emergency alert sirens

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godskidz

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Hi to ya'll
Does anyone know where to find the frequencies for the weather alert sirens that are located throughout
the county & towns on poles
I live in Callaway county Missouri.
The town is Holts Summit.
It seems that they are located through out Missouri.
Thanks
GOD BLESS
 
K

kb0nly

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The sirens are generally turned on an off with a tone out from the dispatch on the same paging frequency they use for other emergency services, such as ambulance and fire.

Where i live they have one county wide paging frequency thats used for all fire, ems, ambulance, and sirens. All have a different tone of course.
 

byndhlptom

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JoCo, KS (SoDak native)
Alert sirens.

In larger counties, they are often controlled by the county emergency management department. If your county has one, they probably use that freq for siren activation. There may be more than one tone if they have subdivided the county into different alert zones

tom
 

Alliance01TX

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Howdy

The prior post are correct and in some areas we have dedicated frequencies for the City-Wide Sirens to be Openned /Closed for Public Safety. In north Texas we have multiple cities using VHF, UHF along with embedded tones (as noted in prior post) so all seem you work well.

You might try a 'County Search' on the FCC Search Database at:

URL: License Search

Let us know what you find....

Thx

Bill
 

gewecke

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Our county uses 5 tone sequential encoding on 800 mhz. with each site sending a diagnostic signal every 8 seconds back to the main station with a CWID sent every 15 minutes.
n9zas
 

wb0wao

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Cape Girardeau County activates the county sirens with a 4 digit DTMF signal transmitted on the County 911 system used to page out the county FD's/First Responders. Cape Girardeau City uses a seperate channel (listed as "Fleet Maintenance") and uses a short data burst to activate the city sirens. I think that this channel is also used for EMA activity - but the only traffic I have monitored on it is the data bursts.

Dennis
 

talkpair

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Clinton County, MO
I have stumbled across several over the years, just by listening during severe weather, or during the monthly siren activation tests.

The agencies I monitor usually use either a single tone, or 2-tone sequential.

They usually give a voice message to "stand by" for siren activation, before sending.

In addition to siren activation,...Clay, Ray counties do a daily "severe storm warning receiver" test on Sheriff's net (155.73)......11am and 10 am respectively.,,,,,I also hear Carroll and Livingston counties doing the same thing on the same frequency at various times.

The Severe storm warning receiver's aren't the same as the siren activation, but sound somewhat identical.

It would be interesting to know exactly WHO has these receivers.

Several years ago, I retrofitted a single channel Regency monitor to decode and unsquelch, using a Midian Electronics 2-tone sequential decoder.

The daily weather test got to be a pain to reset every day, so i only turn it on during severe weather.

It works great, because I'm in an area where there are no sirens.

I put this radio together before the weather service began using the Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME)
 

wb0wao

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Cape Girardeau, MO
In addition to siren activation,...Clay, Ray counties do a daily "severe storm warning receiver" test on Sheriff's net (155.73)......11am and 10 am respectively.,,,,,I also hear Carroll and Livingston counties doing the same thing on the same frequency at various times.

The Severe storm warning receiver's aren't the same as the siren activation, but sound somewhat identical.

It would be interesting to know exactly WHO has these receivers.
When I used to work for Miami Co. KS Sheriff's Office back in the late 70's, all of the schools, nursing homes and the hospital had Plectron receivers that were activated by the same system as the sirens but with different coding. When a T-Storm or Tornado watch was issued, we "hit the button" and transmitted the watch information. I do not recall if it was on the SO's dispatch frequency or was on 39.58 which was - at that time - a common frequency for what would now be considered mutual aid.

Dennis
 

talkpair

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I do not recall if it was on the SO's dispatch frequency or was on 39.58 which was - at that time - a common frequency for what would now be considered mutual aid
Many smaller cities and counties in northwest Missouri operated on 155.73 before moving to their own frequencies. Since the sirens were installed before the move, they probably chose to just leave them as-is.

Perhaps some of the logic behind this was so that another law enforcement agency nearby could also activate those sirens in the event of a radio or equipment failure, with the right encoder, of course.

Does anyone know if there is a turn-off code for sirens, or do they normally just run for a predetermined number of minutes ?

Sort of an off topic question, but still siren related........."noon whistle"..........how many places still have them ?.......I'm guessing these are activated by timer...... I know Cameron does, and Braymer and Hamilton used to.
 

wb0wao

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Just for my own personal recollection, I got ahold of a buddy I had when I was a deputy back then who also worked at the SO then as well. Our system was on the main SO frequency of 39.64 which was the one thing that I did not remember. I remember the control console which had several rows of buttons on it. There was one for the Plectrons in which we pressed and then transmitted the information about the hazard. The sirens had three modes - warning, attack and all clear (this was also supposed to be used for nuclear attack as well). IIRC they were on for about 5 minutes and then shut down automatically. Our protocol was to set them off when the WX bureau issued a tornado warning _or_ a trained spotter or LE officer spotted a tornado on the ground or a funnel cloud. We had a LOT of protocols dealing with severe weather and many of them were contingent on trained volunteer spotters. This was in the day before Doppler and NexRad radar and most of the time all the warning you got was someone trained spotting one on the ground. During that time, I can only recall one or two instances that NOAA issued a tornado warning before we actually spotted one - and I think that was due to them being spotted in another county to the west or southwest of us and heading into our county.

As far as the noon sirens go, I remember a couple of small towns doing that with the siren they used to summon the VFD - kind of like the daily comm checks you hear on FD systems now.


Dennis
 
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