immediate Police attention?

I am pretty sure the mayor's office did not want any of this to come out for their "burglary" incident. Any good investigative reporter can see that the burglary story (even without the dispatch part) will lead to some uncovering of some shady operations with the mayor's staff. Why did they wait a few hours to call?

More will definitely come out on that incident. Otherwise this is just lazy journalism.
 

dw2872

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VERY strange that the mayor's office director called towards the end of the day. It apparently took them all day to call. The officer was dispatched to the city/county building at 5:18 pm (yes PM) on a POSSIBLE trespass/burglary call.

A couple minutes later, the District-6 commander asked if the call had been dispatched.

I can't wait to see the report on this one.
 
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dw2872

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I wonder if this has anything with Denver's bid to host the RNC?
Great insight Steve! I am sure they need to make an effort to look like they are cleaning house after some of the recent Denver-911 news stories.

And if you were around to see the DNC come to Denver in 2008, the Denver Public Safety EDACS went to ESK system-wide, causing the older scanners to go silent (or at least not track) on the morning of August 22, 2008, just a few days before the DNC kicked off (after testing ESK on and off since June 2008).

It would be naive to think they wouldn't make some changes to the system before August 2016 for the RNC, if they win the bid. In fact, that may be a deal breaker (ESK probably was for the DNC bid).
 

dw2872

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Luckily going P25 will just be catching up with the rest of Colorado and won't hurt listeners. It is the other P25 features that are a little worrisome.

P25 for Denver City Services, then Public Safety, then DIA obviously. As usual, Aurora will probably wait and see what went wrong with Denver's implementation and then do exactly that.
 

Mick

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Denver rescinds 911 dispatch protocol for "dignitaries"

Denver officials have rescinded a policy that required 911 dispatchers to alert police patrol supervisors when elected officials or their staff sought out police response in Denver.

Daelene Mix, communications director for the city's safety department, said the policy had caused confusion and was never intended to supersede other policies governing prioritizing of police resources.

Denver rescinds 911 dispatch protocol for "dignitaries" - The Denver Post
 

dw2872

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The policy made them look bad, and it also made it appear the dispatchers needed updated guidance that was not in place when the dispatcher was fired (which would give credence to what she said when she was following policy but still got fired).

They were pretty much forced to rescind it but obviously they will still have an unwritten rule now, unless someone else wants fired.
 
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