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FCC Licensing: Adding a repeater pair to an existing License.

K5DVT

Member
Feed Provider
Joined
Jun 1, 2014
Messages
19
Location
Huntsville
Hello all. This is a bit of a weird question, and if it's the wrong forum, I'm sorry.

I'm the local "radio guy". I have experience in UHF/VHF amateur and commerical repeaters alike, so the repeater scene isn't new. What is is the licensing part.

I've been approached by a place that has 4 UHF repeater pairs for HTs limited at 6 watts. What's odd is the license was made to have the HTs transmit on both the normal high input AND the low output (like talk around) but they don't have license for a repeater class station (FB2).

Well they are discovering they need a repeater, and asked me to look into building one.

Obviously they've been coordinated to get those pairs. Would I need to go through a coordinator just to be able to added a FB2 to that license? Not looking to added additional frequencies, just that extra class on one of the UHF channels. I've found a coordinator that could do that, but I'd like to do it myself and add the class if I could. That would save some money not having to deal with the coordinator.

Thanks all
 

alcahuete

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Jul 24, 2015
Messages
1,480
Location
Antelope Acres, California
Went through this myself not terribly long ago. The answer I got (from the FCC and my coordinator, for what it's worth) was yes, it has to go through a coordinator. It's not just a matter of adding the FB2 to the license, you have to calculate the HAAT, take into consideration other entities on those pairs, etc. Presumably the repeater is going to be using more than the 6 watts, and will have a fixed antenna, etc. There are a number of things the FCC takes into consideration when it comes to licensing repeaters.

The second thing, since you said you found a coordinator, if it's not the same coordinator that took care of the frequencies initially, you might have issues. I had the exact same issue. This new coordinator very likely doesn't "own" those frequency pairs, and they will have to go through the other coordinator, who may or may not approve the request. In my case, the original coordinator gave approval to the new coordinator for use of those frequencies, however, there was a small fee attached.
 

ecps92

Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2002
Messages
11,928
Location
Taxachusetts
First, are the 2 Pairs 5 Mhz apart [or 3 Mhz for T-Band], if not then you need a new pair.

As to by-passing a Coordinator, both Business and Public Safety would need to go thru Coordination since you are
now going from "MO" aka Portable/Mobile to "FB2" being a Repeater and coordination to prevent interference is 100% needed.
Hello all. This is a bit of a weird question, and if it's the wrong forum, I'm sorry.

I'm the local "radio guy". I have experience in UHF/VHF amateur and commerical repeaters alike, so the repeater scene isn't new. What is is the licensing part.

I've been approached by a place that has 4 UHF repeater pairs for HTs limited at 6 watts. What's odd is the license was made to have the HTs transmit on both the normal high input AND the low output (like talk around) but they don't have license for a repeater class station (FB2).

Well they are discovering they need a repeater, and asked me to look into building one.

Obviously they've been coordinated to get those pairs. Would I need to go through a coordinator just to be able to added a FB2 to that license? Not looking to added additional frequencies, just that extra class on one of the UHF channels. I've found a coordinator that could do that, but I'd like to do it myself and add the class if I could. That would save some money not having to deal with the coordinator.

Thanks all
 

fwradio

Texas DB Admin
Database Admin
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
343
Location
Fort Worth, Texas
A coordinator is required. At one time (and maybe still) there was a way to log into the FCC as the licensee and submit an application with those changes. But the FCC system will return the application requesting certification from a frequency coordinator. They will not approve the application without it.
 
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