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DOS and the USB

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skierp20

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Hello again, everyone.

I have a question about programming using DOS based Motorola Software. The problem is, thw adapter for the 9-Pin port which connects to the Rib less programming cable runs through one of the USB Ports (designated COM 9) on the computer..

When the DOS based programming software is used, it is unable to read/write to the Radio because the program does not recognize COM 9.

I am currently shopping around for the proper adapters to put a rig together that fits to my 15 Pin VGA port, but I was wondering in the meantime if anyone had any tips, tricks, or tools that would allow DOS and the Software to recognize my USB COM Port.

A DOS Emulator doesnt seem to work, I've checked the WIKIs here on the website and come up empty so far, and I'm currently googling and searching whatever I can.

If anyone has any info etc. it would be GREATLY appreciated!

Scott
 
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scanfan03

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Boot to Dos 6.22 USB. I had to do this to make it recognize my hard drive. Also it should be COM 1 once it boots into DOS. But I bet right now DOS isn't recognizing anything USB on your computer because it doesn't have the drivers installed.
 

gmclam

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If the software you are using requires DOS, and it uses a standard COM port, and your computer only has USB ports, my solution is to get yourself a COM card. Set the COM card up so that the port(s) are the lowest COM port you can use between COM1 & COM4.

There are quite a few issues here. I wonder what you have your BIOS set to regarding the USB ports. There is one setting to enable them and others depending on the specific BIOS. Next the "operating system" must take over to get things going. Typically Windows will assign hardware resources and device "handles" to provide a connection between the software and the USB port handler.

If you consider what Windows has to do to get a USB device working, DOS will have to do all those same things PLUS there needs to be something to recognize the USB ports in the first place. In other words, even once DOS recognizes that there are USB ports (and can talk to them) next the drivers for the device (in this case a serial cable) must be loaded that conforms to the O/s. This driver must plug itself in so that any call the software makes to COM ports it can translate into whatever is needed to do that to the USB.

Some software is written with I/O addresses and some go through the BIOS or DOS. Those that go through the BIOS or DOS are typically trapped and made to work. Those that talk to hardware directly (I/O addresses) dont work because there is no physical COM9 hardware on your machine - COM9 is being simulated by the USB driver.
 
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