DPS 10-38 Frank "Sound alike"

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cellphone

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I frequently hear this communication on DPS channels:

Dispatcher: [Alert tone] "10-38 Frank, MDC" [Location]
Officer: "Code 4. Sound alike. Not my subject."

I get that 10-38 Frank is a Felony warrant. I assume the "MDC" portion of the transmission means the dispatcher is sending the info to the officer's MDC. Please explain if this is not correct.

What I don't understand is the officer responding stating it is a "Sound alike". I'm imagining software that is listening to the Officer's Body/Car camera mic and generating an alert to the dispatcher when hears a name that sounds like a name with a Felony warrant.

Can anyone explain what is occurring that the officer determines that it is a "Sound alike"?
 

byndhlptom

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Soud-a-like

If my memory serves....

NCIS has a "sound-a-like" function. When you enter a name into the system, the computer will also display names that may be pronounced/spelled similarly. The officer may not always have correct spelling. Also, criminals have been known to change a letter or two in their name to avoid matches/hits

$.02
 

hiegtx

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I frequently hear this communication on DPS channels:

Dispatcher: [Alert tone] "10-38 Frank, MDC" [Location]
Officer: "Code 4. Sound alike. Not my subject."

I get that 10-38 Frank is a Felony warrant. I assume the "MDC" portion of the transmission means the dispatcher is sending the info to the officer's MDC. Please explain if this is not correct.

What I don't understand is the officer responding stating it is a "Sound alike". I'm imagining software that is listening to the Officer's Body/Car camera mic and generating an alert to the dispatcher when hears a name that sounds like a name with a Felony warrant.

Can anyone explain what is occurring that the officer determines that it is a "Sound alike"?
I've heard similar conversations in my area. The "hit" (warrant) is for someone with the same or similar name &/or DOB, or or a known alias of a person with the same details as the subject being checked. The 'not my subject' reply indicates that the officer has determined that the person he checked differs from the one described in the warrant. Such as different height/weight, basic description, and perhaps race. In other words, only the 'name' matches.

Basically, the same situation as byndhlptom noted.
 

cmaness2001

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Heh, I got rear-ended on the US60 a few months ago. A DPS motor officer took the report. He ran the other guy first, he had a suspended license and no insurance but there was not a peep from the radio. Then he scanned my license and about 15 seconds later the warble tone went off.
"10-38 Frank MDT, US60 North of Dobson"

He gave the code4-sound alike and mentioned to me that it was probably something like a same middle name or DOB.

It would be interesting to see the exact algorithm that is used...
 

KB7MIB

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The MDC portion is because the trooper (not officer anymore :) ) originally ran the info on his or her MDC, and the dispatchers can see this and respond to wants and warrants by contacting the trooper via voice radio in case the trooper has stepped out of their vehicle, and doesn't see the info on their screen.

John
Peoria
 

N9JIG

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Some states call that a "Soundex" hit. Soundex is an algorithm that classifies names into numbers and is used to generate driver's license numbers in some states as well as compare names for possible hits in the various warrants systems.

An inquiry on a name like Jones would also hit on a name Janes.
 

n0doz

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You guys pretty much nailed it. When I was in LE, we frequently cleared people with common names as well as names that are pronounced the same but spelled differently. The dispatchers learn to weed out most similar-but-wrong-guys, but if it's really close, they'll give it to the officer to decide based on what he sees. Even so, there are rare occasions when the person gets taken in but get released when the prints don't match. Has to be really, really close, such as exact name/DOB, for that to happen. Also happens when someone uses another person's name when getting a ticket and then doesn't take care of it. If it's an offense that can turn into a warrant, the real guy can get stopped and arrested.
 
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