Emergency frequencies for HT

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rc1990

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Good day all.

I purchase 2 Baofeng UV-82 radios to be used primarly as walkie-takies on FRS and GMRS freqs for camping and outdoor sports. I was wondering if there's any frequencies (that are constantly monitored - VHF/UHF) I can program into the radios in case of an emergency?

I did a wiki search and found in a few thread that ppl recommended buying a device that sends out a beaon for emergency services to find you. That's not exactly what I'm looking for. I would like possible radio freqs.

Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
 
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125

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There are no emergency freqs for pubic use. Ham and commecial frequencies you need a license to operate on those (I.C. approved radio's for commecail use) GMRS/FRS ch 1 is most popular channel in use. the baofeng and the other chinese import radios are actually ment for Ham use and legally can't be used for anything else (TX wise that is). Your only real option for emergency help out in the bush is a satellite phone.
 

rc1990

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There are no emergency freqs for pubic use. Ham and commecial frequencies you need a license to operate on those (I.C. approved radio's for commecail use) GMRS/FRS ch 1 is most popular channel in use. the baofeng and the other chinese import radios are actually ment for Ham use and legally can't be used for anything else (TX wise that is). Your only real option for emergency help out in the bush is a satellite phone.
Thanks for the info!

I never actualy though of a sat phone.

Cheers.
 
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tilt404

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I would suggest you do more research on the legal side of transmitting since you can't just pick any emergency frequency to transmit on or even transmit on FRS/GMRS with that radio legally. You can only talk on the 2m/70cm amateur radio bands but even then you need to take the exam and be certified and use your call sign when transmitting. Both people using each radio need to be certified for the amateur bands. You could end up causing interference on a proper emergency frequency which is very serious. These aren't walkie-talkies and you really should learn more about the laws of use.
 

Forts

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There was actually a case a few years back in California I believe... Hiker was out and broke his leg I believe. All he had with him was an HT and he couldn't hail anyone so he punched in the local sheriff's department frequency to call for help. He was able to raise them, was rescued, then charged for using their frequency. Seemed a little heavy handed for someone who was in a legitimate emergency but I guess it was zero tolerance time.

Sent from my SGH-I747M using Tapatalk
 

tilt404

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Not something I think I would do or could do here, but I guess that's what cell phones are for and 911. I also have a baofeng and like the HT but since it can transmit out of band, using the HT takes a lot of responsibility and care. I stick to the 2m/70cm bands where I can talk but unlike typical HT's where I never worried much about talking out of band, on this one I really have to be careful.
 

Elginmonitor89

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Emergency frequencies

FCC rule 97.405 allows a station in distress and requesting emergency help, to use any means of radio communications at their disposal to attract attention and request help. Any frequency on which you think you will be heard, any mode, any power level necessary, even outside of your normal privileges may be used as long as the emergency exists. In addition FCC Rule 97.403 states that no provision of these rules prevents the use by an amateur station of any means of radiocommunication at its disposal to provide essential communications needs in connection with the immediate safety of human life and immediate protection of property when normal communication systems are not available.These rules seem to apply to licensed amateur radio operators only and I don't know if there are similar rules for other types of radiocommunication stations.
 

tilt404

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The FCC is for the US though, so I'm not sure of the laws here. Most emergency frequencies in my area of Canada though are DMR/TRBO/P25 so not likely a consumer radio could transmit on them anyway. When I wrote my amateur radio exam I don't remember anything saying I could talk on other frequencies in emergency so maybe the laws are different here or my memory isn't that good.
 

Elginmonitor89

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Sorry, I didn't note the Canada address,but I would bet Canada has similar rules for emergency situations. Good luck.
 

rc1990

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Thanks everyone. I'm happy I didn't use them right away when I got them.

You all posted very good and important points. I guess I'll be doing some research and might be putting them on sale or get into the HAM radio hobby!

Thanks again!.
 

WB4CS

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FCC rule 97.405 allows a station in distress and requesting emergency help, to use any means of radio communications at their disposal to attract attention and request help. Any frequency on which you think you will be heard, any mode, any power level necessary, even outside of your normal privileges may be used as long as the emergency exists. In addition FCC Rule 97.403 states that no provision of these rules prevents the use by an amateur station of any means of radiocommunication at its disposal to provide essential communications needs in connection with the immediate safety of human life and immediate protection of property when normal communication systems are not available.These rules seem to apply to licensed amateur radio operators only and I don't know if there are similar rules for other types of radiocommunication stations.
Just to clarify, even though the OP is in Canada, Elginmonitor89 you are misunderstanding what FCC rule 97.405 means. Part 97 rules apply to ONLY Part 97 spectrum. This rule means that a Technician Class ham can use General or Extra Class *AMATEUR* frequencies in a life-or-death emergency. It is not a "free pass" to use any frequencies outside of the Amateur Radio bands. Police and other public service frequencies are governed by Part 90 rules, Part 97 Amateur Service rules do not apply.

I have confirmed this with the FCC and have documented proof of this from an FCC Enforcement Officer. His email reply can be found on post #38 of this forum post.
 

kd7mxi

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1st rule .,,,, dont listen to the preppers ,,, they may think they or in there words the public owns all frequencies etc , but there wrong
 

VA3NEK

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There was actually a case a few years back in California I believe... Hiker was out and broke his leg I believe. All he had with him was an HT and he couldn't hail anyone so he punched in the local sheriff's department frequency to call for help. He was able to raise them, was rescued, then charged for using their frequency. Seemed a little heavy handed for someone who was in a legitimate emergency but I guess it was zero tolerance time.
If I remember the story correctly part of the issue was the modification of the radio to cover the law enforcement frequencies.
All law enforcement on both sides of the border are very touchy about this sort of thing.
 
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